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    Audit Reporting for Going-Concern Uncertainty: A Research...
    research summary posted October 20, 2014 by Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips, last edited April 1, 2015, tagged 09.0 Auditor Judgment, 09.04 Going Concern Decisions, 12.0 Accountants’ Reports and Reporting, 12.01 Going Concern Decisions 
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    Title:
    Audit Reporting for Going-Concern Uncertainty: A Research Synthesis
    Practical Implications:

    This study provides a summary of the literature examining the auditor’s GCO decisions. Determinants of GCOs include client factors (e.g. size, level of financial stress, financial reporting quality, corporate governance), auditor factors (e.g. audit firm size), auditor-client relationships (e.g. auditor switching and the issue of opinion shopping) and environmental factors (e.g. changes in regulations, auditing standards and audit market structure). Important findings are that auditors will change the likelihood of issuing GCOs in response to changes in the environment (whether due to changes in regulation or changes in the economy) and that the majority of companies that receive GCOs do not subsequently file for bankruptcy.

    For more information on this study, please contact Elizabeth Carson.

    Citation:

    Carson, E., N. L. Fargher, M. A. Geiger, C. S. Lennox, K. Raghunandan, and M. Willekens. 2013. Audit reporting for going-concern uncertainty: A research synthesis. Auditing: A Journal of Practice & Theory 32 (Supp): 353-384.

    Keywords:
    going-concern; audit reporting; bankruptcy
    Purpose of the Study:

    The global financial crisis in 2007 has resulted in an increased incidence of company failures. This led to renewed interest from regulators, standard setters and investors in the auditor’s assessment and reporting on a company’s ability to continue as a going concern. In order to facilitate the understanding of the role and effectiveness of independent audit, this study conducts a comprehensive review to synthesize and discuss the extant academic literature on auditors’ decisions to issue a modified opinion based on going concern uncertainty (hereafter, GCO).

    Design/Method/ Approach:

    This study synthesizes major findings from audit research since the 1970s. Most of the research reviewed is archival; however, a few studies using experimental designs are also cited. A framework is developed to structure the categorization of the extant GCO literature. Three main themes are identified: (1) Determinants of GCOs, (2) Accuracy of GCOs, and (3) Consequences of GCOs. This study also provides a discussion on issues related to research methodology and identifies areas for further research.

    Findings:

    Under the category of “Determinant of GCOs”, the synthesis shows that:

    • Auditors are more likely to issue GCOs after December 2001, which is in response to the accounting and auditing scandals in early 2000s (e.g. collapse of Enron). Also, smaller companies more likely to receive GCOs.
    • In the ten-year period between 2000 and 2010, 60.10% of bankruptcy filings are preceded by GCOs.
    • Determinants of GCOs include: (1) client factors (e.g. size, level of financial stress, financial reporting quality, corporate governance), (2) auditor factors (e.g. audit firm size), (3) auditor-client relationships (e.g. auditor switching and the issue of opinion shopping) and (4) environmental factors (e.g. changes in regulations, auditing standards and audit market structure).

    Under the category of “Accuracy of GCOs”, the synthesis shows that:

    • Since the adoption of SAS No.59, 40-50% of bankruptcy firms did not receive a prior GCO.
    • 80-90% of companies receiving a GCO do not file for bankruptcy in the subsequent year.

    Under the category of “Consequences of GCOs”, the synthesis shows that:

    • Issuance of GCOs is associated with negative excess returns, and the reaction is more negative when problems with obtaining financing are cited.
    • In the U.S., the issuance of GCO can be a “self-fulfilling prophecy” and cause the financial demise of company that would have survived if it had not received a GCO.

    With regards to issues in research methods, this study cautions the use of small samples in analysis and the interpretation of interaction variables in the statistical models. The study also finds general limitations in extant research due to the varying sample selection criteria for identifying financial stressed firms and the exclusion of private companies from samples examined.

    This study suggests further research could (1) examine the relations between auditor independence and GCO decisions, (2) investigate auditor’s GCO decisions and the related issues for financial institutions, non-profit organisations and government entities, (3) replicate research on GCO accuracy in different time periods with different samples, (4) examine the information usefulness of GCOs to a wide set of market participants, and (5) properly distinguish between the roles of management, audit committee and auditor in the disclosure and discussion of going-concern. 

    Category:
    Accountants' Reporting, Auditor Judgment
    Sub-category:
    Going Concern Decisions, Going Concern Decisions