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    Susan Haka
    IX. Nomination and Elections Procedures.
    section posted July 2, 2010 by Susan Haka, last edited February 10, 2012 by Julie Smith David 
    819 Views, 5 Comments
    section:
    IX. Nomination and Elections Procedures.
    current bylaws:

    A list of the nominations made by the Committee on Nominations shall be published approximately ninety (90) days prior to the beginning of the election. Additional nominations may be made by a petition signed by not less than one hundred (100) members of the Association submitted to the Executive Director at least forty-five (45) days prior to the beginning of the election. Persons so nominated must previously have agreed to serve if elected. The membership of the Association shall be notified prior to the election of the nominations made by petition.

    Election shall take place by mail, facsimile, or electronic vote of the members.

    proposed changes:

    X.  Nomination and Elections Procedures.

    A list of the nominations made by the Committee on Nominations and the Council shall be published approximately ninety (90) days prior to the beginning of the election. Additional nominations may be made by a petition signed by not less than one hundred (100) members of the Association submitted to the Executive Director at least forty-five (45) days prior to the beginning of the election. Persons so nominated must previously have agreed to serve if elected. The membership of the Association shall be notified prior to the election of the nominations made by petition.

    Election shall take place by mail, facsimile, or electronic vote of the members.

    rationale:

    No changes made in section X,  XI, or XII except renumbering, changing terminology for consistency, and eliminating details that can be included in the policies and procedures manual.

    Comment

     

    • Paul F Williams

      For the election of the President-elect I suggest we have contested elections.  At least two people should be nominated for this position and they should be required to prepare and post a statement outlining what they plan to do for their term as President.  If we had a choice maybe more than 50 people would vote.  Observing a succession of choices between agendas is informative in its own right because it gives a reading on where the members "are at."  For a group that is part of the "information industry" we seem rather reluctant to create situations where we might actually find out what each other wants.

      • Susan Haka

        Thanks for your comments Paul.

        Regarding the contested election for the president-elect position, I am sympathetic with your views. However, I witnessed first hand the downside of contested elections. Let me explain. The Management Accounting Section went through a time period where they chose to have contested elections. I served during that time on the MAS nominating committee. The ill feelings generated by asking people to put themselves forward for these challenging positions and then get rejected was eventually considered not worth the cost.

        Another signal that the demand for contested elections is not particularly high among the membership is that the current and proposed bylaws have the provision for any member to be nominated for any of the EC positions including president-elect. The hurdle for this nomination is not (in my opinion) particularly high (100 members must sign a petition). The history I believe is that there has been only one nominee through this process (I believe it was for VP Education).

        Finally, the proposed bylaws revision allows significantly more input from council with direct nominations for EC outside of the current nominating committee process.

        These changes might be able to allow for more broad membership input without the downside risk to individuals who are willing to undertake Executive Committee roles.

    • Paul F Williams

      P.S. Since TAR is so important to careers and what the academic standards are for every member of the association we should elect this person, too.  This is one of the major bones of contention on diversity and the selection process now seems to be one based on selecting people who have been good at what the previous editors and the editorial boards they selected thought was good.  That's a formula for ossification -- TAR reproduces itself year, after year, after year.  How else do you explain the explosion in journals coming from the sections?  Universities are organized around colleges that contain departments.  We have every department publishing its own journal when perhaps we should be thinking about publishing our research along the line of colleges.  NC State has 66 departments, but only 10 colleges, so there is somemerit to thinking about that.  The TAR problem over the years has been the reason for the explosive inefficiency by which we get our research out to the public.  It has to be fixed.

      • Susan Haka

        TAR is important not only to the careers of many individuals, but also is the lifeblood of the AAA. Many of the intitatives the executive committee has been able to undertake in recent years (including the AAACommons) is a direct result of the reputation of TAR (and the associated revenues). Such a reputation requires a successful editorial process, editor, and editorial board.

        The Publications Committee, who solicits nominees for editorial positions for all AAA level journals, often has considerable difficulty in persuading individuals to put their names forward to be considered as an editor. A similar problem that occurs sometimes in contested elections can occur with those willing to be considered for editorial positions.

        The Publications Committee persuades a minimum of three candidates to be considered and the Executive Committee decides on the editor elect. Those who put their names forward and are not chosen often make a point to say don't come calling to me again. The downside risk of gearing up to put your name in contention and then finding you are not chosen is painful and results in the loss of talented people who are unwilling to go through such a process again.

        Paul regarding the other issues you mention about too many journals that are too narrow is not just specific to accounting or colleges of business...these are wide-spread societal issues.

    • Donald Larry Crumbley

      See attached document.