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    Will the iPad change things (2.0)?
    blog entry posted August 30, 2011 by Julie Smith David, last edited May 5, 2012 
    7240 Views, 24 Comments
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    Will the iPad change things (2.0)?
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    inkling 2.0 One of the most viewed posts on the AAACommons is an earlier blog entry on whether the iPad will change anything... there have been over 1,100 views of the post, and over 50 comments (with huge thanks to Bob Jensen for continuing to update the conversation!).

    Today I saw a new blog post on Inkling 2.0 that I thought I should share - and that will take us to a new round of discussions on this topic.  Inkling is a digital publications organization that has taken a very serious and creative approach to designing college textbooks to capitalize on the power of the iPad.  

    Click "more..." below to learn about the new addition and to post your thoughts on how the iPad and other tablets are changing what YOU do!

    more:

    Their new edition not only supports 3-d graphics (imagine economics graphs, break even analysis, and sophisticated statistical analysis for fraud detection... I could go on and on), video (need your students to understand manufacturing for ABC costing?  Done!) and modules of content, but it also supports "social."  Much like Kindle books, now other students notes and highlights are being aggregated and made available to content consumers.  I can imagine a market for great note takers that I could follow to provide a "cliff notes" view of the text.

    So, if you have 5 minutes, take a look at the video in this article, and then let us know what you think... Could we, as a community, create a great body of accounting materials for our students, learning from these techniques?  What about the AAA journal collection - what might that look like in the future?

    Comment

    • Robert E Jensen

      "Higher-Ed Gadget-Watchers React to Amazon’s New ‘Kindle Fire’ Tablet," by Jeffrey R. Young, Chronicle of Higher Education, September 28, 2011 ---
      http://chronicle.com/blogs/wiredcampus/higher-ed-gadget-watchers-react-to-amazons-new-kindle-fire-tablet/33433?sid=wc&utm_source=wc&utm_medium=en

      Today Amazon unveiled a new tablet computer, the company’s long-awaited competitor to Apple’s iPad. Though it won’t go on sale until November, some gadget-happy college professors and administrators are already speculating about the impact it will have on campuses.

      The big surprise in today’s announcement was the tablet’s price: $199. That’s far less than the lowest-cost iPad, which sells for $499. Amazon named its new gadget the Kindle Fire, and it is smaller than the iPad, measuring about 7 inches (compared with the iPad’s 10-inch screen), so it more easily fits in one hand. It is powered by a processor on par with the chip in Apple’s iPad 2, and it runs a modified version of Google’s Android-tablet operating system. Amazon’s offering is missing some features of the iPad, though. For instance, it has no camera (there are two on the iPad 2) and no 3G antenna (which is an option on the iPad).

      Previous iPad competitors have failed to win substantial fan bases, but the Kindle Fire has one key advantage over previous entrants. The new tablet seamlessly links to Amazon’s extensive marketplace of books, software apps, movies, and television shows, letting users access content (and spend money) with a simple tap of the finger.

      Many education-technology officials have been enthusiastic about tablet computers, hoping the lightweight devices might work better in classroom settings than do laptops. Textbook publishers have also cheered tablet computers, hoping they will lift e-textbook sales.

      Here are some reactions by education-technology leaders posted today on Twitter and on blogs:

      • “Finally, college students have a cheaper iPad alternative. Finally, at long last, something to appease the student market.” —Zack Whittaker, ZD Net (reposted by Ray Schroeder, director of the University of Illinois at Springfield’s Center for Online Learning, Research, and Service, on his Online Learning Update blog).
         
      • “Great price and form factor. Will it support PDF’s and annotations is the question.” —Jeremy D. Franklin, a graduate student at the University of Utah studying the sociology of higher education, on Twitter.
      • “Use of Fire for e-textbooks is an obvious plus. Seems a little limited beyond that—a lot depends on what their browser will do.” —Robert Talbert, a mathematician and educator affiliated with the mathematics department at Grand Valley State University, and a Chronicle Network blogger, on Twitter.
      • “Kindles are going to be more common on campuses than cheap beer… I really think it has the potential to make tablet computing a mainstream activity on college campuses.” —Shep McAllister, on the blog Hack College.

      Bob Jensen's threads on Tricks and Tools of the Trade ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/000aaa/thetools.htm

    • Robert E Jensen

      "Colleges Take Varied Approaches to iPad Experiments, With Mixed Results," by Alexandra Rice, Chronicle of Higher Education, October 19, 2011 ---
      http://chronicle.com/blogs/wiredcampus/colleges-take-varied-approaches-to-ipad-experiments-with-mixed-results/33749?sid=wc&utm_source=wc&utm_medium=en

      Bob Jensen's threads on education technology ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/000aaa/0000start.htm

      Bob Jensen's threads on tricks and tools of the trade ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/000aaa/thetools.htm

    • Robert E Jensen

      I hope you watched CBS 60 Minutes on October23, 2011
      Following an informative segment on the life of Steve Jobs (he was much more of an unbathing mystic hippie than I realized), there was an even better segment on the impact of the iPad on many autistic people (not just children, but it's best to try them on iPads as early as possible). Note that the iPad is not a magic bullet for all people afflicted with autism. But for some the touch screen using some amazing autism apps became a miracle that allows them to communicate what has heretofore been locked inside their heads. The iPad for some is an amazing way for them to reveal their talents and their emotions. Also note the recent discoveries using brain scans of autism victims.

      I still have no incentive myself to invest the time and money in an iPad, although I should perhaps begin testing some apps that might be relevant for my life and work. But for autistic victims and their families, it's grossly negligent not to try out iPads. Note that it may be best to also have teachers specially trained in both iPad apps and autism rather than just starting an autistic person out cold with an iPad.

      The video segment entitled "Studying autism and iPads" is for a short time available free at
      http://www.cbsnews.com/video/watch/?id=7385702n&tag=cbsnewsMainColumnArea.1
      This is a fantastic module as long as you realize they might've cherry picked the success cases.

      The earlier segment "Steve Jobs: Revelations from a tech giant" us fir a short time available free at
      http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-18560_162-20124391/steve-jobs-revelations-from-a-tech-giant/?tag=contentMain;cbsCarousel
      Note that he was not a particularly good manager of people and did some mean things in his life. This segment illustrates how even our heroes have their imperfections.

    • Robert E Jensen

      "Apple secretly working on wearable, Siri-compatible computers," by Sam Oliver, Apple Insider, December 19, 2011 ---
      http://www.appleinsider.com/articles/11/12/19/nyt_apple_secretly_working_on_wearable_siri_compatible_computers.html

      Bob Jensen's threads on ubiquitous computing ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/ubiquit.htm

    • Robert E Jensen

      "Working In Word, Excel, PowerPoint on an iPad," by Walter S. Mossberg, The Wall Street Journal, January 12, 2012 ---
      http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970203436904577154840906816210.html?mod=WSJ_Tech_RightMostPopular

      Although Apple's popular iPad tablet has been able to replace laptops for many tasks, it isn't a big hit with folks who'd like to use it to create or edit long Microsoft Office documents.

      While Microsoft has released a number of apps for the iPad, it hasn't yet released an iPad version of Office. There are a number of valuable apps that can create or edit Office documents, such as Quickoffice Pro, Documents To Go and the iPad version of Apple's own iWork suite. But their fidelity with Office documents created on a Windows PC or a Mac isn't perfect.

      This week, Onlive Inc., in Palo Alto, Calif., is releasing an app that brings the full, genuine Windows versions of the key Office productivity apps—Word, Excel and PowerPoint—to the iPad. And it's free. These are the real programs. They look and work just like they do on a real Windows PC. They let you create or edit genuine Word documents, Excel spreadsheets and PowerPoint presentations.

      I've been testing a pre-release version of this new app, called OnLive Desktop, which the company says will be available in the next few days in Apple's app store. More information is at desktop.onlive.com.

      My verdict is that it works, but with some caveats, limitations and rough edges. Some of these downsides are inherent in the product, while others have to do with the mismatch between the iPad's touch interface and the fact that Office for Windows was primarily designed for a physical keyboard and mouse.

      Creating or editing long documents on a tablet with a virtual on-screen keyboard is a chore, no matter what Office-type app you choose. So, although it isn't a requirement, I strongly recommend that users of OnLive Desktop employ one of the many add-on wireless keyboards for the iPad.

      OnLive Desktop is a cloud-based app. That means it doesn't actually install Office on your iPad. It acts as a gateway to a remote server where Windows 7, and the three Office apps, are actually running. You create an account, sign in, and Windows pops up on your iPad, with icons allowing you to launch Word, Excel or PowerPoint. (There are also a few other, minor Windows programs included, like Notepad, Calculator and Paint.)

      In my tests, the Office apps launched and worked smoothly and quickly, without any noticeable lag, despite the fact that they were operating remotely. Although this worked better for me on my fast home Internet connection, it also worked pretty well on a much slower hotel connection.

      Like Office itself, the documents you create or modify don't live on the iPad. Instead, they go to a cloud-based repository, a sort of virtual hard disk. When you sign into OnLive Desktop, you see your documents in the standard Windows documents folder, which is actually on the remote server. The company says that this document storage won't be available until a few days after the app becomes available.

      To get files into and out of OnLive Desktop, you log into a Web site on your PC or Mac, where you see all the documents you've saved to your cloud repository. You can use this Web site to upload and download files to your OnLive Desktop account. Any changes made will be automatically synced, the company says, though I wasn't able to test that capability in my pre-release version.

      Because it's a cloud-based service, OnLive Desktop won't work offline, such as in planes without Wi-Fi. And it can be finicky about network speeds. It requires a wireless network with at least 1 megabit per second of download speed, and works best with at least 1.5 to 2.0 megabits. Many hotels have trouble delivering those speeds, and, in my tests, the app refused to start in a hotel twice, claiming insufficient network speed when the hotel Wi-Fi was overloaded.

      The free version of the app has some other limitations. You get just 2 gigabytes of file storage, there's no Web browser or email program like Outlook included, and you can't install additional software. If many users are trying to log onto the OnLive Desktop servers at once, you may have to wait your turn to use Office.

      In the coming weeks, the company plans to launch a Pro version, which will cost $10 a month. It will offer 50 GB of cloud document storage, "priority" access to the servers, a Web browser, and the ability to install some added programs. It will also allow you to collaborate on documents with other users, or even to chat with, and present material to, groups of other OnLive Desktop users.

      The company also plans to offer OnLive Desktop on Android tablets, PCs and Macs, and iPhones.

      In my tests, I was able to create documents on an iPad in each of the three cloud-based Office programs. I was able to download them to a computer, and alter them on both the iPad and computer. I was also able to upload files from the computer for use in OnLive Desktop.

      OnLive Desktop can't use the iPad's built-in virtual keyboard, but it can use the virtual keyboard built into Windows 7 and Windows' limited touch features and handwriting recognition. As noted above, I recommend using a wireless physical keyboard. But even these aren't a perfect solution, because the ones that work with the iPad can't send common Windows keyboard commands to OnLive Desktop, so you wind up moving between the keyboard and the touch screen, which can be frustrating. And you can't use a mouse.

      Another drawback is that OnLive Desktop is entirely isolated from the rest of the iPad. Unlike Office-compatible apps that install directly on the tablet, this cloud-based service can't, for instance, be used to open Office documents you receive via email on the iPad. And, at least at first, the only way you can get files into and out of OnLive Desktop is through its Web-accessible cloud-storage service. The free version has no email capability, and the app doesn't support common file-transfer services like Dropbox or SugarSync. The company says it hopes to add those.

      OnLive Desktop competes not only with the iPad's Office clones, but with iPad apps that let you remotely access and control your own PCs and Macs, and thus use Office and other computer software on those.

      Continued in article

      Bob Jensen's threads in Tricks and Tools of the Trade ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/000aaa/thetools.htm

       


    • Robert E Jensen

      Video Tutorial
      "Windows on an Ipad," MIT's Technology Review, January 30, 2012 ---
      http://www.technologyreview.com/video/?vid=796&nlid=nldly&nld=2012-01-31

      Bob Jensen's threads on Tools and Tricks of the Trade ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/000aaa/thetools.htm

       

    • Robert E Jensen

      A USB Port of Sorts for the mobile phones, iPads, Kindle Fires, and other tablet computers
      "For iPad And Mobile Devices, a 'Port' out of the Norm," by Water S. Mossberg, The Wall Street Journal, February 9, 2012 ---
      http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970204136404577211141651710950.html

      The pocket-size USB flash drive has become nearly ubiquitous in the PC world, for moving files among machines and for adding extra storage. But it can't be used with most tablets because they lack standard USB ports. 

      Now, there's a special, modified, pocket flash drive that works as usual with PCs and Macs, but can transfer and stream files to popular mobile devices without standard USB ports, such as Apple's iPad and iPhone, Amazon's Kindle Fire and many other Android devices. Its secret: It has built-in Wi-Fi to beam the files to and from tablets and smartphones wirelessly. It can even stream files like videos to many devices simultaneously.

      It's called the AirStash and is made by a tiny company called Wearable Inc., and distributed by Maxell Corp. It's available at Amazon.com and a few other retailers for $150 for an 8 gigabyte model, which can increase the storage capacity of a base iPad by 50%. An AirStash model with 16 gigabytes is $180.

      The AirStash is a clever device that solves a genuine problem, though not without some issues. In my tests, it worked as advertised, without crashing or exhibiting bugs. But it's pricey and has one big drawback: When a device is connected to the AirStash via Wi-Fi, it can't be connected to the Internet. The company plans a fix for that as early as next month.

      The AirStash looks like other USB flash drives, except a bit wider. Its storage is provided by a removable SD memory card that pops into the bottom edge. You can substitute your own larger card. In fact, you can swap in the memory card from your camera and beam your photos. [PTECH] Wearable Inc.

      The AirStash drive with removable SD memory card

      This product is aimed at the iPad and iPhone, and the company has a free app for those products that makes it easy to manage and view the files on the drive. But its wireless file transfers also work, via the Web browser, on non-Apple devices, even computers. And the company plans an Android version of the app.

      A typical way to use the AirStash would be to first plug it into your computer like any flash drive and copy onto it photos, documents, videos, podcasts or songs. Then remove it from the computer and press a small button on the front of the AirStash that turns on its Wi-Fi network. Next, you connect your iPad to this network, launch the AirStash app and all the files on the drive show up.

      Enlarge Image PTECH-JUMP PTECH-JUMP Wearable Inc.

      The AirStash app allows an iPad to wirelessly import photos from the drive.

      Enlarge Image PTECH-JUMP PTECH-JUMP Wearable Inc.

      The AirStash app allows an iPad to create a new directory on the drive, below.

      From the app, you can view documents, play songs, watch videos, view photos or listen to podcasts. On a non-Apple device, there's no special app, but you can still access the content on the drive. You just link up to the AirStash Wi-Fi network, launch your Web browser and go to airstash.net. A page appears with a list of the drive's contents.

      AirStash performed some feats I found impressive. In one test, I was able, from about 75 feet away, to flawlessly watch three movies stored on the AirStash at the same time on three devices. I had "Inception" playing on an iPad; "The King's Speech" playing on a Kindle Fire; and "Star Trek" playing on a Dell laptop. I stress, none of these movies was stored on the devices—all were stored on the AirStash.

      In another test, I was able to watch a movie on an iPad, play a song on an Android-based Motorola Droid and read a PDF file on a Mac, simultaneously. Once again, all these files were stored on an AirStash drive 75 feet away.

      The AirStash can beam material to as many as eight devices at once, except for video, where the limit is three devices. It can beam the same video to three devices at the same time. A parent could use one AirStash to provide different videos to each of three kids during a drive in the car.

      Wearable, the maker of the AirStash, boasts it works in both directions: You can also write files to the AirStash from a device like an iPad. Technically, this is true. For instance, from the AirStash app, you can export photos stored on an iPad or iPhone to the drive.

      But several iPad apps for viewing or editing documents, which the company says work with AirStash, require a geeky setup process, and I couldn't get them to send edited documents back to the drive.

      There are some other limitations. For instance, on non-Apple devices, the Web interface is rudimentary, and on the Kindle Fire, music can't be streamed from the AirStash.

      Continued in article

      Video Tutorial
      "Windows on an Ipad," MIT's Technology Review, January 30, 2012 ---
      http://www.technologyreview.com/video/?vid=796&nlid=nldly&nld=2012-01-31

      "Working In Word, Excel, PowerPoint on an iPad," by Walter S. Mossberg, The Wall Street Journal, January 12, 2012 ---
      http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970203436904577154840906816210.html?mod=WSJ_Tech_RightMostPopular

      Although Apple's popular iPad tablet has been able to replace laptops for many tasks, it isn't a big hit with folks who'd like to use it to create or edit long Microsoft Office documents.

      While Microsoft has released a number of apps for the iPad, it hasn't yet released an iPad version of Office. There are a number of valuable apps that can create or edit Office documents, such as Quickoffice Pro, Documents To Go and the iPad version of Apple's own iWork suite. But their fidelity with Office documents created on a Windows PC or a Mac isn't perfect.

      This week, Onlive Inc., in Palo Alto, Calif., is releasing an app that brings the full, genuine Windows versions of the key Office productivity apps—Word, Excel and PowerPoint—to the iPad. And it's free. These are the real programs. They look and work just like they do on a real Windows PC. They let you create or edit genuine Word documents, Excel spreadsheets and PowerPoint presentations.

      I've been testing a pre-release version of this new app, called OnLive Desktop, which the company says will be available in the next few days in Apple's app store. More information is at desktop.onlive.com.

      My verdict is that it works, but with some caveats, limitations and rough edges. Some of these downsides are inherent in the product, while others have to do with the mismatch between the iPad's touch interface and the fact that Office for Windows was primarily designed for a physical keyboard and mouse.

      Creating or editing long documents on a tablet with a virtual on-screen keyboard is a chore, no matter what Office-type app you choose. So, although it isn't a requirement, I strongly recommend that users of OnLive Desktop employ one of the many add-on wireless keyboards for the iPad.

      OnLive Desktop is a cloud-based app. That means it doesn't actually install Office on your iPad. It acts as a gateway to a remote server where Windows 7, and the three Office apps, are actually running. You create an account, sign in, and Windows pops up on your iPad, with icons allowing you to launch Word, Excel or PowerPoint. (There are also a few other, minor Windows programs included, like Notepad, Calculator and Paint.)

      In my tests, the Office apps launched and worked smoothly and quickly, without any noticeable lag, despite the fact that they were operating remotely. Although this worked better for me on my fast home Internet connection, it also worked pretty well on a much slower hotel connection.

      Like Office itself, the documents you create or modify don't live on the iPad. Instead, they go to a cloud-based repository, a sort of virtual hard disk. When you sign into OnLive Desktop, you see your documents in the standard Windows documents folder, which is actually on the remote server. The company says that this document storage won't be available until a few days after the app becomes available.

      To get files into and out of OnLive Desktop, you log into a Web site on your PC or Mac, where you see all the documents you've saved to your cloud repository. You can use this Web site to upload and download files to your OnLive Desktop account. Any changes made will be automatically synced, the company says, though I wasn't able to test that capability in my pre-release version.

      Because it's a cloud-based service, OnLive Desktop won't work offline, such as in planes without Wi-Fi. And it can be finicky about network speeds. It requires a wireless network with at least 1 megabit per second of download speed, and works best with at least 1.5 to 2.0 megabits. Many hotels have trouble delivering those speeds, and, in my tests, the app refused to start in a hotel twice, claiming insufficient network speed when the hotel Wi-Fi was overloaded.

      The free version of the app has some other limitations. You get just 2 gigabytes of file storage, there's no Web browser or email program like Outlook included, and you can't install additional software. If many users are trying to log onto the OnLive Desktop servers at once, you may have to wait your turn to use Office.

      In the coming weeks, the company plans to launch a Pro version, which will cost $10 a month. It will offer 50 GB of cloud document storage, "priority" access to the servers, a Web browser, and the ability to install some added programs. It will also allow you to collaborate on documents with other users, or even to chat with, and present material to, groups of other OnLive Desktop users.

      The company also plans to offer OnLive Desktop on Android tablets, PCs and Macs, and iPhones.

      In my tests, I was able to create documents on an iPad in each of the three cloud-based Office programs. I was able to download them to a computer, and alter them on both the iPad and computer. I was also able to upload files from the computer for use in OnLive Desktop.

      OnLive Desktop can't use the iPad's built-in virtual keyboard, but it can use the virtual keyboard built into Windows 7 and Windows' limited touch features and handwriting recognition. As noted above, I recommend using a wireless physical keyboard. But even these aren't a perfect solution, because the ones that work with the iPad can't send common Windows keyboard commands to OnLive Desktop, so you wind up moving between the keyboard and the touch screen, which can be frustrating. And you can't use a mouse.

      Another drawback is that OnLive Desktop is entirely isolated from the rest of the iPad. Unlike Office-compatible apps that install directly on the tablet, this cloud-based service can't, for instance, be used to open Office documents you receive via email on the iPad. And, at least at first, the only way you can get files into and out of OnLive Desktop is through its Web-accessible cloud-storage service. The free version has no email capability, and the app doesn't support common file-transfer services like Dropbox or SugarSync. The company says it hopes to add those.

      OnLive Desktop competes not only with the iPad's Office clones, but with iPad apps that let you remotely access and control your own PCs and Macs, and thus use Office and other computer software on those.

      Continued in article

      Bob Jensen's threads on Tools and Tricks of the Trade ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/000aaa/thetools.htm

       

    • Robert E Jensen

      A Mobile Phone and Tablet in One Device
      "Mobile Device That's Better for a Jotter Than a Talker," by Walter S. Mossberg, The Wall Street Journal, February 16, 2012 ---
      http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970204792404577225230450572346.html

      Lots of folks carry a smartphone, and, at least some of the time, tote a second mobile device—an iPad or other tablet. But some people might prefer a product that combines the two. Similarly, many have come to love the finger-controlled interface popularized by Apple, but might prefer at times to use a stylus, a common tool in the pre-iPhone days.

      Samsung is hoping to offer all of the above. On Sunday, it's introducing to the U.S. a phone-tablet hybrid with a large 5.3-inch screen that uses a stylus as well as your fingers. It's called the Galaxy Note and costs $300 with a two-year AT&T contract.

      While the Note could be mistaken for a small tablet, Samsung insists it's a phone that merely offers some of the roominess of a tablet. And in fact, it runs the last purely phone-oriented version of Google's Android operating system, called Gingerbread. This product positioning may be due to bad memories of another company's effort to sell such a 'tweener: Dell's 5-inch Streak, which was marketed as a tablet that could make calls and failed miserably in 2010.

      After testing the Galaxy Note, I have decidedly mixed feelings about it. It isn't a very practical phone and, as a tablet, it can't match the experience of the iPad, which is more spacious and has over 150,000 apps designed for it. However, I can see where some folks might consider the 5-inch screen a good trade-off for much better portability than other tablets, and Samsung has done some very interesting work in making the stylus, which is stored in a slot on the device, useful.

      As a mobile phone, the Galaxy Note is positively gargantuan. It's almost 6 inches long and over 3 inches wide. When you hold it up to your ear, it pretty much covers the entire side of your face. You look like you're talking into a piece of toast.

      The Note is so big, an iPhone can almost fit within its display. And it dwarfs even the more-bloated crop of recent Android phones, like Samsung's own Galaxy S II series, whose screen can be as large as 4.5 inches. And while it can fit into a large pocket or handbag, the Note isn't going to slip unobtrusively into your jeans or a small purse. It weighs 6.28 ounces, nearly 30% more than the iPhone and nearly 50% more than some Galaxy S II models.

      For people who use Bluetooth earpieces all the time, or who primarily use the speakerphone function, the Note's size may not be a problem. But for the rest, the Note is just too large to go without a more reasonably sized phone, which defeats the one-device argument.

      Voice quality in normal use was good. But, in my limited tests of its Bluetooth voice capabilities, the caller on the other end felt the Note sounded significantly worse than the iPhone or other Android models I've tested.

      However, as a data device, I liked the Note a lot. Its screen sports a high resolution that made photos, videos and text look very good. It uses AT&T's high-speed LTE data network, where available, and in my tests it was very fast. The larger screen enabled more of a Web page to be visible without scrolling than on typical phones.

      Like all Android devices, it has fewer, and, in my opinion, generally lower-quality third-party apps than the iPhone. But those I tried worked well. The Note was consistently speedy and responsive.

      The 8-megapixel rear camera and 2-megapixel front camera both did a good job. Photos and videos I shot from the rear camera were excellent. But I found the sheer size of the Note undercuts its convenience as a camera and there's no dedicated camera button or quick way to launch the camera when the screen is locked, as there is on some other phones.

      In moderate mixed use, where I played music and videos, surfed the Web, texted, used email constantly and took pictures, the Note's battery lasted more than a full day between charges.

      Unlike Apple, Samsung allowed AT&T to load a bunch of its own apps you might not want on the Note, like a $10 to $15 a month program for locating family members via cellphone GPS. A particularly egregious example is a Yellow Pages app that's jammed into the very top of your contact list.

      Another drawback: While other Android phones I've tested can be plugged into either a PC or a Mac so you can manually transfer files onto them, I couldn't get the Note to do this with either of two Macs I tested with it. It did work with Windows machines.

      The stylus is a big plus, at least for users who like to jot down notes, create sketches or annotate documents in a way that's much more precise than using a fingertip. Even on the iPad, which wasn't designed for a stylus, third-party styli have become quietly popular, but Samsung has taken the idea much further.

      The Note's stylus, called the S Pen, can be used instead of a finger to launch and operate apps. But that isn't its main purpose. It's meant to work closely with a special app called S Memo that allows you to take notes or make sketches. These can be saved or shared via email or text messaging, or uploaded to sites like Facebook. They can include photos or typed text.

      The software allows the stylus to draw in different colors and widths and to emulate a brush or marker.

      Continued in article

      Bob Jensen's threads on gadgets ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/Bookbob4.htm#Technology

       

    • Robert E Jensen

      iPad 3 Video --- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K8ecN36Ffpc

      "The New iPad: It’s in the Apps," by David Pogue, The New York Times, March 7, 2012 ---
      http://pogue.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/03/07/the-new-ipad-its-in-the-apps/

      At one of Apple’s trademark press events here,  Tim Cook, the chief executive, took to the stage to unveil this year’s iPad — and a few other surprises.

      I’m calling it “this year’s iPad” because it has no other distinguishing name. Apple says the name is not “iPad 3,” even though the previous model was called the iPad 2. And it’s not “iPad HD,” even though its new retina screen has higher resolution than a high-definition TV screen.

      I played with it a little Wednesday and I will be doing an extensive review later. For now, here are a few first impressions.

      In addition to the retina display, it has:
      • a faster processor chip
      • a better camera (a five-megapixel)
      • 1080p hi-definition video recording (with stabilization)
      • voice dictation (speak-to-type — not, however, the whole Siri voice-command feature)
      • Personal Hotspot (pay your carrier an extra monthly fee; the iPad broadcasts its Internet signal to nearby laptops and other gadgets over Wi-Fi, wherever you are, even in a car)
      • 4G LTE, which means super-high Internet speeds in cities where Verizon Wireless and AT&T have installed 4G networks.

      The prices, storage and battery life are identical to the previous iPads’. Which is impressive — 4G is famous as a battery hog. That’s why this new iPad is a tiny bit thicker and heavier than the last one; it needs a beefier battery.

      That wasn’t the only news during the unveiling. Apple also revealed that its $100 Apple TV would get a minor upgrade on March 16. It will be able to play movies in 1080p high definition, and it will have a new icon-based software design.

      Oh — and movies you buy from Apple’s online store are now available in an online iCloud locker, available for viewing on any Apple gadget, just as music and TV shows are.

      To me, though, the most interesting developments were the new apps that Apple has developed for the iPad, iPhone and iPod Touch.

      GarageBand, for example, has been blessed with several new music-making features. One of them lets up to four people play different instruments simultaneously. Somehow, their four touchscreen devices stay synchronized over Wi-Fi, and they make a master, perfectly synced four-track recording, ready for mixing, editing (there’s a new note-by-note editing mode) and posting online.

      My favorite, if Apple’s demo was any indication, will be iPhoto for iOS. (Like GarageBand, it’s a $5 download. GarageBand is a free upgrade if you bought an earlier iOS version..)

      In some ways, it goes beyond iPhoto for the Mac, in that its editing tools can do more than affect an entire photo in one swoop. It offers brushes that let you dab with your fingers to brighten, darken, saturate, desaturate or otherwise enhance individual parts of a photo. That’s something you can do in Photoshop, but it’s never been possible in iPhoto. Multitouch is used cleverly; for example, with two fingers you can rotate a photo, zoom in and out, adjust the shadowy “vignette” framing, and so on.

      Continued in article

      Jensen Comment
      I sure would've liked USB and VGA ports.

      Humorous iPad Demo --- http://biggeekdad.com/2012/02/ipad-magic-demonstration/
      Amazing things you never thought of trying with your iPad.

      Bob Jensen's threads on Tricks and Tools of the Trade ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/000aaa/thetools.htm

       

    • Robert E Jensen

      iPad App Video (free) :  Personalized Feedback With ScreenChomp ---
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=igp7rHZRg4M&feature=youtu.be
      Thank you Richard Campbell for the heads up

      Bob Jensen's threads on tools and tricks of the trade ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/000aaa/thetools.htm

    • Robert E Jensen

      Styluses for the iPad

      "The Moving Finger writes: and, having writ,
      Moves on: nor all thy Piety nor Wit
      Shall lure it back to cancel half a Line,
      Nor all thy Tears wash out a Word of it."
      Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam

      Moving Finger versus Stylus
      "The iPad Isn't Ready for Working by Hand," by Jon Mitchell, ReadWriteWeb, April 7, 2012 ---
      http://www.readwriteweb.com/archives/the_ipad_isnt_ready_for_working_by_hand.php

      Last week's release of Paper for iPad was a huge boon to the cottage industry of third-party iPad styluses. It was hardly the first app for drawing or writing directly on the screen of an iOS device, but it struck a chord. It was just the right blend of skeuomorphic real-world design and familiar iOS gestures. I had never even considered a stylus before, but this seemed like my chance.

      I travel the Internet in fairly Apple-obsessed early-adopter circles, so I went with the stylus I'd seen recommended most often: the Cosmonaut by Studio Neat. Studio Neat made the Glif camera mount, one of the most celebrated iPhone peripherals around, so it seemed like a safe bet.

      The Cosmonaut arrived in short order in spartan, Space Race packaging. It's fairly wide to hold like a pen. It's black, grippy and dense, the exact same length as an iPhone. The business end exhibits the capacitive properties the touch screen requires: a soft touch that gives way gradually to pressure, just like a fingertip, but more precise.

      Continued in article

      Bob Jensen's threads on Tools and Tricks of the Trade ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/000aaa/thetools.htm

       

    • Robert E Jensen

      Styluses for the iPad

      "The Moving Finger writes: and, having writ,
      Moves on: nor all thy Piety nor Wit
      Shall lure it back to cancel half a Line,
      Nor all thy Tears wash out a Word of it."
      Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam

      Moving Finger versus Stylus
      "The iPad Isn't Ready for Working by Hand," by Jon Mitchell, ReadWriteWeb, April 7, 2012 ---
      http://www.readwriteweb.com/archives/the_ipad_isnt_ready_for_working_by_hand.php

      Last week's release of Paper for iPad was a huge boon to the cottage industry of third-party iPad styluses. It was hardly the first app for drawing or writing directly on the screen of an iOS device, but it struck a chord. It was just the right blend of skeuomorphic real-world design and familiar iOS gestures. I had never even considered a stylus before, but this seemed like my chance.

      I travel the Internet in fairly Apple-obsessed early-adopter circles, so I went with the stylus I'd seen recommended most often: the Cosmonaut by Studio Neat. Studio Neat made the Glif camera mount, one of the most celebrated iPhone peripherals around, so it seemed like a safe bet.

      The Cosmonaut arrived in short order in spartan, Space Race packaging. It's fairly wide to hold like a pen. It's black, grippy and dense, the exact same length as an iPhone. The business end exhibits the capacitive properties the touch screen requires: a soft touch that gives way gradually to pressure, just like a fingertip, but more precise.

      Continued in article

      Bob Jensen's threads on Tools and Tricks of the Trade ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/000aaa/thetools.htm

       

    • Robert E Jensen

      More on the Rotten Apple

      "Justice Dept. Sues Apple and Major Publishers in E-Book Price-Fixing Case," by Nick DeSantis, Chronicle of Higher Education, April 11, 2012 --- Click Here
      http://chronicle.com/blogs/wiredcampus/justice-depart-sues-apple-and-major-publishers-in-e-book-price-fixing-case/36025?sid=wc&utm_source=wc&utm_medium=en

      The Rotten Apple iBooks ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/Ebooks.htm#iBooks

      Bob Jensen's threads on Ebooks ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/Ebooks.htm

    • Robert E Jensen

      "Microsoft, Nook and the B&N College Bookstore Potential," by Joshua Kim, Inside Higher Ed, May 1, 2012 ---
      http://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/technology-and-learning/microsoft-nook-and-bn-college-bookstore-potential

      This deal could either mean very little or quite a bit for higher ed, depending on how committed Microsoft is to education. Barnes & Noble has 641 college bookstores. Someday soon these bookstores will stop selling dead tree textbooks. Every book, article and textbook on your syllabus will be digital.  

      How will the college bookstore survive when students no longer need to visit to buy (or sell back) new or used books? Maybe they will transform into sellers of cappuccinos, logo sweatshirts, and other university branded tchotchkes - although this future is almost too depressing to contemplate.

      What Microsoft could decide to do would be to double down on its $1.7 billion investment in the Nook division and use the Nook and all those B&N college bookstores to build out an educational ecosystem. This would undoubtedly involve taking an equity stake in the parent B&N company, and then working with the bookseller to turn the B&N college bookstores into Microsoft / Nook education solutions centers. 

      The Nook investment could be a first step that will enable Microsoft to think seriously about how its products and services could compete with Apple and Amazon to deliver services, hardware and content directly to students.   

      Some missing pieces would need to be filled in. The first thing Microsoft should do is purchase a coursepack company. XanEdu and Study.net would be the top contenders, although maybe others should be looked at. A coursepack company has expertise in clearing permissions and delivering articles and book chapters for classes. Coursepacks, like everything else, are migrating away from paper and towards digital - and the Nook could be a terrific platform for this service.

      Next Microsoft should purchase a digital textbook company. Inkling seems like the best bet - as they have some great buzz and are gaining investment and market traction. A Windows powered Nook will be coming, and a company like Inkling would help ensure cutting edge design as well as content for the device.

      Continued in article

      Bob Jensen's threads on eBooks are at
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/Ebooks.htm

       

    • Robert E Jensen

      "Amazon's Kindle Fire Sales Fizzle in 2012, Market Share Slips to Third," by Joe Brockmeier, ReadWriteWeb, May 4, 2012 ---
      http://www.readwriteweb.com/mobile/2012/05/amazons-kindle-fire-sales-fizzle-in-2012-market-share-slips-to-third.php

      That Apple remains in first place in the tablet market comes as no surprise. IDC's latest research shows that in the first quarter of 2012, Amazon's once-hot Kindle Fire is struggling. According to IDC, Amazon's share dropped from nearly 17% of the tablet market to 4%, with fewer than 700,000 units sold compared to Apple's 11.8 million.
      The inexpensive Kindle Fire took off when it was introduced in late 2011, giving Amazon 16.8% of the tablet market with 4.8 million shipments. Amazon's 7-inch tablet was the right product at the right price at the right time, that being the all-important holiday season. The Fire is an inexpensive tablet that offered many of the features that people want for less than half the price of an iPad. But the Fire didn't knock people's socks off, and many of the reviews were lukewarm, at best.

      Amazon Still Trounces B&N

      Apparently, the bloom is off the rose. Amazon's Q1 sales put it behind Samsung sales of Android tablets, but still comfortably ahead of Barnes & Noble's Nook tablets. Lenovo took the fourth slot, while B&N grabbed fifth place.

      IDC predicts that Amazon will try to win back market share with the introduction of a "new larger-screened device... at a typically aggressive price point." IDC's Tom Mainelli, research director for IDC's Mobile Connected Devices group, also predicts Google will debut a tablet co-branded with ASUS.

      Lessons Learned: Price Matters, to a Point

      The lesson that Apple's tablet competitors should take from IDC's research is that price does drive sales - up to a point. The drop-off from the last quarter of 2011 to the first quarter of 2012 is far steeper than is easily explained by the end of holiday shopping. IDC had predicted overall tablet sales to be 1.2 million units higher than they were this quarter, with the shortfall mostly attributed to Amazon's slip.

      Even though Apple introduced a new iPad this year, it's continuing to sell iPad 2s at a reduced price, fending off the cheap Android tablets and defending its market share while maintaining high margins on the rest of the iPad line. Apple owned 54.7% of the market in Q4 2011, and has bumped that figure back up to 68% in Q1 2012.

      Tablet sales have grown 120% from last year, but were still lower than IDC's predictions. Whether tablet sales continue to slow in Q4 will be interesting to see.

      Continued in article