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    Emerging Technologies in Distance Education -- Outstanding...
    blog entry posted September 7, 2010 by Richard E Lillie, last edited May 22, 2012, tagged research 
    18720 Views, 106 Comments
    title:
    Emerging Technologies in Distance Education -- Outstanding Resource
    intro text:

    In July, 2010 AU Press (Athabasca University, Canada) published a book that I think you will find is an excellent resource for ideas about using technology in teaching and learning.  The book entitled Emerging Technologies in Distance Education is edited by George Veletsianos.

    AU Press makes the book available for free in Adobe Acrobat (.pdf) format.  You may download the entire publication or selected chapters.

    This book is worth exploring.  It may not turn you into a "pro from Dover" (to draw on the line from the movie Mash).  However, it should help you better understand how to use technology when you design course materials and share them with your students.

    Enjoy.

    Rick Lillie (Cal State, San Bernardino)

    Emerging Technologies in Distance Education

    Comment

    • Robert E Jensen

      If it grows, this may be a great opportunity for genuine experts who are good at online teaching and want to "own" and "promote"  their own courses
      "New Adjunct-Focused Venture Wins Approval to Offer Courses," by Goldie Blumenstyk, Chronicle of Higher Education, April 16, 2014 ---
      http://chronicle.com/blogs/bottomline/new-adjunct-focused-venture-wins-approval-to-offer-courses/?cid=wc&utm_source=wc&utm_medium=en

      A new for-profit education organization, designed to give more academic and financial control to the adjunct instructors who teach its online courses, has just won approval from the state of Vermont to operate.

      The Vermont State Board of Education’s approval of Oplerno (the company’s name stands for “open learning organization”) means that its courses can qualify for credit at colleges and universities, at the institutions’ discretion.

      Robert Skiff, the entrepreneur behind Oplerno, says he plans to begin offering the first classes within three weeks and to offer as many as 100 by the end of 2014. Already, he says, more than 80 faculty members have signed up to develop classes in the sciences, humanities, and social sciences.

      Under the Oplerno model, tuition per course would run from about $500 to $1,500, with a maximum of 25 students per class.  Instructors will design—and own—the content and set the price of the course, within those parameters. The instructors would then earn 80 percent to 90 percent of the revenue the class generates.

      Jensen Comment
      The key to success is for instructors to be so good that they can persuade accredited colleges and universities to offer their courses. In turn this is an opportunity for financially-strapped schools to fill in gaps in their curricula. Although in most instances transcript credit will be given for these courses, I can also anticipate that some colleges may find this to be an opportunity to provide more offerings in non-credit remedial courses.

      For example, accounting Ph.D,s are among the most highly paid faculty on campus with starting salaries now in excess of $120,000 plus summer deals. Urban colleges can generally fill in accounting faculty gaps with local experts in such areas as advanced tax, advanced accounting, auditing, and AIS. But remote colleges, like most of those in Vermont, generally do not have a pool of local experts to serve as accounting adjuncts. The above Oplerno innovative approach is a great way to fill in faculty gaps with outstanding experts, some of whom may even have Ph.D. credentials such as retired accounting faculty like me.

      Even urban schools might fill in gaps. For example, this year SMU in Dallas had a gap in faculty to teach advanced-level accounting courses. They paid my friend Tom Selling in Phoenix a generous stipend plus air fare to commute and teach regularly on the SMU campus in Dallas. Tom does have an accounting Ph.D. from OSU and research and teaching experience in several outstanding universities including Dartmouth. But he now primarily earns a living in consulting. Those weekly flights plus long taxi rides are not only expensive to SMU, but the the round trip travel times must be a real waste of time for Tom. Think of how much more efficient it would be to buy Tom's online advanced-level accounting courses if (a big IF) Tom was willing to teach online for a much higher stipend.

      I anticipate resistance from tenured faculty in some colleges and universities to this type of coverage on the grounds that it may become an excuse to not hire expensive faculty to serve on campus. However, I assume that control for each outsourced course will primarily reside within each on-campus department where local faculty generally have a lot of power in their small domains. There can be added incentives such as the spreading of performance raises and travel budgets over fewer onsite faculty.

      The main objection, a big one, will be that faculty on campus have many more responsibilities than to teach their courses. They assist in recruiting and advising students and serve on all sorts of academic and administrative committees. They are responsible for research and become a major factor in the reputations of their departments and their colleges.  They are huge factors in alumni relations and student placement. Hence, I foresee that outsourced coverage of courses will only be a small part of the curriculum of any department. It could become a means of having a better curriculum for a few courses, particularly those advanced specialty courses that are really do well with existing onsite faculty.

    • Robert E Jensen

      2U Education Technology (for-profit education courses) --- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2U_%28company%29

      "U. of Southern California and 2U Offer Online Doctoral Degree," Chronicle of Higher Education, April 23, 2014 --- Click Here
      http://chronicle.com/blogs/wiredcampus/quickwire-u-of-southern-california-and-2u-offer-online-doctoral-degree/51981?cid=wc&utm_source=wc&utm_medium=en

      Jensen Comment
      There are still some accreditation and USC final approval issues pending. But if this program becomes operational this could be the start of traditional university partnerships with for-profit companies. The first 2U venture of offering prestigious faculty online courses that were accepted by some top universities recently faltered.

      2U Distance Education Course Provider --- http://www.study2u.com/
      2U (The Anti-MOOC Provider) ---  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Educational_technology

      "3 Universities (Baylor, Southern Methodist, and Temple Universities) Will Grant Credit for 2U’s Online Courses," by Steve Kolowich, Chronicle of Higher Education, July 30, 2013 ---
      http://chronicle.com/blogs/wiredcampus/3-universities-will-grant-credit-for-2us-online-courses/45143?cid=wc&utm_source=wc&utm_medium=en

      Jensen Comment
      That was July 30, 2013. It's unclear what role the new 2U will play in terms of providing transfer credit accepted by Baylor, SUM, Temple, and other universities after May 2014.

      "2U Ends Semester Online," by Carl Straumsheim, Inside Higher Ed, April 3, 2014 ---
      http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2014/04/03/online-education-provider-2u-disband-semester-online-consortium

      The online education provider 2U will this summer eliminate its online course pool initiative in favor of developing fully online undergraduate degree programs, ending a high-profile effort to offer scalable, credit-granting online courses at residential colleges.

      The consortium, known as Semester Online, was initially marketed as a platform for top-tier universities to offer online courses to paying students at participating universities. During the 2012 media storm surrounding massive open online courses, it emerged with a distinctive message, promising small course sizes and live, interactive videoconferencing sessions.

      But before the launch of last fall’s pilot, Duke and Vanderbilt Universities and the University of Rochester had backed out, and Wake Forest University remained on the fence. At the colleges that dropped out and at Wake Forest, the decisions came after intense faculty debate; Duke, for example, rejected joining the consortium in a 16-14 vote by the Arts & Sciences Council. Although Wake Forest eventually joined the consortium, which this spring expanded with new courses and international partners, the universities and 2U reached a mutual decision to end the initiative.

      “Semester Online was always an experiment,” Chance Patterson, 2U’s senior vice president of communications, said in an email. “The pilot program experienced significant challenges related to the complexities of a consortium structure.”

      In addition to losing some of its founding members, Semester Online’s fall pilot also struggled with low enrollment. Some participating universities were unable to sign up students until mid-June -- several months after fall registration -- meaning some courses were left with single-digit enrollments.

      Patterson described Semester Online as an “informative” experience that has “helped 2U develop its instructional model for the undergraduate population.” And along with Wednesday’s announcement that it would disband the consortium, 2U also unveiled its first undergraduate degree program, an RN to BSN program developed in partnership with Simmons College.

      In an email, Claire E. Sterk, provost of Emory University, described her institution's participation in Semester Online as a learning experience, and thanked the faculty "for being open to academic innovation."

      "From my perspective, it was a great experiment led by our dean of arts and sciences and the faculty," Sterk wrote. "We also learned important lessons about the ways in which universities teach and are able to compare traditional versus more innovative modes of teaching."

      Ed Macias, provost emeritus at Washington University in St. Louis, said via email that he was "proud to have been part of this experiment in online education," and that courses had been "top quality."

      2U, fresh off a successful initial public offering last week, is better-known for developing fully online master’s degree programs for institutions such as Georgetown University, the University of California at Berkeley and the University of North Carolina, among others. 

      Those programs have generally been well-received among graduate school faculty. Writing about his experiences with the University of North Carolina's online M.B.A. program, Scott Cohen, a professor with more than three decades of teaching in graduate-level business courses, described the online experience as "more intimate than 90 percent of the seminars I’ve taught in or taken."

      Jensen Comment
      Some universities claim that they do not accept distance education transfer credit. However, in some instances it's impossible on a transcript to know whether a student took one or more courses from a highly regarded university online or onsite. Universities like the University of Wisconsin and Indiana University have multiple sections of courses where some sections can be taken on campus and other sections can be taken online. The transcripts may not differentiate between those sections when students from those universities are seeking to transfer to other universities.

      From US News in 2014
      Best Online Degree Programs (ranked)
      ---
      http://www.usnews.com/education/online-education

      Best Online Undergraduate Bachelors Degrees --- http://www.usnews.com/education/online-education/bachelors/rankings
      Central Michigan is the big winner

      Best Online Graduate Business MBA Programs --- http://www.usnews.com/education/online-education/mba/rankings
      Indiana University is the big winner

      Best Online Graduate Education Programs --- http://www.usnews.com/education/online-education/education/rankings
      Northern Illinois is the big winner

      Best Online Graduate Engineering Programs --- http://www.usnews.com/education/online-education/engineering/rankings
      Columbia University is the big winner

      Best Online Graduate Information Technology Programs ---
      http://www.usnews.com/education/online-education/computer-information-technology/rankings
      The University of Southern California is the big winner

      Best Online Graduate Nursing Programs --- http://www.usnews.com/education/online-education/nursing/rankings
      St. Xavier University is the big winner

      US News Degree Finder --- http://www.usnews.com/education/online-education/features/multistep-oe?s_cid=54089
      This beats those self-serving for-profit university biased Degree Finders

      US News has tried for years to rank for-profit universities, but they don't seem to want to provide the data.

      Bob Jensen's threads on online training and education courses and degree programs ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/CrossBorder.htm

       

    • Robert E Jensen

      Educating the Net Generation
      Diana G. Oblinger and James L. Oblinger, Editors
      Educause,
      ISBN 0-9672853-2-1 (free online)
      2005
      http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/pub7101f.pdf

      Educating the Net Generation Diana G. Oblinger and James L. Oblinger, Editors

      Chapter 1: Introduction by Diana Oblinger, EDUCAUSE, and James Oblinger, North Carolina State University

      Chapter 2: Is It Age or IT: First Steps Toward Understanding the Net Generation by Diana Oblinger, EDUCAUSE, and James Oblinger, North Carolina State University

      Chapter 3: Technology and Learning Expectations of the Net Generation by Greg Roberts, University of Pittsburgh–Johnstown

      Chapter 4: Using Technology as a Learning Tool, Not Just the Cool New Thing by Ben McNeely, North Carolina State University

      Chapter 5: The Student’s Perspective by Carie Windham, North Carolina State University

      Chapter 6: Preparing the Academy of Today for the Learner of Tomorrow by Joel Hartman, Patsy Moskal, and Chuck Dziuban, University of Central Florida

      • Introduction • Generations and Technology
      • Emerging Pattern s
      • Assessing the Generations in Online Learning
      • Learning Engagement, Interaction Value, and Enhanced Learning in the Generation s
      • Responding to Result s
      • Excellent Teaching
      • Conclusion • Endnote s
      • Further Reading
      • About the Authors

      Chapter 7: Convenience, Communications, and Control: How Students Use Technology by Robert Kvavik, ECAR and University of Minnesota


      The (Department of Education Report in March 2014) report says that American colleges now offer 17,374 online programs altogether, 29 percent of which are master’s-degree programs, with bachelor’s and certificate programs making up 23 percent each. Business and management programs are the most popular, at 29 percent of the total, followed by health and medicine programs (16 percent), education programs (14 percent), and information technology and computers (10 percent) ---
      http://chronicle.com/blogs/wiredcampus/quickwire-there-may-be-fewer-online-programs-than-you-think/51163?cid=at&utm_source=at&utm_medium=en

      From US News in 2014
      Best Online Degree Programs (ranked)
      ---
      http://www.usnews.com/education/online-education

      Best Online Undergraduate Bachelors Degrees --- http://www.usnews.com/education/online-education/bachelors/rankings
      Central Michigan is the big winner

      Best Online Graduate Business MBA Programs --- http://www.usnews.com/education/online-education/mba/rankings
      Indiana University is the big winner

      Best Online Graduate Education Programs --- http://www.usnews.com/education/online-education/education/rankings
      Northern Illinois is the big winner

      Best Online Graduate Engineering Programs --- http://www.usnews.com/education/online-education/engineering/rankings
      Columbia University is the big winner

      Best Online Graduate Information Technology Programs ---
      http://www.usnews.com/education/online-education/computer-information-technology/rankings
      The University of Southern California is the big winner

      Best Online Graduate Nursing Programs --- http://www.usnews.com/education/online-education/nursing/rankings
      St. Xavier University is the big winner

      US News Degree Finder --- http://www.usnews.com/education/online-education/features/multistep-oe?s_cid=54089
      This beats those self-serving for-profit university biased Degree Finders

      US News has tried for years to rank for-profit universities, but they don't seem to want to provide the data.


      Find your online degree with the SUNY Learning Network --- http://sln.suny.edu/

      Online SUNY Graduate Programs

      Online Master Degree Programs

      MBA | MS | MA | MLS | M.Ed. * denotes SLN Affiliated campus

      Online Master of Business Degree Programs

      Online Master of Science Degree Programs

      Online Master of Arts Degree Programs

      Online Master of Library Science

      Online Master of Education

      Online Doctoral Degree Programs

      DNP * DENOTES SLN AFFILIATED CAMPUS

      Online Doctor of Nursing Practice

      The SUNY Learning Network program is administered by the Office of the Provost.

       

      "Open SUNY Unites Online Ed Offerings Across 64 Institutions," by Dian Schaffhauser, Campus Technology, January 21, 2014 ---
      http://campustechnology.com/articles/2014/01/21/open-suny-unites-online-ed-offerings-across-64-institutions.aspx?=CT21

      The State University of New York (SUNY) has formally introduced a new online program that allows students to access courses, degrees, professors and academic resources from any of SUNY's 64 campuses. Open SUNY, as it's called, is a mix-and-match service that offers access to 400 "online-enabled" degrees, 12,000 course sections and eight full degrees. The system's expectation is that people from inside and outside the state will attend courses, including international students.

      Students can use the program to start a degree, finish a degree or just take a single course. The Open SUNY Navigator allows a potential student to specify what type of program he or she wants in categories such as entirely online or hybrid, synchronous or asynchronous, experiential, accelerated and so on — and the navigation tool provides potential online offerings to fit the criteria.

      "Open SUNY will provide our students with the nation's leading online learning experience, drawing on the power of SUNY to expand access, improve completion, and prepare more students for success," said Chancellor Nancy Zimpher. "In addition to these new, fully-online degree programs, Open SUNY will take every online course we offer at every SUNY campus...and make them easy to find and accessible for every SUNY student and prospective learners around the globe."

      Along with providing a central application through which to locate course offerings, SUNY is offering Open SUNY+, which adds additional layers of support for online students and instructors. Specific additions include a 24/7 help desk for technical support, a "concierge" service to act as a single source for getting all program questions answered, and extended hour tutoring services. Faculty will have access to training programs and online forums where they can broaden their knowledge about developing effective online courses or share best practices.

      Eight Open SUNY+ degree programs debuting this month were chosen based on a number of factors, including student interest, accreditation, and their capacity to meet current and future workforce demand throughout New York State.

      Among the institutions involved are:

      "We are proud of our collaboration and success in serving a qualified student population that may not otherwise be able to pursue a degree in electrical engineering," said Stony Brook President Samuel Stanley Jr. "We are joining forces with our colleagues at Binghamton University and the University at Buffalo to make a difference. We look forward to implementation of Open SUNY. This is truly an exciting time to be involved in higher education in New York State."


      The top flagship state universities in the USA are under increasing pressures from their legislators to offer more an more business degrees online, including undergraduate business degrees, masters of accounting degrees, and MBA degrees. The question is whether the most prestigious private universities like Stanford and Harvard will join in the competition.

      The Top MBA Programs in the World according to the Financial Times ---
      http://rankings.ft.com/businessschoolrankings/global-mba-ranking-2014

      The Top MBA Programs in the USA according to US News
      http://grad-schools.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/best-graduate-schools/top-business-schools

      "Half of U.S. Business Schools Might Be Gone by 2020," by Patrick Clark, Bloomberg Businessweek, March 14, 2014 ---
      http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2014-03-14/online-programs-could-erase-half-of-u-dot-s-dot-business-schools-by-2020

      Richard Lyons, the dean of University of California, Berkeley’s Haas School of Business, has a dire forecast for business education: “Half of the business schools in this country could be out of business in 10 years—or five,” he says.

      The threat, says Lyons, is that more top MBA programs will start to offer degrees online. That will imperil the industry’s business model. For most business schools, students pursuing part-time and executive MBAs generate crucial revenue. Those programs, geared toward working professionals, will soon have to compete with elite online alternatives for the same population.

      . . .

      Online MBA programs aren’t siphoning choice students from campuses yet, says Ash Soni, executive associate dean at Indiana University’s Kelley School of Business. Kelley ranks 15th on Bloomberg Businessweek’s list of full-time programs and was an early player in online MBAs. The school draws students from across the country, but it is more likely to compete with online MBA programs offered by the University of North Carolina’s Kenan-Flagler Business School and Arizona State’s Carey School of Business. Says Soni: “If you’re a dean from a regional school and you’re asking, ‘Are these online guys tapping into my space?’ The answer is: maybe in the future, but not yet.”

      Michael Desiderio, the executive director of the Executive MBA Council, says change is coming, but his group isn’t panicking. “We’re not saying it’s a threat or this is the end of the EMBA space,” he says. “It’s stimulating a discussion: How do we adapt to continue to serve a population that has changing needs?”

      Online education is sure to shift the ways schools compete for students. For-profit MBA programs such as DeVry’s Keller School of Management have been the early losers as more traditional universities go online, says Robert Lytle, a partner in the education practice at consultancy Parthenon Group. That trend could extend to lower-ranked schools as the big-name brands follow.

      When Lytle talks to directors at schools who are debating the merits of online learning, he tells them to stop dallying and start building programs. “Once you get out of the top tier of schools, you’re either already online, on your way there, or dead in the water,” he says. It isn’t clear which online models will be most successful, but many schools are feeling pressure to get on board. When Villanova School of Business announced a new online MBA program earlier this year, Dean Patrick Maggitti said there has never been a more uncertain time in higher education. “I think it’s smart strategy to be looking at options in this market.”

       

      Jensen Comment --- Where I Disagree
      Firstly, this is not so much a threat to undergraduate business schools, because most of the prestigious and highly ranked universities with MBA programs do not even offer undergraduate business degrees. It's not likely that Harvard and Stanford and the London Business School will commence to offer undergraduate business degrees online.

      Secondly, this is not so much a threat to masters of accounting programs, because most of the prestigious and highly ranked universities with MBA programs do not even offer masters of accounting degrees and do not have enough accounting courses to meet the minimal requirements to take the CPA examination in most states. . It's not likely that Harvard and Stanford and the London Business School will commence to offer masters of accounting degrees online.

      Thirdly, this is not so much of a threat even at the MBA level to universities who admit graduate students with lower admissions credentials. The US News Top MBA programs currently pick off the cream of the crop in terms of GMAT and gpa credentials. The top flagship state universities like the the Haas School at UC Berkeley, the University of Michigan, and the University of Illinois pick off the top students who cannot afford prestigious private universities. By the time all these universities skim the cream of the crop the second-tier public and private universities struggle with more marginal students applying for MBA programs.

      It would be both dangerous and sad if the very top MBA programs introduced lower admissions standards for online programs vis-a-vis on-campus programs. In order to maintain the highest standards the most prestigious universities will have to cater to the highest quality foreign students and herein lies a huge problem. Some nations like China are notorious for fraud and cheating on admissions credentials like the GMAT. In Russia such credentials are for sale to the highest bidders.

      The name of the game in business education is placement of graduates. Prestigious university MBA programs are at the top of the heap in terms of placement largely because of their successful alumni and strong alumni networks that actively seek MBA graduates from their alma maters. This will not work as well for online programs, especially since many of the online graduates of prestigious university online programs will live outside the USA.

      However, top flagship state universities are under increasing pressures from their legislators to offer more an more business degrees online, including undergraduate business degrees, masters of accounting degrees, and MBA degrees. This is already happening as is reflected in the following rankings of online programs by US News:

      From US News in 2014
      Best Online Degree Programs (ranked)
      ---
      http://www.usnews.com/education/online-education

      Best Online Undergraduate Bachelors Degrees --- http://www.usnews.com/education/online-education/bachelors/rankings
      Central Michigan is the big winner

      Best Online Graduate Business MBA Programs --- http://www.usnews.com/education/online-education/mba/rankings
      Indiana University is the big winner

      Best Online Graduate Education Programs --- http://www.usnews.com/education/online-education/education/rankings
      Northern Illinois is the big winner

      Best Online Graduate Engineering Programs --- http://www.usnews.com/education/online-education/engineering/rankings
      Columbia University is the big winner

      Best Online Graduate Information Technology Programs ---
      http://www.usnews.com/education/online-education/computer-information-technology/rankings
      The University of Southern California is the big winner

      Best Online Graduate Nursing Programs --- http://www.usnews.com/education/online-education/nursing/rankings
      St. Xavier University is the big winner

      US News Degree Finder --- http://www.usnews.com/education/online-education/features/multistep-oe?s_cid=54089
      This beats those self-serving for-profit university biased Degree Finders

      US News has tried for years to rank for-profit universities, but they don't seem to want to provide the data.

       

      I don't anticipate that the highest-prestige MBA programs will have online degree programs anytime soon. They may have more and more free MOOCs, but that is an entirely different ballgame if no credit is given for the MOOCs. The highly prestigious Wharton is now offering its first-year MBA courses as free MOOCs ---
      http://www.topmba.com/blog/wharton-steps-experimentation-moocs-mba-news
      Also see http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2013-09-13/wharton-puts-first-year-mba-courses-online-for-free

      Who are these students taking free first-year MOOC courses from Wharton?
      Some are college professors who adding what they learn in MOOCs to the courses they themselves teach. Most MOOCs, by the way, are advanced courses on highly specialized topics like the literature of both famous and obscure writers. Others are basic courses that contribute to career advancement.
       

      • For example, the business school at Penn, Wharton, now offers its core MBA courses as free MOOCs. Some students who intently take these courses are seeking to get into Wharton and other prestigious MBA programs.
         
      • Sometimes the purposes of taking free Wharton MOOCs are to raise GMAT scores to get into prestigious MBA programs and to do better in those programs once admitted so that they too can tap those six-figure starting salaries of graduates from prestigious MBA Programs.
         
      • Sometimes the purposes of taking free Wharton MOOCs are to raise GMAT scores to obtain better financial aid packages for further graduate study.
         
      • Sometimes the purposes of taking free Wharton MOOCs are to perform better on the job and thereby get better performance evaluations and raises.

      Bob Jensen's threads on online training and education programs ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/CrossBorder.htm

       

    • Robert E Jensen

      "U Southern California Ed School Intros Online Teacher Training," by Dian Schaffhauser, T.H.E. Journal, May 9, 2014 ---
      http://thejournal.com/articles/2014/05/09/usc-ed-school-packages-teacher-training.aspx

      he University of Southern California's (USC) Rossier School Education has developed a set of online and blended training courses to help teachers develop their skills in working with diverse learners. The school will make the online certificate program available through Knowledge Delivery Systems (KDS), a company that provides professional learning to states and school districts. The new courses will launch in fall 2014.

      The courses have been developed by faculty members at Rossier whose areas of expertise include English learners, gifted learners and underserved students. The first four courses focus on relationally responsive classroom management, responding to individual differences, facilitating learning for non-standard English learners and pedagogical practices for English learners.

      Those will be delivered on KDS' online platform. Following the format of other KDS instruction, the program will include coaching, modeling, practice and feedback. The two partners will contract with districts to deliver teacher training in the Rossier-designed program.

      Those who finish all four courses will earn a certificate of competency from the university.

      "This program is a revolutionary joint effort to deliver an innovative, effective transformation in teaching practice, at scale, leveraging technology," said KDS CEO Alvin Crawford.

      Added Rossier Dean Karen Symms Gallagher, "The mission of the Rossier School is to improve learning in urban education locally, nationally and globally. This partnership will be yet another example of expanding our reach to meet that mission."


      Read more at http://thejournal.com/articles/2014/05/09/usc-ed-school-packages-teacher-training.aspx#8lw3mgfdtW7aseD1.99
      he University of Southern California's (USC) Rossier School Education has developed a set of online and blended training courses to help teachers develop their skills in working with diverse learners. The school will make the online certificate program available through Knowledge Delivery Systems (KDS), a company that provides professional learning to states and school districts. The new courses will launch in fall 2014.

      The courses have been developed by faculty members at Rossier whose areas of expertise include English learners, gifted learners and underserved students. The first four courses focus on relationally responsive classroom management, responding to individual differences, facilitating learning for non-standard English learners and pedagogical practices for English learners.

      Those will be delivered on KDS' online platform. Following the format of other KDS instruction, the program will include coaching, modeling, practice and feedback. The two partners will contract with districts to deliver teacher training in the Rossier-designed program.

      Those who finish all four courses will earn a certificate of competency from the university.

      "This program is a revolutionary joint effort to deliver an innovative, effective transformation in teaching practice, at scale, leveraging technology," said KDS CEO Alvin Crawford.

      Added Rossier Dean Karen Symms Gallagher, "The mission of the Rossier School is to improve learning in urban education locally, nationally and globally. This partnership will be yet another example of expanding our reach to meet that mission."


      Read more at http://thejournal.com/articles/2014/05/09/usc-ed-school-packages-teacher-training.aspx#8lw3mgfdtW7aseD1.99
      he University of Southern California's (USC) Rossier School Education has developed a set of online and blended training courses to help teachers develop their skills in working with diverse learners. The school will make the online certificate program available through Knowledge Delivery Systems (KDS), a company that provides professional learning to states and school districts. The new courses will launch in fall 2014.

      The courses have been developed by faculty members at Rossier whose areas of expertise include English learners, gifted learners and underserved students. The first four courses focus on relationally responsive classroom management, responding to individual differences, facilitating learning for non-standard English learners and pedagogical practices for English learners.

      Those will be delivered on KDS' online platform. Following the format of other KDS instruction, the program will include coaching, modeling, practice and feedback. The two partners will contract with districts to deliver teacher training in the Rossier-designed program.

      Those who finish all four courses will earn a certificate of competency from the university.

      "This program is a revolutionary joint effort to deliver an innovative, effective transformation in teaching practice, at scale, leveraging technology," said KDS CEO Alvin Crawford.

      Added Rossier Dean Karen Symms Gallagher, "The mission of the Rossier School is to improve learning in urban education locally, nationally and globally. This partnership will be yet another example of expanding our reach to meet that mission."


      Read more at http://thejournal.com/articles/2014/05/09/usc-ed-school-packages-teacher-training.aspx#8lw3mgfdtW7aseD1.99

      The University of Southern California's (USC) Rossier School Education has developed a set of online and blended training courses to help teachers develop their skills in working with diverse learners. The school will make the online certificate program available through Knowledge Delivery Systems (KDS), a company that provides professional learning to states and school districts. The new courses will launch in fall 2014.

      The courses have been developed by faculty members at Rossier whose areas of expertise include English learners, gifted learners and underserved students. The first four courses focus on relationally responsive classroom management, responding to individual differences, facilitating learning for non-standard English learners and pedagogical practices for English learners.

      Those will be delivered on KDS' online platform. Following the format of other KDS instruction, the program will include coaching, modeling, practice and feedback. The two partners will contract with districts to deliver teacher training in the Rossier-designed program.

      Those who finish all four courses will earn a certificate of competency from the university.

      "This program is a revolutionary joint effort to deliver an innovative, effective transformation in teaching practice, at scale, leveraging technology," said KDS CEO Alvin Crawford.

      Added Rossier Dean Karen Symms Gallagher, "The mission of the Rossier School is to improve learning in urban education locally, nationally and globally. This partnership will be yet another example of expanding our reach to meet that mission."

      Bob Jensen's threads on distance education and training alternatives ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/CrossBorder.htm

    • Robert E Jensen

      Also note how popular technology is becoming in the onsite K-12 classrooms
      "Report: 83 Percent of High Schools Offer Online Courses," by Joshua Bolkan, T.H.E. Journal, June 6, 2014 ---
      http://thejournal.com/articles/2014/06/11/report-83-percent-of-high-schools-offer-online-courses.aspx

      Only 17 percent of high schools do not currently offer any online classes and more than 40 percent are offering online courses in English language arts, history, math or science, according to the latest report from Project Tomorrow's Speak Up report.

      Based on online survey responses from more than 400,000 teachers, administrators, students and community members, the latest report, "The New Digital Learning Playbook: Advancing College and Career Skill Development in K-12 Schools," examines attitudes about technology's role in preparing K-12 students for higher education and careers.

      The reasons principals who participated in the survey cited for offering online classes include offering remediation, at a rate of 66 percent, Keeping students engaged, at 63 percent and to provide credit recovery options, at 61 percent.

      "Teachers who teach online classes, in particular, see a strong correlation between the use of technology and students' college and career ready skill development," according to information released by Project Tomorrow. "More than half of these teachers say technology use helps students understand how to apply academic concepts to real world problems (58 percent), take ownership of their learning (57 percent) and develop problem solving and critical thinking skills (57 percent)."

      Other key findings regarding online learning and digital resources include:

      • 32 percent of elementary school teachers surveyed told researchers they use games in their classrooms. The most common reason cited was increasing engagement, at 79 percent, followed by the ability to address different learning styles at 72 percent;
      • Science teachers are more likely than other teachers to report using digital content in the classroom, with 63 percent reporting that they use videos they find online versus only 48 percent of other teachers. Science teachers also reported using animations at a clip of 52 percent and only 22 percent of other teachers said the same. The difference held across other types of digital content as well, including virtual labs, real time data, online textbooks and teacher-created videos;
      • Teachers with online classes were more likely than those in 1:1 environments and those using digital content to report that technology helps students develop creativity, take ownership of their learning, develop critical thinking or problem solving skills or understand how concepts relate to the real world;
      • Online teachers were less likely than teachers in 1:1 environments and teachers who use digital content to tell researchers technology can increase motiviation to learn or help students learn to work collaboratively;
      • While 41 percent of teachers surveyed reported that they had taken at least one online course for professional development, only 17 percent told researchers they were interested in teaching an online class;
      • More than half, 54 percent, of administrators who participated in the survey told researchers they believed " that the effective use of digital content within the classroom can increase students' career readiness by linking real world problems to academic content. Administrators surveyed also said that providing enough computers and bandwidth to realize those benefits was a challenge, at rates of 55 and 38 percent, respectively; and
      • Technology administrators who took part in the survey said that sufficient bandwidth would increase the use of streaming content in classes (74 percent), increase the use of multimedia tools (68 percent) and the use of online curricula (57 percent).

      Read more at http://thejournal.com/articles/2014/06/11/report-83-percent-of-high-schools-offer-online-courses.aspx#ly5DUUCPUp93XCxL.99

      Department of Education in March 2014:  17,374 online higher education distance education and training programs altogether

      Jensen Comment
      Note that the hundreds of free MOOC courses from prestigious universities are not the same as fee-based distance education degree and certificate programs that are more like on-campus programs in terms in student-instructor interactions, graded assignments, and examinations. Some campuses like the University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee even treat online programs as cash cows where the tuition is higher for online programs than identical on-campus programs.

      The (Department of Education Report in March 2014) report says that American colleges now offer 17,374 online programs altogether, 29 percent of which are master’s-degree programs, with bachelor’s and certificate programs making up 23 percent each. Business and management programs are the most popular, at 29 percent of the total, followed by health and medicine programs (16 percent), education programs (14 percent), and information technology and computers (10 percent) ---
      http://chronicle.com/blogs/wiredcampus/quickwire-there-may-be-fewer-online-programs-than-you-think/51163?cid=at&utm_source=at&utm_medium=en

      From US News in 2014
      Best Online Degree Programs (ranked)
      ---
      http://www.usnews.com/education/online-education

      Best Online Undergraduate Bachelors Degrees --- http://www.usnews.com/education/online-education/bachelors/rankings
      Central Michigan is the big winner

      Best Online Graduate Business MBA Programs --- http://www.usnews.com/education/online-education/mba/rankings
      Indiana University is the big winner

      Best Online Graduate Education Programs --- http://www.usnews.com/education/online-education/education/rankings
      Northern Illinois is the big winner

      Best Online Graduate Engineering Programs --- http://www.usnews.com/education/online-education/engineering/rankings
      Columbia University is the big winner

      Best Online Graduate Information Technology Programs ---
      http://www.usnews.com/education/online-education/computer-information-technology/rankings
      The University of Southern California is the big winner

      Best Online Graduate Nursing Programs --- http://www.usnews.com/education/online-education/nursing/rankings
      St. Xavier University is the big winner

      US News Degree Finder --- http://www.usnews.com/education/online-education/features/multistep-oe?s_cid=54089
      This beats those self-serving for-profit university biased Degree Finders

      US News has tried for years to rank for-profit universities, but they don't seem to want to provide the dat

       

      Bob Jensen's threads on distance education and training alternatives ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/CrossBorder.htm

    • Robert E Jensen

      "Starbucks Plan Shines a Light on the Profits in Online Education Starbucks Plan Shines a Light on the Profits in Online Education:  That Arizona State U. can afford to offer such big discounts to employees of the coffee company suggests just how much higher-education institutions earn from distance learning," by Goldie Blumenstyk, Chronicle of Higher Education, June 27, 2014 ---
      http://chronicle.com/article/Starbucks-Plan-Shines-a-Light/147395/?cid=wc&utm_source=wc&utm_medium=en

      Jensen Comment
      Without mentioning it, Goldie has hit on what we teach in managerial accounting as "Cost-Profit-Volume (CPV)" analysis. The contribution margin is price minus variable costs. Such margins apply first to recovering fixed costs and then go to operating profits. Higher volume (sales) means that it's possible to make lower contribution margins profitable by lowering prices ceteris paribus.

      Key to CPV analysis is management of variable and fixed costs. The Starbucks plan is ingeniously designed to reduce costs. Firstly it applies only to the continuance of the last two years of college education. This avoids much of the cost associated with students in their first two years. Firstly, it avoids the need for so much remedial work since students that pass the first two years are less likely to need added remedial education. Secondly, such students are less likely to waste resources by dropping out. Thirdly, most of them will have had previous distance education such that they do not have to be initially trained on how to take distance education courses.

      Actually many universities are finding distance education courses more profitable than onsite courses. One reason is the demand function. Onsite courses often are quite sensitive to tuition pricing because students have to consider other costs such as commuting costs, child care costs, and maybe even boarding costs. Online students often avoid such costs and therefore are somewhat less sensitive to slightly higher online pricing. 

      There are many other things that case writers could build into the "Starbucks Case." These include such factors as operating leverage, sales mix analysis, and demand elasticity analysis. Also increasing employee benefits sometimes means that employees will work for lower cash wages.

      In any case, I think it would make sense for managerial accounting teachers to assign student teams to write up cases and solutions to the "Starbucks Case" and other real-world instances of distance education.

       


      Teaching Case on CPV Analysis

      From The Wall Street Journal Accounting Weekly Review on January 6, 2012

      Starbucks to Raise Prices
      by: Annie Gasparro
      Jan 04, 2012
      Click here to view the full article on WSJ.com
      Click here to view the video on WSJ.com 
       

      TOPICS: Commitments, Cost Accounting, Cost Management, Managerial Accounting, Product strategy

      SUMMARY: Starbucks Corp. "said Tuesday it is raising prices an average of about 1% in the Northeast and Sunbelt regions...." Price increases will be posted for some but not all sizes of its brewed coffee products; the company "...isn't raising prices for packaged coffee sold at its cafes or at grocery stores." The article comments on pricing strategy, cost control, and profit margins. The related video discusses the company's purchase of a long term contract for coffee at high prices just before coffee prices fell overall.

      CLASSROOM APPLICATION: The article is useful to introduce manufacturing cost components and cost behavior with a simple product with which most students should be familiar.

      QUESTIONS: 
      1. (Introductory) Why is Starbucks raising the price of some of its locations for some of its products?

      2. (Introductory) On which products will Starbucks raise prices? In which locations? Why will the company's pricing vary by product and region?

      3. (Advanced) According to one statement in the article about Starbucks products, "...coffee represents a bigger portion of the cost of its packaged goods than of brewed coffee." What are the other cost components for a cup of brewed coffee that are not present in a package of whole coffee beans for sale in a grocery store?

      4. (Advanced) What was the impact of a contract for coffee purchases on Starbucks's costs for its product?

      5. (Advanced) Based on the discussion in the related online video, how does Starbucks expect coffee purchase costs to even out over the long term?
       

      Reviewed By: Judy Beckman, University of Rhode Island

      "Starbucks to Raise Prices," by: Annie Gasparro, The Wall Street Journal, January 4, 2012 ---
      http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970203550304577138922045363052.html?mod=djem_jiewr_AC_domainid

      Starbucks Corp. is raising brewed-coffee prices in some regions to offset its higher costs.

      The Seattle chain said Tuesday it is raising prices an average of about 1% in the Northeast and Sunbelt regions, including such cities as Boston, New York, Washington, Atlanta, Dallas and Albuquerque, N.M.

      Starbucks didn't give details on all the areas where prices will increase but said most southern states are included. Prices won't rise in California and Florida.

      Starbucks has raised prices in its cafes annually since the recession began, though the company said its increases have been "far less" than those of its rivals.

      Starbucks will face higher commodity costs than some of its competitors in the coming months. The chain made contracts to buy coffee for the fiscal year that began in October because prices were rising and Starbucks wanted to eliminate the volatility of buying on the spot market. But the market for coffee soon fell, and Starbucks was stuck paying more than it would have otherwise.

      Over the past couple of years, Starbucks has topped the industry in sales and been able to manage commodity inflation, "not with pricing, but with a more efficient cost structure and strong traffic growth," Chief Financial Officer Troy Alstead said in November when the company reported earnings.

      Because the chain's high-end consumer base is less sensitive to prices than that of some rivals, Starbucks has said it didn't think increases would affect customer purchases, even in a struggling economy. Some chains, especially fast-food restaurants that focus on low prices, risk losing customers when prices rise.

      Starbucks shares rose 43% last year. The stock fell 73 cents, or 1.6%, to $45.29 in 4 p.m. composite trading Tuesday on the Nasdaq Stock Market.

      The latest change, which was reported earlier by Reuters news service, raises the cost of a "tall," or 12-ounce, coffee in some New York City stores by 10 cents to $1.85. Not all sizes will see price increases.

      Starbucks isn't raising prices for packaged coffee sold at its cafes or at grocery stores. That's where Starbucks faces the greater pressure on profit margins, largely because coffee represents a bigger portion of the cost of its packaged goods than of brewed coffee.

      Continued in article

      Bob Jensen's threads on managerial accounting are at
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/Theory02.htm#ManagementAccounting

    • Robert E Jensen

      The International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning --- http://www.irrodl.org/index.php/irrodl/index

      Bob Jensen's threads on Open (free) learning materials, MOOCs, and tutorials from prestigious universities ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/000aaa/updateee.htm#OKI

      Bob Jensen's treads on fee-based distance education alternatives around the world ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/CrossBorder.htm

    • Robert E Jensen

      From the American Library Association
      Advocacy: Online Learning --- http://www.ala.org/onlinelearning/issues/advocacy

      The President of Northwestern University Predicts Online Learning … in 1934! ---
      http://www.openculture.com/2014/01/the-president-of-northwestern-university-predicts-online-learning-in-1934.html

      Only the medium was radio in those days --- the barrier then and now was inspiring people to want to sweat and endure pain to learn
      Bob Jensen's threads for online education and training alternatives ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/CrossBorder.htm 

      Also see the following links from Bob Jensen

      Growth Worldwide --- http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/HigherEdControversies.htm#DistanceEducation

      Alternatives Worldwide --- http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/CrossBorder.htm

      Free online tutorials, videos, and courses from prestigious universities ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/000aaa/updateee.htm#OKI

    • Robert E Jensen

      "Stanford (Graduate School of Business) Bets Big on Virtual (online) Education," by Natalie Kitroeff and Akane Otani, Bloomberg Businessweek, November 6, 2014 ---
      http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2014-11-05/stanford-gsb-offers-executive-certificate-program-completely-online 

      Stanford’s Graduate School of Business took its relationship with online education to the next level on Wednesday, when it announced that a new program for company executives will be delivered entirely by way of the Internet.

      “I don’t know of anything else like this,” says Audrey Witters, managing director of online executive education at Stanford GSB. “We’ve put together something for a very targeted audience, people who are trying to be corporate innovators, with courses where they all work together. That’s a lot different from taking a MOOC [massive open online course].”

      Stanford said it will admit up to 100 people to the LEAD Certificate program, which will begin in May 2015 and deliver the “intimate and academically rigorous on-campus Stanford experience” to students from the comfort of their computer screens. In an effort to make students “really feel connected to each other, to Stanford, and to the faculty,” the eight-course program will encourage students to interact through message boards, online chats, Google Hangouts, and phone calls over the course of its yearlong duration, Witters says.

      “We really want to create the high-engagement, community aspect that everyone who comes to Stanford’s campus feels,” she says.

      The classes will be offered on a platform supplied by Novoed, a virtual education company started by former Stanford professor Amin Saberi and Stanford Ph.D. student Farnaz Ronaghi. The B-school has invested a significant chunk of its resources in launching the program: About 10 to 15 faculty members are slated to teach the courses. In addition to building a studio where it will film course videos, the school has hired a growing pool of educational technology experts and motion graphic designers to work on the courses, according to Witters.

      “This is by far the most serious and most significant initiative by GSB in the online realm,” Saberi says.

      People go to business school for more than just lectures, Saberi says, and online programs should be as good at teaching the numbers of business as the art of it. “What we are planning to do is to create a very similar environment online where they can acquire softer skills and build a network of peers.”

      The program’s $16,000 price tag dwarfs the online offerings of Stanford’s competitors, including Harvard Business School’s $1,500 nine-week online program and the Wharton School’s entirely free first-year MBA classes, which it put on the virtual platform Coursera last fall.

      The program may seem less pricey, though, to the company executives it’s intended for. Business schools have traditionally sold certificates to working professionals for tens, if not hundreds, of thousands of dollars. Stanford’s own six-week, on-campus program costs executives $62,500.

      To Novoed, which also provides technology to Wharton, the Haas School of Business, and the Darden School of Business, the Internet is an obvious place for business schools to expand their lucrative executive education programs.

      Saberi says companies are interested in elite training programs that don’t require employees to leave their desks. “We expect that programs like this are going to grow.”

      "Disruption Ahead: What MOOCs Will Mean for MBA Programs," Knowledge@wharton Blog, July 16, 2014 ---
      http://knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu/article/moocs-mba-programs-opportunities-threats/

      In a new research paper, Christian Terwiesch, professor of operations and information management at Wharton, and Karl Ulrich, vice dean of innovation at the school, examine the impact that massive open online courses (MOOCs) will have on business schools and MBA programs. In their study — titled, “Will Video Kill the Classroom Star? The Threat and Opportunity of MOOCs for Full-time MBA Programs” — they identify three possible scenarios that business schools face not just as a result of MOOCs, but also because of the technology embedded in them. In an interview with Knowledge@Wharton, Terwiesch and Ulrich discuss their findings.

      An edited transcript of the interview appears below.

      Knowledge@Wharton: Christian, perhaps you could start us off by describing the main findings or takeaways from your research?

      Terwiesch: Let me preface what we’re going to discuss about business schools by saying that Karl and I have been in the business school world for many, many years. We love this institution, and we really want to make sure that we find a sustainable path forward for business schools.

      Continued in article

       

       

      "What Georgia Tech’s Online Degree in Computer Science Means for Low-Cost Programs," by Steve Kolowich, Chronicle of Higher Education, November 6, 2014 ---
      http://chronicle.com/article/What-Georgia-Tech-s-Online/149857/?cid=wc

      Among all recent inventions that have to do with MOOCs, the Georgia Institute of Technology’s online master’s program in computer science may have the best chance of changing how much students pay for a traditional degree.

      The program, which started last winter, pairs MOOC-like course videos and assessments with a support system of course assistants who work directly with students. The goal is to create a low-cost master’s degree that is nonetheless "just as rigorous" as the on-campus equivalent—producing graduates who are "just as good," to quote one of the new program’s cheerleaders, President Obama. The price: less than $7,000 for the three-year program, a small fraction of the cost of the traditional program.

      It’s too early yet for a graduating class. But researchers at Georgia Tech and Harvard University have studied the students who have enrolled in the program, in an effort to figure out "where the demand is coming from and what it’s substituting for educationally," says Joshua S. Goodman, an assistant professor of public policy at Harvard.

      By understanding what kinds of students are drawn to the new program, Mr. Goodman and his fellow researchers think they can begin to understand what competitors it might threaten.

      Here is what they found out about those students:

      How They Are Different

      The enrollees are numerous. The online program this year got as many applications as Georgia Tech’s traditional program did during two recent semesters. But while the traditional program accepted only about 15 percent of its applicants, the online program accepted 50 percent, enrolling about 1,800 in its first year. That might not qualify as large in light of the 50,000-students-per-course figures often quoted in reference to MOOCs, but it does make the online program three times as large as the largest traditional master’s programs in computer science, according to the researchers.

      They’re older (and they already have jobs). The people enrolling in the online program are 35 years old, on average, and are far more likely to report that they are working rather than studying full time. (The average age of the students in Georgia Tech’s traditional program is 24, with only half indicating that they are employed.) That should not surprise anyone who has even a passing familiarity with online education. Online programs have pitched themselves to adults who are tethered to work and family, and who want to earn degrees without rearranging their lives around a course schedule.

      They’re from the United States. Online education is supposed to make geographic borders matter less. But this online master’s program has drawn 80 percent of its students from within the country. By contrast, in the traditional program, 75 percent of the students are foreign, mostly from India and China.

      Most of them did not study computer science in college. In the traditional graduate program, 62 percent of students have completed an undergraduate major in computer science. That is true of only 40 percent of the online students. The percentage of undergraduate engineering majors, 27 percent, remained constant.

      How They Are Similar

      They’re good at school. Unlike San Jose State University’s MOOC-related pilot program, which tried and failed to help underperforming students, Georgia Tech’s online program appeals to students with a proven academic track record, specifically those who earned bachelor’s degrees with a grade-point average of 3.0 or higher. (The university told The Chronicle last year that its first group of applicants averaged a 3.58 GPA—about the same as the students in the traditional program.) They seem to be doing well so far: Courses held last spring and summer saw pass rates of about 88 percent, according to the university.

      They’re mostly men. The online program had a lower rate of female applicants than the traditional program did, but there were precious few in either pool: 14 percent and 25 percent, respectively. Among American applicants, the rates were similar: 13 percent and 16 percent.

      Over all, the first enrollees in Georgia Tech’s MOOC-like master’s program fit the profile of students who are applying to online graduate programs at institutions across the country.

      Continued in article

    • Robert E Jensen

      Open University in the United Kingdom --- http://www.open.ac.uk/

      Open Courses, Tutorials, Videos, and Course Materials from Prestigious Universities in the USA ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/000aaa/updateee.htm#OKI

      Fee-Based Distance Education Alternatives Around the World ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/CrossBorder.htm

    • Robert E Jensen

      Distance Education:  Stanford Center for Professional Development
      Stanford University was probably the first prestigious university to offer an online masters degree in engineering in a video program called ADEPT. That has since been replaced by an expanded online program in professional development that offers certificates or full masters of science degrees in selected programs, especially engineering. The program is highly restrictive in that students must work for employers Must be members of Stanford's Corporate Education Graduate Program. For example, to earn a masters of science degree the requirements are as follows:

      For details go to
      http://scpd.stanford.edu/home

      Most other top universities in the USA now have selected online certificate and degree programs offered in their extension programs. Go to a university of interest and search for "extension." It's still rare to find an online doctoral program at a top university. For-profit universities offer more online doctoral programs, but these tend not to be accepted very well for employment in the Academy. In fact it may be better to not mention such doctoral degrees when seeking employment in the Academy.

      "Stanford (Graduate School of Business) Bets Big on Virtual (online) Education," by Natalie Kitroeff and Akane Otani, Bloomberg Businessweek, November 6, 2014 ---
      http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2014-11-05/stanford-gsb-offers-executive-certificate-program-completely-online 

      Stanford’s Graduate School of Business took its relationship with online education to the next level on Wednesday, when it announced that a new program for company executives will be delivered entirely by way of the Internet.

      “I don’t know of anything else like this,” says Audrey Witters, managing director of online executive education at Stanford GSB. “We’ve put together something for a very targeted audience, people who are trying to be corporate innovators, with courses where they all work together. That’s a lot different from taking a MOOC [massive open online course].”

      Stanford said it will admit up to 100 people to the LEAD Certificate program, which will begin in May 2015 and deliver the “intimate and academically rigorous on-campus Stanford experience” to students from the comfort of their computer screens. In an effort to make students “really feel connected to each other, to Stanford, and to the faculty,” the eight-course program will encourage students to interact through message boards, online chats, Google Hangouts, and phone calls over the course of its yearlong duration, Witters says.

      “We really want to create the high-engagement, community aspect that everyone who comes to Stanford’s campus feels,” she says.

      The classes will be offered on a platform supplied by Novoed, a virtual education company started by former Stanford professor Amin Saberi and Stanford Ph.D. student Farnaz Ronaghi. The B-school has invested a significant chunk of its resources in launching the program: About 10 to 15 faculty members are slated to teach the courses. In addition to building a studio where it will film course videos, the school has hired a growing pool of educational technology experts and motion graphic designers to work on the courses, according to Witters.

      “This is by far the most serious and most significant initiative by GSB in the online realm,” Saberi says.

      People go to business school for more than just lectures, Saberi says, and online programs should be as good at teaching the numbers of business as the art of it. “What we are planning to do is to create a very similar environment online where they can acquire softer skills and build a network of peers.”

      The program’s $16,000 price tag dwarfs the online offerings of Stanford’s competitors, including Harvard Business Schools $1,500 nine-week online program and the Wharton School’s entirely free first-year MBA classes, which it put on the virtual platform Coursera last fall.

      The program may seem less pricey, though, to the company executives it’s intended for. Business schools have traditionally sold certificates to working professionals for tens, if not hundreds, of thousands of dollars. Stanford’s own six-week, on-campus program costs executives $62,500.

      To Novoed, which also provides technology to Wharton, the Haas School of Business, and the Darden School of Business, the Internet is an obvious place for business schools to expand their lucrative executive education programs.

      Saberi says companies are interested in elite training programs that don’t require employees to leave their desks. “We expect that programs like this are going to grow.”

      Bob Jensen's threads on fee-based education and training alternatives ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/CrossBorder.htm

    • Robert E Jensen

      "Yale Announces ‘Blended’ Online Master’s Degree," by Steve Kolowich, Chronicle of Higher Education, March 10, 2015 ---
      http://chronicle.com/blogs/wiredcampus/yale-announces-blended-online-masters-degree/56003?cid=wc&utm_source=wc&utm_medium=en

      Yale University is creating a master’s program that will hold many courses online, continuing the Ivy League institution’s foray into “blended” learning.

      The online program, to be offered by the Yale School of Medicine, would aim to replicate its residential program for training physicians’ assistants. Students would meet in virtual classrooms where they would discuss course material using videoconferencing technology. They would also have to complete field training — accounting for roughly half of the coursework — in person, at Yale-approved clinics near where they live.

      It is the second professional school at Yale to try the “blended” model for a graduate program, following the Yale School of Nursing, which opened a partially online doctoral degree in 2011.

      Yale has taken an active but measured interest in online education in the past decade. In 2007 it became one of the first elite institutions to post lecture videos online at no charge. In 2011 it began offering online summer courses to small groups of undergraduates for credit. In 2013 it joined with Coursera and started building MOOCs.

      But a degree program that includes fully online courses is a step toward a different vision of how Yale and other highly selective traditional universities are likely to incorporate online education. Free online courses might make headlines, but tuition-based professional degrees in high-demand fields such as health care are where online courses, and the companies that help build them, are gaining a foothold.

      Other top-tier universities have created online versions of their professional-degree programs, which is something Yale noticed when taking stock of its online presence in 2012. The Johns Hopkins University, for example, offers an online master’s program in public health that delivers about 80 percent of its coursework on the web.

      2U, the online “enabler” company that is helping Yale develop the new program, previously built nursing programs at Georgetown University and Simmons College, as well as programs in public health and health administration at George Washington University.

      Institutions typically sign contracts with companies like 2U when they want to create new online programs as fast as possible without spending a lot of cash upfront. That is an especially attractive option for universities that are trying to grab a larger chunk of the market for high-demand professional degrees in fields such as health, nursing, data science, and business. It is there that 2U and others have found their sweet spot. The companies provide the technology platform and marketing expertise, and take a large share of the tuition revenues.

      Yale would hire new instructors to teach courses in the program, which is still awaiting accreditation approval. The tuition and faculty-to-student ratio would be roughly equivalent to the residential program.

      James Van Rhee, director of the program, said he did not know if the online version would be more profitable, but he did expect it would expand the medical school’s reach — especially in rural areas. The institution hopes to increase enrollments from 40, the size of the current program, to around 300.

      “I don’t know if it will be cost-efficient for us,” said Robert J. Alpern, dean of the medical school, but “hopefully it will be cost-efficient for the students, because they’ll be able to do it from home.”

      Distance Education:  Stanford Center for Professional Development
      Stanford University was probably the first prestigious university to offer an online masters degree in engineering in a video program called ADEPT. That has since been replaced by an expanded online program in professional development that offers certificates or full masters of science degrees in selected programs, especially engineering. The program is highly restrictive in that students must work for employers Must be members of Stanford's Corporate Education Graduate Program. For example, to earn a masters of science degree the requirements are as follows:

      For details go to
      http://scpd.stanford.edu/home

      Most other top universities in the USA now have selected online certificate and degree programs offered in their extension programs. Go to a university of interest and search for "extension." It's still rare to find an online doctoral program at a top university. For-profit universities offer more online doctoral programs, but these tend not to be accepted very well for employment in the Academy. In fact it may be better to not mention such doctoral degrees when seeking employment in the Academy.

      "Stanford (Graduate School of Business) Bets Big on Virtual (online) Education," by Natalie Kitroeff and Akane Otani, Bloomberg Businessweek, November 6, 2014 ---
      http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2014-11-05/stanford-gsb-offers-executive-certificate-program-completely-online 

      Stanford’s Graduate School of Business took its relationship with online education to the next level on Wednesday, when it announced that a new program for company executives will be delivered entirely by way of the Internet.

      “I don’t know of anything else like this,” says Audrey Witters, managing director of online executive education at Stanford GSB. “We’ve put together something for a very targeted audience, people who are trying to be corporate innovators, with courses where they all work together. That’s a lot different from taking a MOOC [massive open online course].”

      Stanford said it will admit up to 100 people to the LEAD Certificate program, which will begin in May 2015 and deliver the “intimate and academically rigorous on-campus Stanford experience” to students from the comfort of their computer screens. In an effort to make students “really feel connected to each other, to Stanford, and to the faculty,” the eight-course program will encourage students to interact through message boards, online chats, Google Hangouts, and phone calls over the course of its yearlong duration, Witters says.

      “We really want to create the high-engagement, community aspect that everyone who comes to Stanford’s campus feels,” she says.

      The classes will be offered on a platform supplied by Novoed, a virtual education company started by former Stanford professor Amin Saberi and Stanford Ph.D. student Farnaz Ronaghi. The B-school has invested a significant chunk of its resources in launching the program: About 10 to 15 faculty members are slated to teach the courses. In addition to building a studio where it will film course videos, the school has hired a growing pool of educational technology experts and motion graphic designers to work on the courses, according to Witters.

      “This is by far the most serious and most significant initiative by GSB in the online realm,” Saberi says.

      People go to business school for more than just lectures, Saberi says, and online programs should be as good at teaching the numbers of business as the art of it. “What we are planning to do is to create a very similar environment online where they can acquire softer skills and build a network of peers.”

      The program’s $16,000 price tag dwarfs the online offerings of Stanford’s competitors, including Harvard Business Schools $1,500 nine-week online program and the Wharton School’s entirely free first-year MBA classes, which it put on the virtual platform Coursera last fall.

      The program may seem less pricey, though, to the company executives it’s intended for. Business schools have traditionally sold certificates to working professionals for tens, if not hundreds, of thousands of dollars. Stanford’s own six-week, on-campus program costs executives $62,500.

      To Novoed, which also provides technology to Wharton, the Haas School of Business, and the Darden School of Business, the Internet is an obvious place for business schools to expand their lucrative executive education programs.

      Saberi says companies are interested in elite training programs that don’t require employees to leave their desks. “We expect that programs like this are going to grow.”

      From US News in 2014
      Best Online Degree Programs (ranked)
      ---
      http://www.usnews.com/education/online-education

      Best Online Undergraduate Bachelors Degrees --- http://www.usnews.com/education/online-education/bachelors/rankings
      Central Michigan is the big winner

      Best Online Graduate Business MBA Programs --- http://www.usnews.com/education/online-education/mba/rankings
      Indiana University is the big winner

      Best Online Graduate Education Programs --- http://www.usnews.com/education/online-education/education/rankings
      Northern Illinois is the big winner

      Best Online Graduate Engineering Programs --- http://www.usnews.com/education/online-education/engineering/rankings
      Columbia University is the big winner

      Best Online Graduate Information Technology Programs ---
      http://www.usnews.com/education/online-education/computer-information-technology/rankings
      The University of Southern California is the big winner

      Best Online Graduate Nursing Programs --- http://www.usnews.com/education/online-education/nursing/rankings
      St. Xavier University is the big winner

      US News Degree Finder --- http://www.usnews.com/education/online-education/features/multistep-oe?s_cid=54089
      This beats those self-serving for-profit university biased Degree Finders

      US News has tried for years to rank for-profit universities, but they don't seem to want to provide the data.

       

      Bob Jensen's threads on fee-based education and training alternatives ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/CrossBorder.htm

    • Robert E Jensen

      "Enrollment Woes Continue for U. of Phoenix," Inside Higher Ed, March 26, 2015 ---
      https://www.insidehighered.com/quicktakes/2015/03/26/enrollment-woes-continue-u-phoenix

      Jensen Comment
      An enormous problem for all online programs from for-profit university is the rise in the popularity and quality of online degree programs from major state-supported universities. Search for over 1,200 online programs at
      http://www.usnews.com/education/online-education
      This is my recommended search engine for online degree programs.
      Note the links to US News rankings of these online programs at the above site.

      Don't trust those online search programs sponsored by for-profit universities because they exclude the affordable and higher quality online programs from major non-profit universities. Almost daily I get requests to link to one of these misleading search programs. I think people get paid if they can get Webmasters like me to link to these search programs (generally it is the same misleading search program under a different name).

      Bob Jensen's threads for online education and training programs ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/CrossBorder.htm

    • Robert E Jensen

      "How ‘Elite’ Universities Are Using Online Education," by Steve Kolowich, Chronicle of Higher Education, April 10, 2015 ---
      http://chronicle.com/article/How-Elite-Universities/229233/?cid=at&utm_source=at&utm_medium=en

      After years of skepticism, higher education’s upper class has finally decided that online learning is going to play an important role in its future. But what will that role be?

      Recently, conversations about "elite" online education has revolved around the free online courses, aka MOOCs, which Stanford, MIT, Harvard, and dozens of other top universities started offering several years ago. But it soon became clear that high marks in those courses would not translate to academic credit at the institutions offering them (or anywhere else).

      So how exactly does online education figure into the future of elite higher education? Judging by what we’ve seen so far, the answer can be divided into three parts.

      1. Free online courses for everyone.
       

      MOOCs are the McMansions of online higher education — capacious, impressive-looking, and easy to supply to the masses once professors have drawn up the blueprints.

      Families who want to work with the architects directly are not opting for a sequence of free online courses instead of an exclusive residential program that ends with a degree. Even if the MOOCs lose money, wealthier universities can afford to take a hit — especially if it means increasing their visibility in valuable overseas markets.

      Despite their flagging hype, MOOCs remain very popular. Top institutions will probably continue to build them.


       

      2. Paid online courses for professional graduate programs.

      Yale University recently unveiled a new master’s program for aspiring physician’s assistants, offered through its medical school. The program will also involve a lot of fieldwork, but much of the academic coursework will be delivered online. It is the second program Yale has created along these lines; the other is a partially online doctoral degree in nursing, which the university announced in 2011.

      Degrees in fields like health care and teaching are in high demand, and many lesser-known players have grabbed big chunks of that market online by assuring prospective students that they can go back to school without upending their lives. Yale is not alone in its effort to claim its slice of the pie; graduate schools at the Johns Hopkins University, Georgetown University, the University of California at Berkeley, and others have also started offering online versions of their professional master’s programs.

      Online does not fundamentally threaten the appeal of professional programs, where the "student experience" is not as sacrosanct as it is at undergraduate colleges. Most people who enroll are working adults who already went through dorm life and student organizations and late-night philosophical chats with future members of their wedding parties. They are now mainly interested in learning a trade.

      3. Online components in face-to-face undergraduate courses.
       

      In November 2012, a consortium of 10 prestigious colleges announced that they would collaborate with 2U, an online "enabler" company, to build fully online courses that undergraduates could take for credit. The stigma on virtual learning had faded enough that administrators at those colleges — Duke University, Emory University, Washington University in St. Louis, and others — were willing to give it a shot.

      A year and a half later, the consortium was kaput. The faculty at Duke nixed the partnership with 2U. Other colleges went ahead with the experiment, but quickly came to a verdict: Thanks, but no thanks.

      That does not mean online education has no role to play in undergraduate courses. This spring, Bowdoin College is offering a partially online course in financial accounting, taught remotely by a professor at Dartmouth College’s business school. (The Maine college is supplementing those online sessions with weekly meetings on campus, led by a member its own faculty.) Selective outsourcing could become a trend at top colleges that want to add (or license) specialized courses without hiring new professors.

      Continued in article

      Jensen Comment
      There may be a difference between the most prestigious highly endowed universities and other universities to the extent that distance education courses are used as cash cows. For example, at the University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee students pay more for an online section of a course than they do for an onsite section of that same course possibly taught by the same instructor. If the online course is taught by a low-paid adjunct instructor the online course may even cost less to deliver.

      Thus online courses that are priced higher become cash cows as well as serving a wider set of prospective students. Pricing of goods and services generally takes demand functions and price elasticity into account. Often there is more demand from part-time students for online courses, and universities may fill online sections with higher prices (hence low elasticity).

      Bob Jensen's threads on fee-based distance education and training ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/CrossBorder.htm

      Bob Jensen threads on free MOOCs from prestigious universities ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/000aaa/updateee.htm#OKI

    • Robert E Jensen

      How Business Higher Education and Training is Changing

      "Coming to a Business School Near You: Disruption (Part 2)," by Margaret Andrews, Inside Higher Ed, April 13, 2015 ---
      https://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/stratedgy/coming-business-school-near-you-disruption-part-2

      . . .

      New Entrants With New Offerings

      A wide array of players are entering the executive education and corporate training market and here are some recent developments:

      • McKinsey, one of the top strategy consultancies in the world, recently launched McKinsey Academy. This new platform uses McKinsey consultants to teach and give feedback, social learning and group-based projects, and adaptive learning and game mechanics to help companies develop their internal talent. Courses include Business Strategy, Mastering Challenging Conversations, and McKinsey’s Approach to Problem Solving, among others. 
      • Udemy for Business offers companies a way to “train your employees better, faster, and more efficiently than ever before” by offering courses in programming, web design, digital marketing and business skills, among others. Client companies include many of the multinationals that business school executive education units covet. 
      • LinkedIn recently acquired Lynda.com, an online learning company known for content focusing on creative skills – and now moving into business topics – as part of LinkedIn's strategy to become a professional development network.
      • Skillshare is “a learning community for creators” and offers a series of online courses to students who pay $10/month for unlimited access to courses taught by practitioners. Skillshare, launched late last year, now has over 750,000 students and courses range from Email Marketing, Entrepreneurship, and Photography to Visual Storytelling and Getting Started in Hand Lettering.  Companies can purchase an enterprise license and many of Silicon Valley’s rising stars are clients. 
      • Coursera offers Wharton’s Business Foundation series of four courses (Marketing, Financial Accounting, Operations Management, and Corporate Finance).  Through Coursera’s Signature Track, students can earn a specialization certificate for $595 and completing all four courses plus a capstone project. 

      University and Business Schools are Innovating, too

      That’s not to say that universities and business schools are not innovating, too.  For example:

      • Georgia Tech announced an online Master of Science in Computer Science, offered in collaboration with Udacity and AT&T. The program is delivered entirely through Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) and costs under $7,000. Could a business degree be next?
      • IMD is getting closer to business through a new partnership with Cisco valued at $10 million US, to “develop thought leadership and address business challenges in digital transformation.” The idea behind the partnership is for IMD “to become the world leading destination for research, innovation and leadership to drive digital transformation to all aspects of enterprises, in every industry.” 
      • Harvard Business School launched HBX, a suite of three business fundamental courses – business analytics, economics for managers, and financial accounting.  They also offer individual courses (the first one launched was disruptive strategy, with Clay Christensen).  Coming soon is HBX Live!, which allows participants worldwide to interact with faculty and each other in real-time.

      Low-Cost MBA Alternatives

      From Kigali, Rwanda, one woman is piecing together the equivalent of an MBA by taking a series of Massively Open Online Courses (MOOCs) from different providers. For less than $1000 US she’s taken courses from some of the top business schools in the world and her No-Pay MBA website offers information to help others do the same.

      Students can now take a variety of courses from various providers in a “cafeteria style” like the example above.  While this buffet of courses doesn’t (yet) add up to a degree, at some point some organization is going to figure out how to assign/award credit for these disparate classes – and accredit the program of study.  Then students will be able to bundle together their own degrees and certificates, choosing the best courses from the best schools and building their own All-Star MBA  (or some other degree or certification) program.

      In a recent Financial Times article, Rich Lyons, dean of the Haas School of Business at UC Berkeley, reiterated his belief that 50% of business schools could be out of business within the next ten years, stating:

      There are over 10,000 business schools in the world so when you start thinking about that group from 1,000 to 10,000, I think curated MOOC content and better ways of credentialing students is going to be a heck of a threat to a lot of those players.”

      Jensen Comment
      I think there's increasing accountability required in both the education and training markets. In particular, for-profit-universities of questionable quality are hurting badly or shutting down entirely. Innovative programs more closely tied to respected traditional universities (think Coursera) or top private sector companies like McKinsey and Cisco  are rising up.

      We are in a transition period where degrees and diplomas still matter, but badges and certificates of competency are on the rise ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/CrossBorder.htm#Badges

      Scenarios of Higher Education for Year 2020 ---
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5gU3FjxY2uQ
      The above great video, among other things, discusses how "badges" of academic education and training accomplishment may become more important in the job market than tradition transcript credits awarded by colleges. Universities may teach the courses (such as free MOOCs) whereas private sector companies may award the "badges" or "credits" or "certificates." The new term for such awards is a "microcredential."

      Competency-Based Learning --- http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/Assess.htm#ConceptKnowledge

      "If B.A.’s Can’t Lead Graduates to Jobs, Can Badges Do the Trick?" by Goldie Blumenstyk, Chronicle of Higher Education, March 2, 2015 ---
      http://chronicle.com/article/If-BA-s-Can-t-Lead/228073/?cid=at&utm_source=at&utm_medium=en

      Employers say they are sick of encountering new college graduates who lack job skills. And colleges are sick of hearing that their young alumni aren’t employable.

      Could a new experiment to design employer-approved "badges" leave everyone a little less frustrated?

      Employers and a diverse set of more than a half-dozen universities in the Washington area are about to find out, through a project that they hope will become a national model for workplace badges.

      The effort builds on the burgeoning national movement for badges and other forms of "micro­credentials." It also pricks at much broader questions about the purpose and value of a college degree in an era when nearly nine out of 10 students say their top reason for going to college is to get a good job.

      The "21st Century Skills Badging Challenge" kicks off with a meeting on Thursday. For the next nine months, teams from the universities, along with employers and outside experts, will try to pinpoint the elements that underlie skills like leadership, effective storytelling, and the entrepreneurial mind-set. They’ll then try to find ways to assess students’ proficiency in those elements and identify outside organizations to validate those skills with badges that carry weight with employers.

      The badges are meant to incorporate the traits most sought by employers, often referred to as "the four C’s": critical thinking, communication, creativity, and collaboration.

      "We want this to become currency on the job market," says Kathleen deLaski, founder of the Education Design Lab, a nonprofit consulting organization that is coordinating the project.

      No organizations have yet been selected or agreed to provide validations. But design-challenge participants say there’s a clear vision: Perhaps an organization like TED issues a badge in storytelling. Or a company like Pixar, or IDEO, the design and consulting firm, offers a badge in creativity.

      If those badges gain national acceptance, Ms. deLaski says, they could bring more employment opportunities to students at non-elite colleges, which rarely attract the same attention from recruiters as the Ivies, other selective private colleges, or public flagships. "I’m most excited about it as an access tool," she says.

      ‘Celebrating’ and ‘Translating’

      The very idea of badges may suggest that the college degree itself isn’t so valuable—at least not to employers.

      Badge backers prefer a different perspective. They say there’s room for both badges and degrees. And if anything, the changing job market demands both.

      Through their diplomas and transcripts, "students try to signal, and they have the means to signal, their academic accomplishments," says Angel Cabrera, president of George Mason University, which is involved in the project. "They just don’t have the same alternative for the other skills that employers say they want."

      Nor is the badging effort a step toward vocationalizing the college degree, participants say. As Ms. deLaski puts it: "It’s celebrating what you learn in the academic setting and translating it for the work force."

      Yet as she and others acknowledge, badges by themselves won’t necessarily satisfy employers who now think graduates don’t cut it.

      That’s clear from how employer organizations that may work on the project regard badges. "We’re presuming that there is an additional skill set that needs to be taught," says Michael Caplin, president of the Tysons Partnership, a Northern Virginia economic-development organization. "It’s not just a packaging issue."

      In other words, while a move toward badges could require colleges to rethink what they teach, it would certainly cause them to re-examine how they teach it. At least some university partners in the badging venture say they’re on board with that.

      "Some of what we should be doing is reimagining some disciplinary content," says Randall Bass, vice provost for education at Georgetown University, another participant in the project.

      Mr. Bass, who also oversees the "Designing the Future(s) of the University" project at Georgetown, says many smart curricular changes that are worth pursuing, no matter what, could also lend themselves to the goals of the badging effort. (At the master’s-degree level, for example, Georgetown has already begun offering a one-credit courses in grant writing.)

      "We should make academic work more like work," with team-based approaches, peer learning, and iterative exercises, he says. "People would be ready for the work force as well as getting an engagement with intellectual ideas."

      Employers’ gripes about recent college graduates are often hard to pin down. "It depends on who’s doing the whining," Mr. Bass quips. (The critique he does eventually summarize—that employers feel "they’re not getting students who are used to working"—is a common one.)

      Where Graduates Fall Short

      So one of the first challenges for the badging exercise is to better understand exactly what employers want and whether colleges are able to provide it—or whether they’re already doing so.

      After all, notes Mr. Bass, many believe that colleges should produce job-ready graduates simply by teaching students to be agile thinkers who can adapt if their existing careers disappear. "That’s why I think ‘employers complain, dot dot dot,’ needs to be parsed," he says.

      Mr. Caplin says his organization plans to poll its members to better understand where they see college graduates as falling short.

      Continued in article