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    The Effect of Alternative Types of Review on Auditors’ P...
    research summary posted May 2, 2012 by The Auditing Section, last edited May 25, 2012, tagged 09.0 Auditor Judgment, 09.02 Documentation Specificity, 09.11 Auditor judgment in the workpaper review process, 11.0 Audit Quality and Quality Control, 11.06 Working Paper Review – Conduct, Biases and Predispositions 
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    Title:
    The Effect of Alternative Types of Review on Auditors’ Procedures and Performance
    Practical Implications:

    The results of this study are important for audit firms to consider when designing their audit review process.  Though the initial reason for using interactive review was to increase efficiency and enhance training, the results of this study show that the use of interactive review can potentially increase audit effectiveness.  The anticipation of an interactive review enhanced auditors’ efforts toward more cognitively demanding, conclusion-oriented audit procedures.  At the same time, the type of review anticipated had no effect on the performance of the mechanical steps in the audit program (both groups performed well in the mechanical, documentation-oriented audit steps).

    Citation:

    Payne, E. A., R. J. Ramsay, and E. M. Bamber. 2010.  The Effect of Alternative Types of Review on Auditors’ Procedures and Performance.  Auditing: A Journal of Practice & Theory 29 (1): 207-220.

    Keywords:
    audit review process; review formats; interactive review; written review; auditor judgment
    Purpose of the Study:

    Audit review is a primary means of audit quality control and auditor training.  Given the significant amount of total audit hours allocated to review, audit firms are constantly examining ways to increase both the effectiveness and the efficiency of review.  Traditionally, reviewers examine documentation, prepare written review comments, and then either meet with the preparer face-to-face or provide the written notes to the preparer to be addressed.  An alternative approach that has gained in popularity is a real-time interactive review.  In this type of review, reviewers do not prepare written review notes prior to the review.  Instead, the reviewer sits down with the preparer and the review is done face-to-face with the file reviewer.  The interaction generates the written comments for the preparer to follow-up rather than written comments being prepared in advance.  Given the unique features of an interactive review, the purpose of this study is to examine how preparers’ anticipation of this type of review (as compared to a review with written notes) affects their performance of audit procedures and, in turn, audit effectiveness.  Specifically, the study examines the following:

    • Whether auditors anticipating an interactive review will more thoroughly perform the more cognitively demanding, conclusion-oriented steps of an audit program than auditors anticipating receipt of written review notes.
    • Whether auditors anticipating an interactive review will perform the more mechanical, documentation-oriented steps of the audit program differently than auditors anticipating receipt of written reviewnotes.
    • If performance on the conclusion-oriented steps of an audit program is positively related to conceptual error identification.
    • If performance on the documentation-oriented steps of an audit program is positively related to mechanical error detection.
    Design/Method/ Approach:

    The research evidence is collected prior to November 2008.  The authors use a group of staff- and senior-level auditors from three international accounting firms to complete a simulated audit task involving completing a test of internal controls for write-offs of accounts receivable.  Half of the participants were told they would receive written review notes and half of the participants were told they would be asked to meet face-to-face with a manager in an interview format to discuss/review the participant’s work. 
    All participants then performed mechanical, documentation-oriented procedures, conceptual, conclusion-oriented procedures, prepared a summary memo, and performed test of controls.  Completion of the procedures would allow them to identify two misstatements in the audit support and one fraud red flag.

    Findings:
    • Auditors anticipating an interactive review performed a more thorough examination of the audit evidence in the conceptual, conclusion-oriented audit steps than auditors anticipating a written review notes.
    • Auditors anticipating both types of reviews performed similarly in the mechanical, documentation-oriented audit steps.
    • A more thorough review of the audit evidence in the demanding, conclusion-oriented steps of an audit program is positively associated with (1) the identification of the fraud red flag (as predicted) and (2) detections of mechanical errors (not predicted).  To clarify, auditors who performed better in the conclusion steps of an audit program were more likely to identify the fraud red flag and the misstatements.
    • Performance of the mechanical, documentation-oriented audit steps is positively associated with detections of mechanical errors.  To clarify, auditors who performed better in the documentation steps of an audit program were more likely to identify the misstatements.
    Category:
    Auditor Judgment, Audit Quality & Quality Control
    Sub-category:
    Documentation Specificity, Auditor judgment in the workpaper review process, Working Paper Review – Conduct - Biases & Predispositions
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