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    Emerging Technologies in Distance Education -- Outstanding...
    blog entry posted September 7, 2010 by Richard E Lillie, last edited May 22, 2012, tagged research 
    18427 Views, 106 Comments
    title:
    Emerging Technologies in Distance Education -- Outstanding Resource
    intro text:

    In July, 2010 AU Press (Athabasca University, Canada) published a book that I think you will find is an excellent resource for ideas about using technology in teaching and learning.  The book entitled Emerging Technologies in Distance Education is edited by George Veletsianos.

    AU Press makes the book available for free in Adobe Acrobat (.pdf) format.  You may download the entire publication or selected chapters.

    This book is worth exploring.  It may not turn you into a "pro from Dover" (to draw on the line from the movie Mash).  However, it should help you better understand how to use technology when you design course materials and share them with your students.

    Enjoy.

    Rick Lillie (Cal State, San Bernardino)

    Emerging Technologies in Distance Education

    Comment

    • Robert E Jensen

      The Alternative Model:  Partnerships Between Not-for-Profit and For-Profit Education Distance Education Ventures
      The model is not new but it may become much more common as for-profit stand-alones become more stressed by regulations and drying up markets

      .

      "Outsourcing Plus," by Steve Kolowich, Inside Higher Ed, October 12, 2010 ---
      http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2010/10/12/azstate

      .

      With budgets tight and the commercial market flush with companies willing to take on various tasks that come with running a university, it has become relatively common for institutions to outsource parts of their operations to outside companies.

      .

      It is less common for a public university to entrust an outsider with such a wide swath of duties that it calls that private company an equal partner in online education. But Arizona State University announced on Monday that it is doing just that with Pearson, the education and media company.

      .

      Under the agreement, the Arizona State faculty will teach online courses through Pearson’s learning management platform, LearningStudio, using the tools embedded in that platform to collect and analyze data in hopes of improving student performance and retention. Pearson will also help with enrollment management and “prospect generation," while providing more "customer-friendly" support services for students, the university says.

      .

      Arizona State, meanwhile, says it will retain control over all things academic, including instruction and curriculum development.

      .

      Universities often strike deals with private companies to manage parts of their online operations, particularly when they are trying to quickly grow their online enrollments, which is Arizona State’s stated goal in this case (now serving 3,000 online students, it hopes to grow to somewhere between 17,000 and 30,000 within five years). Companies such as Embanet, 2Tor, SunGard Higher Education, Bisk Education, Colloquy, and Compass Knowledge Group have, to varying degrees, taken over online program management at other name-brand universities in exchange for a cut of the tuition revenue.

      .

      Jensen Comment
      There is obviously a spectrum of partnerships that will probably emerge. At one end the courses are totally managed by a not-for-profit university that only uses the for-profit partner's media delivery services. Then there might be a move up where selected for-profit's courses are selectively brought into the curriculum. Then there might be entire specialized programs that are brought into the curriculum such as executive programs (non-degree) or undergraduate pharmacy or even accounting degree programs.

      .

      The next move up the ladder would be for-profit graduate degree programs where assessment is controlled by the not-for-profit partner. For example, Western Governor's University now has over 10,000 students in competency-based programs. One might imagine partnering of WGU with a for-profit distance education MBA program where the competency assessments and degrees are administered by WGU.

      Lastly, one might envision doctoral programs, although these might come last because they are typically money losers if they have respectability in the market such as AACSB respectability. For example, Capella now has an online accounting doctoral program that I view as a fraud ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/Crossborder.htm#CommercialPrograms
      One might envision a partnering with some respected state university, such as ASU, that greatly alters the curriculum and the assessment process and the dissertation advising to bring Cpaella's accounting doctoral program more in line with ASU's onsite accounting doctoral program. This off course is probably way, way down the road.

      .

      Bob Jensen's threads on the sad state of accounting doctoral programs ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/Theory01.htm#DoctoralPrograms

    • Robert E Jensen

      Question
      How do Texas university versus California university accounting programs differ due to a dictatorial stance of a Texas Board of accountancy stance?

      Answer
      The Texas Board (read that Big Brother) declared that online accounting that Texas universities are severely restricted as to what accounting education courses may be offered online as well as onsite. Texas Universities can offer online accounting courses but chances are that the Texas Board will not allow them when accounting graduates apply to take the CPA examination.

      This is just one of a number of ways that the Texas Big Brother takes away accounting pedagogy discretion of all public and private universities in Texas.

      Another way Big Brother reared its ugly head was its declaration that, if a Texas university course catalog or online accounting Website listed Robert E. Jensen, PhD, CPA in the course catalog or on the university Website, the university must change it to Robert Jensen, PhD if Professor Jensen is licensed in one of the other 49 states instead of Texas. After teaching for 20 years at Trinity University of Texas, Big Brother sent Bob Jensen a letter late in his career saying that since his resume is posted online he must remove the following item from his publically-available resume ---
      http://chronicle.com/blogs/wiredcampus/u-of-california-readies-its-for-credit-online-course-venture/28027?sid=wc&utm_source=wc&utm_medium=en

      Holder of C.P.A. Certificate 1128, Chapter 32, August 1961 (Colorado)  No longer a practicing CPA

      Big Brother said that the wording "No longer a practicing CPA" would not qualify for any such professor of accounting in Texas who did not hold an active Texas license to practice.

      Bob Jensen, however, did not roll over so easily for Big Brother. Bob Jensen often had lunch with a judge in the state of Texas. One phone call from the judge to Big Brother resulted in a prized letter sent by Big Brother to Bob Jensen. The letter stated that Big Brother conceded that it did not have the jurisdiction to demand that Bob Jensen surrender is Colorado CPA certificate or demand that he remove reference to it in his resume. To my knowledge, however, professors who hold Texas CPA certificates and are not keeping their licenses up to date with fees and CPE credits must surrender their Texas CPA certificates to Big Brother.

      But Big Brother is Still Interfering in Pedagogy Choices for Accounting Programs in Texas universities (public or private)
      Thanks to the Texas Board Big Brother, accounting programs in Texas will never be able to do what California universities can do if faculty chooses to do so.
      "U. of California Readies Its For-Credit Online-Course Venture," by Travis Kaya, Chronicle of Higher Education, November 4, 2010 ---
      http://chronicle.com/blogs/wiredcampus/u-of-california-readies-its-for-credit-online-course-venture/28027?sid=wc&utm_source=wc&utm_medium=en 

      The University of California has begun to ask faculty to design and teach online courses for a pilot program that could pave the way for widespread Web offerings at the state’s most-selective public institutions.

      But that doesn’t mean the UC system is ready to adopt a much-anticipated and already-controversial online degree program just yet.

      The UC Online Instruction Pilot Project, run out of the university’s Office of the President, announced on Wednesday that it is looking for 25 faculty volunteers across the system’s 10 campuses to develop and teach online courses in the 2011-12 academic year. Participants will be chosen by a faculty-appointed review committee in January, and will work with Web developers and other university faculty members over the course of the pilot project. “We’re really looking for a coalition of the willing,” said Daniel Greenstein, vice provost for academic planning. “We’re asking people to work in a common environment.”

      Although the university now offers noncredit online instruction, the 25 pilot courses will offer UC credit and require the approval of the Academic Senate. The courses will be evaluated by faculty members as they are being developed and taught to determine how online instruction can be incorporated into the university’s course offerings. The faculty members will be looking especially at the quality and cost of online instruction as well as faculty workload. According to Mr. Greenstein, the central question is, “Can you actually deliver education affordably online?”

      The university’s announcement comes a little more than a week after the California Legislative Analyst’s Office, which advises the State Legislature, came out in support of online classes within the UC system as a way to improve access and reduce costs in the face of an expected increase in enrollment.

      According to Mr. Greenstein, building up the university’s Web offerings may be one way of dealing with a growing student body at UC campuses—but it won’t be an end-all solution.

      “This problem of scale is not a new problem, and we’ve been innovating to deal with it for the past two generations,” he said. Online education is just “one of the many solutions that we’re going to need to explore.”

      Mr. Greenstein sees Web education as a supplement to existing programs that will allow the university to stretch its resources. The pilot program will, for instance, focus on lower-level “gateway courses”—prerequisites taken en masse by incoming students—to free up space and faculty time for higher-level courses.

      “We’ll be judged on the extent that we’ll be able to cater to the top 10 or 12 percent of California high-school graduates,” both online and in the classroom, Mr. Greenstein said, not just on the number of Web courses.

      Since the pilot program was announced over the summer, Mr. Greenstein said he has heard from faculty members on all sides of the issue, including many who are skeptical that online education could ever compare to classroom learning. But that skepticism is what’s driving the pilot project.

      “Let’s put some more data under what could be an ideological discussion,” he said. “It’s a challenging discussion, but it ought to be a very interesting one.”

      Jensen Comment
      Yeah I know that any Texas university is allowed by Big Brother to offer up to three courses online, but Big Brother dictates to all Texas universities that the accounting faculty cannot create entire online undergraduate and graduate Texas accounting programs banned by Big Brother. Graduates of those horrid online accounting degree programs at the University of Wisconsin and Maryland and anywhere else that are hired by a CPA firm in Texas will never be given permission to take the CPA examination in Texas. Big Brother has spoken.

      Let's face the facts as implied by the Big Brother State Board in Texas. Even though quality distance education degree programs in accounting can be offered by universities in the other 49 states, Texas university accounting faculty are incapable of designing and implementing comparable distance accounting education programs in Texas. Big Brother has spoken! Got that?

    • Robert E Jensen

      "Teaching Online Professors ... Online," by Steve Kolowich, Inside Higher Ed, November 10, 2010 ---
      http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2010/11/10/pearson

      Will colleges and universities buy online courses designed to train the instructors who teach online courses?

      Pearson, the education and media conglomerate, is betting on it. The company will announce today a plan to sell courses aimed at preparing professors to teach online.

      As more traditional institutions look to scale up their online offerings, Pearson -- which already sells some pre-packaged courses, as well as textbooks and online learning platforms — sees demand for training rising. “We’re pretty bullish on the opportunity," says Don Kilburn, CEO of Pearson Learning Solutions. “There’s a real need to help.”

      Pearson officials say the target audience for the new courses, scheduled to be offered beginning in January, will be institutions and systems looking to outsource training of existing faculty as they grow their Web-based programs, as well as freelancers looking to bolster their résumés as they apply for adjunct gigs. The company is also hoping to team up with one or more accredited graduate programs to offer the courses as part of a degree — or at least a certificate — in online teaching.

      The move is part of Pearson’s strategy to expand beyond publishing into more segments of the e-learning industry — not unlike Blackboard, which recently announced that it will soon start packaging and selling remedial education courses to community colleges in conjunction with another e-learning company, K-12.

      Like Blackboard’s remedial courses, Pearson’s courses in online teaching are still in development. The Louisiana Community and Technical College System is piloting some of the courses, but it is only two weeks in — and while Pearson has provided a good foundation, there is still tweaking to be done before the courses are shelf-ready, says Tammy Hall, director of academic services there.

      Still, a preliminary menu available on Pearson’s website lists eight course titles: Introduction to Online Learning, Instructor Technology Preparation, Instructional Design for Online Learning, Promoting Student Success in the Online Learning Environment, Assessing Knowledge and Skills in the Online Learning Environment, Beyond the Online Classroom, Online Teaching Internship, and Course Design/Project Practicum.

      The company plans to market the courses in the K-12 and corporate training sectors too, but it plans to do about half of its business in higher education, Kilburn says.

      Many higher ed institutions with large online enrollments — including the University of Phoenix, the largest employer of online instructors — run their own training programs. But there are a few third-party providers that handle online instructor training, both for individuals and for institutions.

      One is the Sloan Consortium, a nonprofit that focuses on technology and online education. Sloan runs nearly 100 workshops, averaging about a week in length and costing $400 to $500 each for individuals or $3,500 for a 100-seat institutional license. It provides online training for around 2,500 instructors per year, according to John Bourne, the organization’s executive director.

      Another nonprofit, called LERN, offers a three-course sequence, plus course materials, for about $800 per head. LERN has found an accredited partner in the University of South Dakota, which offers a handful of LERN courses in online instruction for credit toward a master’s degree in educational administration. Outside of that, the organization handles online teacher training for a number of institutions, including Middle Tennessee State University, Missouri Baptist University, New Mexico State University, Norfolk State University, and several University of Texas campuses, according to Tammy Peterson, head of customer service at LERN.

      Kilburn, the Pearson executive, says it is too early to estimate how his company will price its courses. But it is hoping to attract not only institutions looking to grow online that lack any scalable training mechanism for faculty, but also institutions that already do online instructor training in-house that might decide it is cheaper or more effective to outsource that task to Pearson. “I do think there will be some folks who have their own in-house programs who will look at [our offering] and evaluate it,” Kilburn says.

      Continued in article

      The Sad Case of Accounting Education in Texas:  How Historic Brick and Mortar Universities Fail Students Who Can Only Earn Credit Via Distance Education ---
      http://www.cs.trinity.edu/~rjensen/temp/TexasBigBrother.htm

       

    • Robert E Jensen

      "Teaching Online Professors ... Online," by Steve Kolowich, Inside Higher Ed, November 10, 2010 ---
      http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2010/11/10/pearson

      Will colleges and universities buy online courses designed to train the instructors who teach online courses?

      Pearson, the education and media conglomerate, is betting on it. The company will announce today a plan to sell courses aimed at preparing professors to teach online.

      As more traditional institutions look to scale up their online offerings, Pearson -- which already sells some pre-packaged courses, as well as textbooks and online learning platforms — sees demand for training rising. “We’re pretty bullish on the opportunity," says Don Kilburn, CEO of Pearson Learning Solutions. “There’s a real need to help.”

      Pearson officials say the target audience for the new courses, scheduled to be offered beginning in January, will be institutions and systems looking to outsource training of existing faculty as they grow their Web-based programs, as well as freelancers looking to bolster their résumés as they apply for adjunct gigs. The company is also hoping to team up with one or more accredited graduate programs to offer the courses as part of a degree — or at least a certificate — in online teaching.

      The move is part of Pearson’s strategy to expand beyond publishing into more segments of the e-learning industry — not unlike Blackboard, which recently announced that it will soon start packaging and selling remedial education courses to community colleges in conjunction with another e-learning company, K-12.

      Like Blackboard’s remedial courses, Pearson’s courses in online teaching are still in development. The Louisiana Community and Technical College System is piloting some of the courses, but it is only two weeks in — and while Pearson has provided a good foundation, there is still tweaking to be done before the courses are shelf-ready, says Tammy Hall, director of academic services there.

      Still, a preliminary menu available on Pearson’s website lists eight course titles: Introduction to Online Learning, Instructor Technology Preparation, Instructional Design for Online Learning, Promoting Student Success in the Online Learning Environment, Assessing Knowledge and Skills in the Online Learning Environment, Beyond the Online Classroom, Online Teaching Internship, and Course Design/Project Practicum.

      The company plans to market the courses in the K-12 and corporate training sectors too, but it plans to do about half of its business in higher education, Kilburn says.

      Many higher ed institutions with large online enrollments — including the University of Phoenix, the largest employer of online instructors — run their own training programs. But there are a few third-party providers that handle online instructor training, both for individuals and for institutions.

      One is the Sloan Consortium, a nonprofit that focuses on technology and online education. Sloan runs nearly 100 workshops, averaging about a week in length and costing $400 to $500 each for individuals or $3,500 for a 100-seat institutional license. It provides online training for around 2,500 instructors per year, according to John Bourne, the organization’s executive director.

      Another nonprofit, called LERN, offers a three-course sequence, plus course materials, for about $800 per head. LERN has found an accredited partner in the University of South Dakota, which offers a handful of LERN courses in online instruction for credit toward a master’s degree in educational administration. Outside of that, the organization handles online teacher training for a number of institutions, including Middle Tennessee State University, Missouri Baptist University, New Mexico State University, Norfolk State University, and several University of Texas campuses, according to Tammy Peterson, head of customer service at LERN.

      Kilburn, the Pearson executive, says it is too early to estimate how his company will price its courses. But it is hoping to attract not only institutions looking to grow online that lack any scalable training mechanism for faculty, but also institutions that already do online instructor training in-house that might decide it is cheaper or more effective to outsource that task to Pearson. “I do think there will be some folks who have their own in-house programs who will look at [our offering] and evaluate it,” Kilburn says.

      Continued in article

      The Sad Case of Accounting Education in Texas:  How Historic Brick and Mortar Universities Fail Students Who Can Only Earn Credit Via Distance Education ---
      http://www.cs.trinity.edu/~rjensen/temp/TexasBigBrother.htm

       

    • Robert E Jensen

      "Enrollment in Online Courses Increases at the Highest Rate Ever," by Tavis Kaya, Chronicle of Higher Education, November 16, 2010 ---
      http://chronicle.com/blogs/wiredcampus/enrollment-in-online-courses-increases-at-the-highest-rate-ever/28204?sid=wc&utm_source=wc&utm_medium=en

      Despite predictions that the growth of online education would begin to level off, colleges reported the highest-ever annual increase in online enrollment—more than 21 percent—last year, according to a report on an annual survey of 2,600 higher-education institutions from the Sloan Consortium and the Babson Survey Research Group.

      In fall 2009, colleges—including public, nonprofit private, and for-profit private institutions—reported that one million more students were enrolled in at least one Web-based course, bringing the total number of online students to 5.6 million. That unexpected increase—which topped the previous year’s 17-percent rise—may have been helped by higher demand for education in a rocky economy and an uptick in the number of colleges adopting online courses.

      Although the survey found sustained interest in online courses across all sectors, there was a spike in the number of for-profit institutions—a 20-percent increase over last year—that said online education is critical to their long-term strategies. However, more public colleges than  private for-profits—74.9 percent versus 60.5 percent—say it’s part of their long-term plans.

      Elaine Allen, associate professor of statistics and entrepreneurship at Babson College and co-director of the Babson Survey Research Group, said that the disproportionate increase in the for-profit sector may mean that online programs are becoming their “bread and butter.” Colleges are telling themselves that “if we want to grow and have profits, we need to be in the online sector,” she said.

      Increased government scrutiny of the for-profit sector has complicated plans for expansion online. Approximately 32 percent of for-profit institutions—compared with about 17 percent of public colleges—said it will be difficult to comply with government regulations on financial aid. Those new regulations include a pending “gainful employmentrule that could cut off federal aid to programs with high levels of student debt relative to what students make after graduation—a move that could slash revenue for institutions dependent on student-aid money. “For the first time, we saw the government regulate financial aid and some kind of return on investment,” Ms. Allen said. “The for-profits are feeling the pressure there.”

      Administrators also continue to wrestle with the question of quality in online education. According to the survey report, “Class Differences: Online Education in the United States, 2010,” 66 percent of college administrators say that online education is the same as or better than face-to-face classes—a slight decline from last year. Still, Ms. Allen said it appears that more faculty members are warming up to online education as a quality alternative to face-to-face learning and are finding new ways to use the technology.

      Ms. Allen expects Web enrollment to plateau as more competitors—whether they are Web programs from established universities or from new for-profit institutions—hit the market. And for-profit colleges will probably take advantage of their more-nimble business models to expand much more rapidly online than will their government-reliant public competitors. As more budget cuts loom, public institutions are already beginning to “feel competition from the for-profits,” she said.

      Bob Jensen's threads on online training and education alternatives are at ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/CrossBorder.htm

       

    • Robert E Jensen

      Prestigious U.K. MBA Program Offers Courses on Facebook
      "British Business School Offers M.B.A. Courses on Facebook." by Travis Kaya, Chronicle of Higher Education, November 30, 2010 ---
      http://chronicle.com/blogs/wiredcampus/british-university-offers-m-b-a-courses-on-facebook/28463?sid=wc&utm_source=wc&utm_medium=en

      Facebook has changed the way students, faculty members, and administrators communicate outside the classroom. Now, with the introduction of the London School of Business & Finance’s Global MBA Facebook app, Facebook is becoming the classroom.

      The Global MBA app—introduced in October—lets users sample typical business-school courses like corporate finance and organizational behavior through the social-networking site. The free course material includes interactive message boards, a note-taking tool, and video lectures and discussions with insiders from industry giants like Accenture Management Consulting and Deloitte. This may be a good way to market a school, notes an observer from a business-school accrediting organization, but it may not be the best way to deliver courses.

      Unlike most online business courses, the Global MBA program will not require students to pay an enrollment fee up front. Instead, students can access basic course material free of charge and pay the school only when they are ready to prepare for their exams. School administrators hope that letting students “test drive” the online courses before actually shelling out the tuition money will boost graduation rates.

      While the school offers a large collection of study material on Facebook—including 80 hours of Web video—students seeking formal accreditation must qualify for entrance into the M.B.A. program. Once enrolled in the paid course, students are given access to additional content on the business school’s InterActive course management system, and are required to sit for examinations—like they would if they were enrolled in more traditional distance-learning or brick-and-mortar programs. The Facebook MBA program is accredited by the University of Wales and costs a total of £14,500—about $22,000.

      Steve Parscale, director of accreditation for the Kansas-based Accreditation Council for Business Schools & Programs, said sample classes offered through social-networking sites could provide great advertising opportunities for online colleges. “The younger generation is all on social media,” Mr. Parscale said. “If you can get them on Facebook to test-drive a class, then you can get them to actually enroll.”

      Continued in article

      Bob Jensen's threads on distance education training and education alterntives ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/Crossborder.htm

       

    • Robert E Jensen

      Now that a landmark study conducted by the Community College Research Center at Columbia University has confirmed that students at two-year campuses perform worse in online courses than in the face-to-face version, perhaps we can move on the important question: What can we do about that?

      "Improving Online Success," by Rob Jenkins, Chronicle of Higher Education, August 16, 2011 ---
      http://chronicle.com/blogs/onhiring/improving-online-success/29390?sid=wc&utm_source=wc&utm_medium=en

      Jensen Comment
      Most of the performance inhibitors apply to onsite and well as online education, but there are some things that can be done to improve online learning for many students. The first task, in my opinion, is to determine if there are unique learning disabilities that should be dealt with separately.

      Bob Jensen's threads on Tools and Tricks of the Trade are at
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/000aaa/thetools.htm

    • Robert E Jensen

      Competency-Based Assessment --- http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/competency.htm

      There are a few really noteworthy competency-based distance education programs including Western Governors University (WGU) and the Chartered Accountancy School of Business (CASB)  in Canada. But these compentency-based programs typically have assigned instructors and bear the costs of those instructors. The instructors, however, do not assign grades to students.

      It appears that the Southern New Hampshire University (a private institution) is taking competency-based distance education to a new level by eliminating the instructors. It should be noted that SNHU has both an onsite campus and online degree programs.

      "Online Education Is Everywhere. What’s the Next Big Thing?" by Marc Parry, Chronicle of Higher Education, August 31, 2011 ---
      http://chronicle.com/blogs/wiredcampus/online-education-is-everywhere-whats-the-next-big-thing/32898?sid=wc&utm_source=wc&utm_medium=en

      . . .

      The vision is that students could sign up for self-paced online programs with no conventional instructors. They could work at their own speeds through engaging online content that offers built-in assessments, allowing them to determine when they are ready to move on. They could get help through networks of peers who are working on the same courses; online discussions could be monitored by subject experts. When they’re ready, students could complete a proctored assessment, perhaps at a local high school, or perhaps online. The university’s staff could then grade the assessment and assign credit.

      And the education could be far cheaper, because there would be no expensive instructor and students could rely on free, open educational resources rather than expensive textbooks. Costs to the student might include the assessment and the credits.

      “The whole model hinges on excellent assessment, a rock-solid confidence that the student has mastered the student-learning outcomes,” the memo says. “If we know with certainty that they have, we should no longer care if they raced through the course or took 18 months, or if they worked on their courses with the support of a local church organization or community center or on their own. The game-changing idea here is that when we have assessment right, we should not care how a student achieves learning. We can blow up the delivery models and be free to try anything that shows itself to work.”

      Continued in article

      "A Russian University Gets Creative Against Corruption:  With surveillance equipment and video campaigns, rector aims to eliminate bribery at Kazan State," by Anna Nemtsova, Chronicle of Higher Education, January 17, 2010 ---
      http://chronicle.com/article/A-Russian-University-Gets/63522/

      Jensen Comment
      In its early history, the University of Chicago had competency-based programs where grades were assigned solely on the basis of scores on final examinations. Students did not have to attend class.

      Bob Jensen's threads on competency-based assessment ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/competency.htm 

      Bob Jensen's threads on distance education alternatives are at
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/Crossborder.htm

      Bob Jensen's threads on higher education controversies are at
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/HigherEdControversies.htm

      I should point out that this is very similar to the AAA's Innovation in Accounting Education Award Winning BAM Pedagogy commenced at the University of Virginia (but there were instructors who did not teach) ---
       http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/265wp.htm

       

    • Robert E Jensen

      From the EDUCAUSE Annual Meetings in Philadelphia on October 20, 2011

      EDUCAUSE 2011 Annual Meeting Highlights as They Unfold This Week --- http://www.educause.edu/E2011

      "Myths of Online Education," by Steve Kolowich, Inside Higher Ed, October 21, 2011 ---
      http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2011/10/21/educational-technologists-defend-online-education 

      One of higher education’s biggest exports is skepticism. So it is perhaps unsurprising that, whereas many educators have questioned the virtue of online education, others would question the way in which the questioners have questioned online education.

      A panel of academic technologists ganged up on a straw-man version of the online education skeptic here at the annual Educause conference here on Thursday.

      The panel took aim at a number of questions that often come up when online education is put under the microscope, including: Does online education take more time? And does it enable cheating?

      Using these questions to prod the worthiness of online education is likely to lead to “causal fallacies” than useful insights, said George Otte, director of academic technology at the City University of New York System. “Just as you can lie with statistics, you can mislead with questions,” he said.

      For his part, Otte took aim at the question of online education being a time-suck for professors — a question that has prompted fears of faculty burnout. But the CUNY technologist suggested that this question does not adequately account for the cost, in time, of finding one’s footing on a new teaching platform.

      “We may be confounding the time it takes to do something with the time it takes to learn to do something,” Otte said. The first time instructors teach online, they tend to overcompensate for their ignorance by over-investing their time in the virtual classroom. But that does not mean they will not adjust and adapt — just as most instructors did to the circumstance and demands of classroom teaching when they began their careers.

      “A linguist once told me that if we were adults when we began language acquisition, and knew how hard it was and all it entailed, who would ever bother?” he continued. “But, of course, that all happens before we think we have a choice and when we’re really good at it.”

      In other words, developing fluency in a new medium might be more labor-intensive than sticking to grunts and gestures; but once everybody gets going, it opens up the process of exchanging information to new levels of complexity and understanding.

      The new opportunities inherent to online education come with new challenges, particularly when it comes to enforcing integrity rules. Hence the next question: Does online education enable cheating?

      Philip D. Long, a professor of innovation in educational technology at the University of Queensland, in Australia, suggested many issues that endanger the integrity of online learning, such as assessing individual contributions to group projects, are not unique to online education.

      Continued in article

      Bob Jensen's threads on education technology (including distance education) ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/000aaa/0000start.htm

      Bob Jensen's threads about asynchronous learning ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/255wp.htm

      Bob Jensen's threads about the dark side of education technology and distance education ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/000aaa/theworry.htm

    • Robert E Jensen

      Screencasting

      ScreenCast from TechSmith is a leading storage/server alternative for your Jing and Camtasia videos ---
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TechSmith

      However, there are quite a few other screeencast video capturing alternatives and hosts ---
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_screencasting_software
      This is a pretty impressive Wikipedia comparison site!

      Bob Jensen's video helpers ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/HelpersVideos.htm

    • Robert E Jensen

      Dropbox (Cloud Storage) --- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dropbox_%28service%29

      "Dropbox Will Simplify Your Life," by David Pogue, The New York Times, October 20, 2011 ---
      http://pogue.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/10/20/dropbox-will-simplify-your-life/

      Every time I’m tempted to write about some tech product that’s been around awhile, I’m torn. On one hand, I’ll be blasted by the technogeeks for being late to the party. On the other hand, it doesn’t seem right to keep something great hidden under a barrel from the rest of the world.

      So here goes: I love Dropbox.

      Continued in article

      October 22, 2011 reply from Rick Lillie

      I read David Pogue's post about Dropbox.  I agree it is easy to use and is a great tool for file sharing.

      There are many software programs and hosted collaboration services available (both free and for fee) that focus on file sharing as a way to collaborate.  But, file sharing is just one aspect of collaborating with others on a project.

      Dropbox is great for what it does.  There are alternatives that do much more than what Dropbox does. 

      For example, for the past few years, I have used Collanos Workplace as a way to collaborate with students on independent study and group projects.  Collanos is similar to Groove Networks (now part of enterprise edition of Microsoft Office).  Collanos emphasizes organizing the project and workflow and includes many options for communicating and incorporating other technology tools as needed to meet project needs.

      I've also used Collanos Workplace to collaborate with colleagues on research projects.  Recently, I've been using a great online hosted collaboration service called GlasscubesIt's more intuitive than Collanos and shifts the process to "the Cloud."

      There are lots of tech tools to use for research and classroom activities.  The key is to find the tool that "best fits" the needs of the project and the technology skills of both students and instructor.

      Best wishes,

      Rick Lillie, MAS, Ed.D., CPA
      Assistant Professor of Accounting
      Coordinator, Master of Science in Accountancy
      CSUSB, CBPA, Department of Accounting & Finance
      5500 University Parkway, JB-547
      San Bernardino, CA.  92407-2397

      Bob Jensen's threads on archiving and long-term storage ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/Bookbob4.htm#archiving

    • Robert E Jensen

      Course Management Systems/Learning Management Systems (CMS/LMS) ---
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Learning_management_system

      From the 2011 EDUCAUSE Annual Meetings
      "Educause Video Archive; Why You Hate Your CMS," by  Josh Keller, Chronicle of Higher Education, October 21, 2011 ---
      http://chronicle.com/blogs/wiredcampus/crosstalk-educause-video-archive-why-you-hate-your-cms/33885?sid=wc&utm_source=wc&utm_medium=en

      Educause Archive: Higher ed’s biggest tech conference is over, but Educause has posted a video archive of selected sessions. For those who missed them, be sure to check out Danah Boyd’s presentation on students and online privacy, a Pew presentation on trends in mobile learning, and The Chronicle’s panel on the challenges of the unbundled university.

      Mobile Growth: Mary Meeker, a former Morgan Stanley analyst who is one of the most perceptive thinkers on the future of technology, made her annual presentation on how the Internet is changing on Tuesday (slidesvideo). The presentation emphasizes the rapid growth of mobile devices and global Internet usage.

      The Hated CMS: Content-management systems, which typically help people organizations their Web sites, are typically among the least liked pieces of software. Among other faults, they age poorly, says Michael Fienen at .eduGuru. Mr. Fienen offers some advice for colleges to choose a CMS more intelligently and for CMS vendors to serve as better members of the higher-ed community.

      Question
      What was the first computer-based CMS/LMS system?

      Hint
      It went "hoot."

      In the early days of CMS/LMS software there was no Internet available to the general public. The earliest commercial CMS/LMS software came in boxes of floppy disks. The earliest software was developed with funding for the U.S. military training. It later became available to the public in computer stores. Colleges, however, were long delayed in adopting this software in computing centers. Professors like me of course were experimenting on our own. In the early years I used DOS-based HyperGraphics CMS and later Windows-based Toolbook CMS.

      The history of CMS/LMS systems can be investigated at the following two links:

      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/290wp/290wp.htm

      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/245cont.htm

      By being an early adopter, I was invited to hundreds of campuses to demonstrate CMS software ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/Resume.htm#Presentations
      Now I'm a has-been with tons of old floppy disks and old CDs!

    • Robert E Jensen

      Bookkeeping Tutorials and Accounting Research for the Developing World Cooperatives

      Last week I generated an AECM message about accounting academic career development in which I mentioned the need for accounting educators and researchers to develop more niche tutorials and niche research much like natural scientists and social scientists for years have been developing niche specialties.

      As an illustration, I can't recall stumbling upon anything in the academic accounting literature regarding bookkeeping tutorials and research in the developing world cooperative  (in truth, however, I've never done an extensive search on this topic). For example, there are some books and research papers on farm accounting and taxation, but these are focused mainly on farming in North America.

      I did stumble upon the following ACDI-VOCA site of resources for the developing world in general ---
      http://www.acdivoca.org/

      Mission

      To promote economic opportunities for cooperatives, enterprises and communities through the innovative application of sound business practice.

      ACDI/VOCA Values

      ACDI/VOCA strives to promote positive economic and social change worldwide. It is distinguished by commitment to its overseas beneficiaries, wise stewardship of development resources and a knowledgeable, experienced, diverse and effective team.

      Commitment to Beneficiaries

      ACDI/VOCA is dedicated to poverty alleviation and broad-based economic growth. Our respect for host societies and our commitment to the involvement of beneficiaries as true partners in development projects result in improved local capacities, enhanced opportunities, and vibrant, sustainable communities, cooperatives and enterprises. ACDI/VOCA's business model of development is designed to increase incomes and wealth, permitting beneficiaries to fully participate in the global economy.

      Stewardship of Development Resources

      High-quality work and strict standards of accountability characterize ACDI/VOCA’s programs. We take pride in being a technical leader, but with a human focus. Projects are based on a clear focus on development goals, proven approaches and a results-orientation. ACDI/VOCA adopts for its own management the same enlightened business tools and techniques that we promote abroad. To maximize the effective use of public resources and sustainable impact, we favor expandable, replicable methods, local ownership, an emphasis on broad-based participation and alliances with the private sector and other partners.

      Qualified, Empowered and Diverse Staff

      ACDI/VOCA’s effectiveness depends largely on the quality of its staff. Our organization values communication, teamwork and enlightened leadership. We believe in fair hiring and promotion practices, which contribute to a healthy diversity. We are committed to the empowerment of all employees and to a rewarding quality of life in the workplace. We emphasize technical proficiency, staff development and a participative culture. To learn more,
      click
      here.

      Jensen Comment
      I did a search on "accounting" and got 45 hits at the ACDI-VOCA site.
      I did a search on "bookkeeping" and got 4 hits.

      My point is that for accounting professors who are finding it difficult to find a niche for accounting tutorial development (training), research, and publication, this developing world niche is certainly a great opportunity to investigate.

    • Robert E Jensen

      "Popular Pearson Tutoring Programs Revamp by Offering ‘Adaptive Learning’," by Josh Fischman, Chronicle of Higher Education, November 1, 2011 ---
      http://chronicle.com/blogs/wiredcampus/popular-pearson-tutoring-programs-revamp-by-offering-adaptive-learning/33970?sid=wc&utm_source=wc&utm_medium=en

      MyLabs and Mastering, tutoring software packages from Pearson Education that are used in hundreds of college courses, are getting their guts ripped out and replaced.

      The company announced today that it was replacing its own software with new adaptive-learning programs that adjust the course to the student. The new software, from a company called Knewton, has interactive tutors that lead students through mastery of each skill, giving short quizzes and offering additional help, such as explanatory text or videos, tailored to each student’s needs. In large classes, students get such help—or can skip concepts they know well—without asking the instructor to intervene. And instructors get constant feedback on how particular students are doing compared to the rest of the class, or even similar classes at other institutions.

      Pearson provides the content, and Knewton’s program will control how it is delivered. (Instructors have the ability to set their own priorities and add their own material.) The two companies plan to begin beta testing this fall and to have programs ready for the fall semester of 2012.

      Instructors greeted the news with a mix of enthusiasm and concern that changes would harm a product that they already like. “I’ve been very pleased with MyWritingLab,” said David A. Webster, coordinator of development education at Marion Technical College, in Ohio. “I hope they don’t break it!”

      He teaches a course called “Preparation for College Writing” and says his students do much better after working with the software. But he also said that Knewton’s ability to customize help choices sounded like a real improvement over the existing product.

      Gary S. Buckley, a professor of physical sciences at Cameron University, in Oklahoma, uses Pearson’s Mastering Chemistry and Mastering Physics in introductory courses, and said that “now the software doesn’t really pay attention to the individual student. Everyone gets the same problems. So this sounds like a good change.”

      Continued in article


      Learning Management System (LMS) --- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Learning_management_system

      "Freeing the LMS," by Steve Kolowich, Inside Higher Ed, October 13, 2011 ---
      http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2011/10/13/pearson_announces_free_learning_management_system

      Last year, the media conglomerate Pearson controlled a shade over 1 percent of the market for learning management systems (LMS) among traditional colleges, according to the Campus Computing Project.

      This year, Pearson is taking aim at the other 99 percent.

      In a move that could shake the e-learning industry, the company today unveiled a new learning management system that colleges will be able to use for free, without having to pay any of the licensing or maintenance costs normally associated with the technology.

      Pearson’s new platform, called OpenClass, is only in beta phase; the company does not expect to take over the LMS market overnight. But by moving to turn the learning management platform into a free commodity — like campus e-mail has become for many institutions — Pearson is striking at the foundation of an industry that currently bills colleges for hundreds of millions per year.

      “I think that the announcement really marks another, and important, nail in the coffin of the proprietary last-generation learning management system,” says Lev Gonick, CIO of Case Western Reserve University.

      By providing complimentary customer support and cloud-based hosting, OpenClass purports to underprice even the nominally free open-source platforms that recently have been gaining ground in the LMS market. Hundreds of colleges have defected from Blackboard -- whose full-service, proprietary platform has ruled the market for more than a decade -- in favor of open-source alternatives that cost nothing to license. But while the source code for these systems is free, colleges have had to pay developers to modify the code and keep the system stable.

      OpenClass can be used “absolutely for free,” says Adrian Sannier, senior vice president of product at Pearson. “No licensing costs, no costs for maintenance, and no costs for hosting. So this is a freehttp://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/290wp/290wp.htm r offer than Moodle is. It’s a freer offer than any other in the space.”

      Outflanking the Market

      Pearson, which sells a variety of higher-education products and services, including textbooks, e-tutoring software and online courseware, has had success selling its own proprietary learning management system, LearningStudio (formerly known as eCollege), to for-profit colleges. But the company has made fewer inroads with the much larger nonprofit sector. With OpenClass, Sannier says Pearson is taking aim at “traditional institutions around the country where professors are the ones making the decisions about what’s happening in their classrooms” — a demographic that has long been Blackboard’s stronghold.

      “Our intention is to serve every corner of that instructor-choice marketplace,” says Sannier.

      Pearson says it is taking a strategic cue from Google, which offers its cloud-based e-mail and applications suite to colleges for free in an effort to secure “mind share” among the students and professors who use it. Like Google with its Apps for Education — with which Pearson has partnered for its beta launch — the media conglomerate is hoping to use OpenClass as a loss leader that points students and professors toward those products that the company’s higher ed division sees as the future of its bottom line: e-textbooks, e-tutoring software, and other “digital content” products.

      Continued in article

      Bob Jensen's threads on the history of Learning Management Systems (also called Course Management Systems) ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/290wp/290wp.htm

       

    • Robert E Jensen

      "Popular Pearson Tutoring Programs Revamp by Offering ‘Adaptive Learning’," by Josh Fischman, Chronicle of Higher Education, November 1, 2011 ---
      http://chronicle.com/blogs/wiredcampus/popular-pearson-tutoring-programs-revamp-by-offering-adaptive-learning/33970?sid=wc&utm_source=wc&utm_medium=en

      MyLabs and Mastering, tutoring software packages from Pearson Education that are used in hundreds of college courses, are getting their guts ripped out and replaced.

      The company announced today that it was replacing its own software with new adaptive-learning programs that adjust the course to the student. The new software, from a company called Knewton, has interactive tutors that lead students through mastery of each skill, giving short quizzes and offering additional help, such as explanatory text or videos, tailored to each student’s needs. In large classes, students get such help—or can skip concepts they know well—without asking the instructor to intervene. And instructors get constant feedback on how particular students are doing compared to the rest of the class, or even similar classes at other institutions.

      Pearson provides the content, and Knewton’s program will control how it is delivered. (Instructors have the ability to set their own priorities and add their own material.) The two companies plan to begin beta testing this fall and to have programs ready for the fall semester of 2012.

      Instructors greeted the news with a mix of enthusiasm and concern that changes would harm a product that they already like. “I’ve been very pleased with MyWritingLab,” said David A. Webster, coordinator of development education at Marion Technical College, in Ohio. “I hope they don’t break it!”

      He teaches a course called “Preparation for College Writing” and says his students do much better after working with the software. But he also said that Knewton’s ability to customize help choices sounded like a real improvement over the existing product.

      Gary S. Buckley, a professor of physical sciences at Cameron University, in Oklahoma, uses Pearson’s Mastering Chemistry and Mastering Physics in introductory courses, and said that “now the software doesn’t really pay attention to the individual student. Everyone gets the same problems. So this sounds like a good change.”

      Continued in article


      Learning Management System (LMS) --- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Learning_management_system

      "Freeing the LMS," by Steve Kolowich, Inside Higher Ed, October 13, 2011 ---
      http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2011/10/13/pearson_announces_free_learning_management_system

      Last year, the media conglomerate Pearson controlled a shade over 1 percent of the market for learning management systems (LMS) among traditional colleges, according to the Campus Computing Project.

      This year, Pearson is taking aim at the other 99 percent.

      In a move that could shake the e-learning industry, the company today unveiled a new learning management system that colleges will be able to use for free, without having to pay any of the licensing or maintenance costs normally associated with the technology.

      Pearson’s new platform, called OpenClass, is only in beta phase; the company does not expect to take over the LMS market overnight. But by moving to turn the learning management platform into a free commodity — like campus e-mail has become for many institutions — Pearson is striking at the foundation of an industry that currently bills colleges for hundreds of millions per year.

      “I think that the announcement really marks another, and important, nail in the coffin of the proprietary last-generation learning management system,” says Lev Gonick, CIO of Case Western Reserve University.

      By providing complimentary customer support and cloud-based hosting, OpenClass purports to underprice even the nominally free open-source platforms that recently have been gaining ground in the LMS market. Hundreds of colleges have defected from Blackboard -- whose full-service, proprietary platform has ruled the market for more than a decade -- in favor of open-source alternatives that cost nothing to license. But while the source code for these systems is free, colleges have had to pay developers to modify the code and keep the system stable.

      OpenClass can be used “absolutely for free,” says Adrian Sannier, senior vice president of product at Pearson. “No licensing costs, no costs for maintenance, and no costs for hosting. So this is a freehttp://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/290wp/290wp.htm r offer than Moodle is. It’s a freer offer than any other in the space.”

      Outflanking the Market

      Pearson, which sells a variety of higher-education products and services, including textbooks, e-tutoring software and online courseware, has had success selling its own proprietary learning management system, LearningStudio (formerly known as eCollege), to for-profit colleges. But the company has made fewer inroads with the much larger nonprofit sector. With OpenClass, Sannier says Pearson is taking aim at “traditional institutions around the country where professors are the ones making the decisions about what’s happening in their classrooms” — a demographic that has long been Blackboard’s stronghold.

      “Our intention is to serve every corner of that instructor-choice marketplace,” says Sannier.

      Pearson says it is taking a strategic cue from Google, which offers its cloud-based e-mail and applications suite to colleges for free in an effort to secure “mind share” among the students and professors who use it. Like Google with its Apps for Education — with which Pearson has partnered for its beta launch — the media conglomerate is hoping to use OpenClass as a loss leader that points students and professors toward those products that the company’s higher ed division sees as the future of its bottom line: e-textbooks, e-tutoring software, and other “digital content” products.

      Continued in article

      Bob Jensen's threads on the history of Learning Management Systems (also called Course Management Systems) ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/290wp/290wp.htm