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    Overview of JIS paper: Applying Basic Gamification...
    blog entry posted February 26, 2016 by Roger S Debreceny, last edited February 26, 2016, tagged research 
    183 Views
    title:
    Overview of JIS paper: Applying Basic Gamification Techniques to IT Compliance Training
    intro text:

    A forthcoming paper in JIS is Ryan J. Baxter, D. Kip Holderness, and David A. Wood Applying Basic Gamification Techniques to IT Compliance Training: Evidence from the Lab and Field. This blog provides an overview of the paper. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.2308/isys-51341

    Ryan Baxter

    Ryan Baxter

    Kip Holderness

    Kip Holderness

    David Wood

    David Wood

    body:

    Companies use internal controls to protect and maintain the integrity of their information systems. However, internal controls are only as effective as the employees who operate them. Consequently, companies devote valuable resources to train employees on their responsibilities to safeguard company information. Most employees dislike compliance training and find the experience boring, which can lead to ineffective training.

    In an effort to improve the efficacy of training, some companies have begun incorporating basic elements of gaming into their training modules – a practice known as “gamification.” Our study makes use of a laboratory experiment using student participants and a field study using employees at a large multi-national bank to examine whether gamified training results in greater enjoyment and effectiveness than traditional, non-gamified training.

    Our participants report that gamified training is more enjoyable and interesting, and less boring than traditional, non-gamified training modalities. In addition, participants who completed the gamified training scored higher on information security knowledge assessments that those who received no training, though they did not score higher than those who received comparable non-gamified training.

    We also find that individual gaming preferences influence the effectiveness of gamified training. Specifically, we find that gamified training results in greater knowledge acquisition for “gamers,” those who participate in gaming on their own time, relative to “non-gamers.” This result was somewhat surprising, given that gamers were less impressed with gamified training than non-gamers. Our results suggest that companies need to understand the preferences of their employees when deciding on what types of training to implement.

    In summary, though gamification does not appear to be the silver bullet needed to increase both enjoyment and learning outright, it may reduce the apathy with which employees approach training, and our results suggest that it does not hinder learning. We believe that future research in this area will guide practitioners on matching the right gamification mechanics with organizational needs.