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    Rotational internal audit programs and financial reporting...
    research summary posted October 21, 2015 by Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips, tagged 13.0 Governance, 13.07 Internal auditor role and involvement in controls and reporting, 14.0 Corporate Matters, 14.11 Audit Committee Effectiveness 
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    Title:
    Rotational internal audit programs and financial reporting quality: Do compensating controls help?
    Practical Implications:

    Results from this study suggest that rotating internal auditors into operational management programs reduces financial reporting quality. Companies that utilize a rotational internal audit program should be aware of these possible unintended consequences. Companies utilizing these programs should consider implementing several compensating controls (listed in the findings section), as the authors have found that these controls can reduce or even eliminate (if used together) the negative consequences of rotational internal audit programs.  

    Citation:

    Christ, M.H., A. Masli, N.Y. Sharp, and D.A. Wood. 2015. Rotational internal audit programs and financial reporting quality: Do compensating controls help? Accounting, Organizations and Society 44: 37-59.

    Keywords:
    internal auditing, financial reporting quality, audit committee oversight, controls
    Purpose of the Study:

    The purpose of this study is to examine unintended consequences of rotational internal audit programs. Specifically, the authors inspect how moving internal auditors out of the internal audit function and into operational management can impact financial reporting quality. In addition, the authors examine how compensating controls can mitigate the unintended consequences.

    Design/Method/ Approach:

    The authors initially utilize semi-structured interviews with audit executives and audit committee chairmen to identify how the rotational internal audit programs impact financial reporting quality. Using the information gathered, the authors test hypotheses utilizing archival data from various firms for the years 2000 to 2005.

    Findings:

    Overall, the authors find that the practice of rotating internal auditors into operational management positions is related to lower financial reporting quality. Specifically, it increases Accounting Risk (that evaluates the risk of misreporting by identifying suspicious patterns in accounting data). However, the authors find that several compensating controls can reduce this negative effect. Specifically, the authors find the effect is reduced when companies only rotate staff internal audit positions, have a more effective audit committee, and when management asks the internal audit function to have a greater role in the financial reporting process. Findings also demonstrate that including all three of these compensating controls can eliminate the unintended consequences.

    Category:
    Corporate Matters, Governance
    Sub-category:
    Audit Committee Effectiveness, Internal auditor role and involvement in controls and reporting