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    Attracting Applicants for In-House and Outsourced Internal...
    research summary posted April 18, 2016 by Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips, tagged 05.0 Audit Team Composition, 05.04 Staff Hiring, Turnover and Morale, 08.0 Auditing Procedures – Nature, Timing and Extent, 08.11 Reliance on Internal Auditors, 13.0 Governance, 13.07 Internal auditor role and involvement in controls and reporting 
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    Title:
    Attracting Applicants for In-House and Outsourced Internal Audit Positions: Views from External Auditors.
    Practical Implications:

    This study offers insights into why internal auditing is experiencing a shortage of qualified job candidates and offers a potential solution to the problem. The authors find that external auditors have negative perceptions about internal auditing, and these negative perceptions are associated with a (1) decreased desire to apply for internal auditing positions, (2) lower likelihood of recommending an in-house internal auditing career to high-performing students, and (3) higher likelihood of recommending an in-house internal auditing career to mediocre students. Internal auditors can try solving this problem by improving perceptions about internal auditing via a media campaign that raises awareness about the true internal audit career path.

    Citation:

    Bartlett, G.D., J. Kremin, K.K. Saunders, and D.A. Wood. 2016. Attracting Applicants for In-House and Outsourced Internal Audit Positions: Views from External Auditors. Accounting Horizons 30 (1): 143-156.

    Keywords:
    internal audit, hiring decisions, outsourcing, external auditors
    Purpose of the Study:

    The internal audit function can help organizations strengthen their risk management and corporate governance, yet the demand for qualified candidates to fill internal audit job openings exceeds the supply of interested applicants. Consequently, the internal audit function may find itself short-staffed and/or staffed with lower quality candidates, which may limit its ability to add value to the organization. In order to correct this problem, it is important to fully understand its scope and its root cause(s). Prior research attempting to gain this understanding has focused on investigating how accounting students’ beliefs about internal audit impact their interest to pursue an internal audit career. The authors of this paper extend this research by:

    • Investigating how external auditors’ beliefs about internal audit impact (1) their interest to pursue an internal audit career and (2) their recommendations to students about pursuing an internal audit career,  
    • Investigating differences in external auditor’s perceptions of in-sourced versus out-sourced internal audit, and
    • Asking external auditors to suggest what needs to be done to improve their perceptions of internal audit.
    Design/Method/ Approach:

    The authors use data from three sources. First, the authors performed an experiment using experienced external auditorsmostly seniors or associateswho were asked whether they would apply for a job described as either an accounting, in-house internal audit, or outsourced internal audit position. Second, the authors performed another experiment using experienced external auditorsmostly managers or directorswho were asked whether they would recommend that a high-performing (mediocre performer) student pursue an external audit, in-house internal audit, or outsourced internal audit career. Third, the authors surveyed high-ranking former/current external auditors who never worked in internal audit about what would make internal auditing a more appealing career for them.

    Findings:
    • When the same job opening is labeled as either accounting, in-house internal auditing, or outsourced internal auditing, the accounting label is likely to attract two times as many external auditor applicants as the other two labels.
    • External auditors are equally willing to apply for in-house internal auditing or outsourced internal auditing positions.
    • External auditors have more negative perceptions of in-house internal auditors than outsourced internal auditors.
    • External auditors have negative perceptions of the internal auditing profession. They believe that (1) others have negative stereotypes about the profession, (2) business professionals do not respect internal auditors, and (3) internal auditors do boring work.
    • Those less interested in applying for internal audit jobs have negative perceptions of internal auditing.
    • The average external auditor willing (unwilling) to apply for an internal audit position would want to receive at least 124% (149%) of his current salary before being willing to switch from his current external audit job to an internal audit job.  
    • External auditors will be most likely to recommend that top-performing students work in external audit and mediocre students work in in-house internal audit.
    • External auditors will equally recommend that top-performing students and mediocre students should consider outsourced internal audit as a second best career path.
    • External auditors have more negative perceptions of outsourced internal auditing than external auditing on most dimensions, except in regards to work-life balance. They believe that work-life balance is better for outsourced internal auditors.
    • Current and former external auditors believe that internal auditing could become more appealing if internal auditors do more interesting work, receive more respect, perform value-added tasks, receive better compensation, and have better promotion opportunities. Because internal auditors appear to already be following these suggestions, internal auditors may benefit from giving others a better understanding of internal audit careers.
    Category:
    Audit Team Composition, Auditing Procedures - Nature - Timing and Extent, Governance
    Sub-category:
    Internal auditor role and involvement in controls and reporting, Reliance on Internal Auditors, Staff Hiring - Turnover & Morale