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    The Effect of Partner Communications of Fraud Likelihood and...
    research summary posted June 22, 2017 by Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips, tagged 06.08 SAS No. 99 Brainstorming – effectiveness, 08.04 Auditors’ Professional Skepticism, 09.10 Prior Dispositions/Biases/Auditor state of mind 
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    Title:
    The Effect of Partner Communications of Fraud Likelihood and Skeptical Orientation on Auditors’ Professional Skepticism
    Practical Implications:

    Based on previous studies and preconceived notions, the finding that partners expressing their own views about the low likelihood of fraud had no effect on professional skepticism was surprising. This suggest that partner’s concern of not expressing this opinion to the team because it would lower the overall professional skepticism may be unwarranted. The evidence from this study indicates that partners can raise professional skepticism within the team by communicating management’s view of low likelihood of fraud, however it is not recommended for partners to use this approach every single time. Also, encouraging both outward and internal skeptical orientation can raise professional skepticism as well.

    Citation:

    Harding, N, and K. T. Trotman. 2017. The Effect of Partner Communications of Fraud Likelihood and Skeptical Orientation on Auditors’ Professional Skepticism. Auditing, A Journal of Practice and Theory 36 (21): 111-131.

    Keywords:
    Professional skepticism; fraud; partner communication; inward versus outward orientation; trait skepticism
    Purpose of the Study:

    Professional skepticism is a key attribute for auditors, and as such firms have been exploring ways to enhance professional skepticism within audit teams. This study investigates the impact of partner communications, specifically partner attribution and skeptical orientation, on professional skepticism during fraud brainstorm meetings. Partner attribution refers to the following choices of communication regarding the likelihood of fraud:

    • Own view there is a low probability of fraud
    • Management’s view there is a low probability of fraud
    • Not making any view known

     

    The partner can also encourage different types of skeptical orientation. The two addressed in this paper are:

    • The traditional view of outward skepticism which focuses on the veracity of management representations.
    • Inward skepticism which focuses on the accuracy of one’s own judgments as an auditor.
    Design/Method/ Approach:

    Participants in the two studies were comprised of 88 managers and seniors from the Big 4 firms. The first study examined the effects that partner attribution had on professional skepticism. Alternatively, the second study examined the effectiveness of encouraging outward versus internal skeptical orientation. The analysis included a 2x2+1 design for each of the two judgments.

    Findings:

    The authors find the following related to partner attribution:

    • There are increased levels of professional skepticism in situations where the partner communicates management’s view of a low probability of fraud. The authors believe this may be the result of auditor’s trying to find evidence that contradicts management’s view.
    • There are no significant changes in skeptical skepticism in situations where the partner communicates his/her own view of a low probability of fraud or no view at all.

     

    The authors find the following related to skeptical orientation:

    • There is no advantage in encouraging either an outward versus internal skeptical orientation. Neither is more effective than the other in elevating professional skepticism.
    • However, encouraging outward and internal skeptical orientation together can increase the level of professional skepticism.
    Category:
    Auditing Procedures - Nature - Timing and Extent, Auditor Judgment, Risk & Risk Management - Including Fraud Risk
    Sub-category:
    Auditors’ Professional Skepticism, Prior Dispositions/Biases/Auditor state of mind, SAS No. 99 Brainstorming – effectiveness
    Home:

    http://commons.aaahq.org/groups/e5075f0eec/summary