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  • The Auditing Section
    Exploring Trust and the Auditor-Client Relationship: Factors...
    research summary posted May 3, 2012 by The Auditing Section, tagged 08.0 Auditing Procedures – Nature, Timing and Extent, 08.04 Auditors’ Professional Skepticism, 09.0 Auditor Judgment, 09.10 Prior Dispositions/Biases/Auditor state of mind, 10.0 Engagement Management, 10.04 Interactions with Client Management in Auditing Section Research Summary Database > Auditing Section Research Summaries Space public
    Title:
    Exploring Trust and the Auditor-Client Relationship: Factors Influencing the Auditor’s Trust of a Client Representative
    Practical Implications:

    The findings provide evidence that auditors do hold a level of trust in client representatives and that the level of trust is associated with commonplace behaviors of client representative that attract trust.  The results of this study are important to make auditors and auditing standards setters aware of factors that may lead to greater auditor trust of client management and perhaps consider whether there may be a potential for excessive trust to overwhelm the auditor’s professional skepticism. Note that the study was unable to determine whether the levels of trust that the auditors had for the client were such that auditor judgment would be compromised.

    Citation:

    Rennie, M. D., L. S. Kopp, and W. M. Lemon. 2010. Exploring Trust and the Auditor-Client Relationship: Factors Influencing the Auditor’s Trust of a Client Representative. Auditing: A Journal of Practice and Theory 29 (1): 279-293

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  • The Auditing Section
    Development of a Scale to Measure Professional Skepticism
    research summary posted May 2, 2012 by The Auditing Section, tagged 08.0 Auditing Procedures – Nature, Timing and Extent, 08.04 Auditors’ Professional Skepticism, 09.0 Auditor Judgment, 09.10 Prior Dispositions/Biases/Auditor state of mind in Auditing Section Research Summary Database > Auditing Section Research Summaries Space public
    Title:
    Development of a Scale to Measure Professional Skepticism
    Practical Implications:

    This study provides accounting firms with the first instrument theoretically designed to measure professional skepticism in auditors.  Objective measures of professional skepticism may be helpful to firms looking to increase audit efficiency or effectiveness, specifically in critical areas such as hypothesis generation, risk identification and fraud detection.

    Citation:

    Hurtt, R. K. (2010). Development of a Scale to Measure Professional Skepticism. Auditing: A Journal of Practice & Theory 29(1): 149-171.

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  • The Auditing Section
    Auditors’ Assessment and Incorporation of Expectation P...
    research summary posted April 16, 2012 by The Auditing Section, tagged 08.0 Auditing Procedures – Nature, Timing and Extent, 09.0 Auditor Judgment, 09.03 Adequacy of Evidence in Auditing Section Research Summary Database > Auditing Section Research Summaries Space public
    Title:
    Auditors’ Assessment and Incorporation of Expectation Precision in Evidential Analytical Procedures
    Practical Implications:

    The results of this study suggest that auditors’ precision assessments may not be well calibrated for relevant precision factors. Thus, auditors may benefit from additional guidance indicating the factors that should be considered for assessing the precision of analytical
    procedures.  Furthermore, audit firms might want to consider integrating some of the findings of this study into future training sessions and/or decision aids that would assist auditors in improving their precision calibration. An insensitivity to important precision factors may lead to over-reliance on analytical procedures, negatively affecting audit effectiveness. Because the allowance for loan losses is an estimate, the results of this study provide insight into factors that could influence the potential effectiveness of audits of estimates. Understanding how auditors evaluate analytical procedure precision for estimates is particularly critical in that analytical procedures may be the only source of assurance for testing these accounts.

    Citation:

    McDaniel, L.S. and L.E. Simmons. 2007. Auditors’ assessment and incorporation of expectation precision in evidential analytical
    procedures. Auditing: A Journal of Practice & Theory 26(1): 1-18.

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  • The Auditing Section
    Auditors’ Assessment and Incorporation of Expectation P...
    research summary posted April 13, 2012 by The Auditing Section, tagged 08.0 Auditing Procedures – Nature, Timing and Extent, 09.0 Auditor Judgment, 09.03 Adequacy of Evidence in Auditing Section Research Summary Database > Auditing Section Research Summaries Space public
    Title:
    Auditors’ Assessment and Incorporation of Expectation Precision in Evidential Analytical Procedures
    Practical Implications:

    The results of this study suggest that auditors’ precision assessments may not be well calibrated for relevant precision factors. Thus, auditors may benefit from additional guidance indicating the factors that should be considered for assessing the precision of analytical
    procedures.  Furthermore, audit firms might want to consider integrating some of the findings of this study into future training sessions and/or decision aids that would assist auditors in improving their precision calibration. An insensitivity to important precision factors may lead to over-reliance on analytical procedures, negatively affecting audit effectiveness. Because the allowance for loan losses is an estimate, the results of this study provide insight into factors that could influence the potential effectiveness of audits of estimates. Understanding how auditors evaluate analytical procedure precision for estimates is particularly critical in that analytical procedures may be the only source of assurance for testing these accounts.

    Citation:

    McDaniel, L.S. and L.E. Simmons. 2007. Auditors’ assessment and incorporation of expectation precision in evidential analytical procedures. Auditing: A Journal of Practice & Theory 26(1): 1-18.

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  • The Auditing Section
    Why Do Auditor’s Over-Rely on Weak Analytical Procedures? T...
    research summary posted April 13, 2012 by The Auditing Section, tagged 08.0 Auditing Procedures – Nature, Timing and Extent, 08.01 Substantive Analytical Review – Effectiveness, 09.0 Auditor Judgment, 09.03 Adequacy of Evidence in Auditing Section Research Summary Database > Auditing Section Research Summaries Space public
    Title:
    Why Do Auditor’s Over-Rely on Weak Analytical Procedures? The Role of Outcome and Precision
    Practical Implications:

    Analytical procedures are used frequently and increasingly are relied upon as substantive evidence. Based on this study, auditors are insensitive to the impreciseness of the analytical procedure when the results are favorable and may be a cause for over-reliance on weak evidence.  Performing a stronger, more precise analytical procedure caused participants in the favorable outcome situation to become more aware of the weakness of the initial procedure and re-evaluate their evidence strength rating. Further, evidence suggests that having auditors consider the possible weaknesses of an analytical procedure prior to performing the procedure will cause them to rate the strength of the evidence from a weak analytical procedure lower. Overall, this suggests a need to better train auditors in performing and interpreting analytical procedures.

    In a discussion of Glover et al.’s paper, McDaniel asks whether the findings may indicate that auditors in the unfavorable outcome (i.e. there is a material difference) are under-relying on the evidence rather than that auditors in the favorable outcome (no material difference) are over-relying on the evidence. Glover et al. respond that the over-relying of the evidence is of concern to regulators and the alternative does not explain all of the results.  McDaniel also notes that the case study was of a company in the financial industry but that the participants were not required to have any financial industry experience. Glover et al. note that the interest income item is the issue which is not specific to the industry or complicated.  McDaniel also notes concerns about a potential “anchoring” effect as the participants performed their analytical procedures based on prior year working paper results.  In response, Glover et al. discuss this feature of an audit. 

    Citation:

    Glover, S. M., D. F. Prawitt, and T. J. Wilks. 2005.  Why Do Auditor’s Over-Rely on Weak Analytical Procedures?  The Role of Outcome and Precision.  Auditing: A Journal of Practice & Theory 24 (Supplement):  197-220.  

    McDaniel, L. 2005.  DISCUSSION OF Why Do Auditor’s Over-Rely on Weak Analytical Procedures?  The Role of Outcome and Precision.  Auditing: A Journal of Practice & Theory 24 (Supplement):  221-228. 

    Glover, S. M., D. F. Prawlitt, and T. J. Wilks. 2005. REPLY TO DISCUSSION OF Why Do Auditor’s Over-Rely on Weak Analytical Procedures?  The Role of Outcome and Precision.  Auditing: A Journal of Practice & Theory 24 (Supplement):  229-232.

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