News About Colleagues

from the news room

This is a public Custom Hive  public

memorial

    Frederick D.S. Choi
    memorial posted October 17, 2012 by Deirdre Harris, tagged 2012, memorial 
    758 Views
    colleague's name:
    Frederick D.S. Choi
    photo:
    photo description:
    Frederick D. S. Choi
    memorial:

    It is with deep sadness that the NYU Stern community mourns the loss of Frederick D.S. Choi, Dean Emeritus of the Undergraduate College and a senior member of the Accounting Department. Fred was beloved by students, respected by faculty and cherished by the entire Stern community.  He touched the lives of individual  students and colleagues and his influence on our curriculum and culture will reverberate for generations to come.  Fred¹s passion for students, teaching and scholarship were matched only by his love for his "sweetheart," Lois, his wife of 50 years, his sons, Scott and Aaron, his granddaughters, Marisa and Alexa, and his daughter-in-law Michele.

    Fred joined the faculty in 1981 and made a number of important contributions.  From 1995-2004, he served as Dean of the Undergraduate College.  During his deanship, Fred implemented a new undergraduate curriculum with a focus on the liberal arts, critical thinking, social responsibility, leadership, and global business.  He also introduced several programs that remain hallmarks of the Undergraduate College today, including: the Barr Family International Studies Program in which every junior travels abroad to learn first-hand about differences in cultures and ways of conducting business; the Senior-year Honors Program that involves students in faculty research; and the Cohen Arts and Culture Experience which gives all students a systematic introduction to the arts and culture of New York City.

    Fred was also a star as a teacher and scholar.  He was the Distinguished Service Professor of Business and served as Chairman of the Department of Accounting, Taxation, and Business Law and Director of Stern¹s Vincent C. Ross Institute of Accounting Research. He wrote award-winning books and published articles in journals such as The Journal of Accounting Research, The Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, The Financial Analysts Journal, The Journal of Accountancy, and The Journal of International Business Studies.  Fred was invited to lecture at a wide range of institutions around the world and served as a member of the First American Visiting Team to establish the National Center for Industrial Science and Technology Management Development in the People¹s Republic of China. He taught thousands of executives the essentials of international reporting and analysis in Europe, Latin America, Asia and the U.S., most notably on Wall Street.

    Fred was a recipient of the Citibank Excellence in Teaching Award, a recipient of the American Accounting Association¹s Outstanding International Accounting Educator Award and was the first academician appointed to the Board of Trustees of the Financial Executives Research Foundation. Fred was also a member of the American  Accounting Association, the Academy of International Business, Financial Executives Institute, Phi Kappa Phi, Beta Gamma Sigma and Beta Alpha Psi.  He was the founding editor of The Journal of International Financial Management and Accounting.

    In 2010-2011, Fred served as Interim Dean of the Undergraduate College. During that year I experienced first-hand the wonderful qualities that endeared Fred to legions of students and colleagues.  As our weekly meetings evolved into tutorials in which Fred generously shared of his wisdom and experience, I came to understand just why he was so beloved.

    And as much as I valued Fred¹s guidance, it is his kindness and friendship that resonate with me most deeply, even as I write this message.  Halfway through our year together, Fred gave me a silver NYU Torch, and I have worn it on my lapel ever since.  Scholar, leader, teacher, friend, husband, father, and grandfather we will miss this marvelous man, but Fred Choi¹s legacy burns brightly for all to see.

    --Peter Henry