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ELS session

    Nazik S Roufaiel
    Open Learning Enhances Communication and Research Skills
    ELS session posted August 9, 2011 by Nazik S Roufaiel, last edited April 27, 2012 
    2963 Views, 15 Comments
    title:
    Open Learning Enhances Communication and Research Skills
    names(s), affiliation(s):
    State University of New York - Empire State College - Center for Distance Learning
    date:
    August 10, 2011 9:45am - 11:00am
    comments:
    This is an online course, yet the same pedagogical techniques are used in a hybrid/blended course. Pedagogy focuses on the importance of using Internet resources, electronic search tools, Open learning and Educational Resources [OER] to enhance and enrich self-learning of various accounting courses especially at the introductory level. The course design integrates the social media network to enhance communication, collaboration, and research skills.

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    • Robert E Jensen

      Stanford Opens Seven New Online Courses for Enrollment (Free) --- Click Here
      http://www.openculture.com/2011/11/seven_new_stanford_courses.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+OpenCulture+%28Open+Culture%29

      Starting in January and February 2012, Stanford will offer seven new courses, and they’re all open for enrollment today. Here’s the new list (and don’t forget to browse through our collection of 400 Free Online Courses):

      Computer Science 101
      Software Engineering for SaaS
      Human Computer Interfaces
      Natural Language Processing
      Game Theory
      Probabilistic Graphical Models

      Related Content:

      Create iPhone/iPad Apps in iOS 5 with Free Stanford Course

      Bob Jensen's threads on free courses, video lectures, and course materials from prestigious universities ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/000aaa/updateee.htm#OKI

      Bob Jensen's many links to free learning materials in various academic disciplines ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/Bookbob2.htm

       

    • Robert E Jensen

      Open Sharing Tool Library and Networking for Multiple Nations
      "OpenScout supports the collaborative reuse and adaptation of Portuguese and Brazilian OER," by Alexander Mikroyannidis, The Financial Education Daily, November 16, 2011 ---
      http://paper.li/businessschools?utm_source=subscription&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=paper_sub

      The OpenScout Tool Library is a social network of individuals and collectives who are developing or using learning resources and want to share their stories and resources from different countries.

      The OpenScout Tool Library is currently hosting the activities of the COLEARN community of research in collaborative learning and educational technologies in the Portuguese language. This group is run by Alexandra Okada (The Open University UK) and consists of learners, educators and researchers from academic institutions in Brazil, Portugal and Spain. Their interests focus on collaborative participation through social media, colearning (collaborative open learning) using Open Educational Resources (OER), Social Media and Web 2.0 research. There are 26 research groups from Brazilian and Portugal universities - 115 people currently registered in the Tool Library.

      At the moment, this community is developing a book project called "Web 2.0: Open Educational Resources in Learning and Professional Development". From January to February 2012, three workshops will be run in the Tool Library for improving OER skills: image, presentation and audio/visual material. These collaborative activities and workshops aim at engaging people in developing their skills and discussing concepts as well as preparing themselves to be OER users who are able to produce, remix and share open resources and open ideas.

       


      Related Links:

      Bob Jensen's threads on tools and tricks of the trade ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/000aaa/thetools.htm

      Bob Jensen's threads on open sharing ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/000aaa/updateee.htm#OKI

    • Robert E Jensen

      "MIT Expands 'Open' Courses, Adds Completion Certificates," Inside Higher Ed, December 19, 2011 ---
      http://www.insidehighered.com/quicktakes/2011/12/19/mit-expands-open-courses-adds-completion-certificates

      The Massachusetts Institute of Technology -- which pioneered the idea of making course materials free online -- today announced a major expansion of the idea, with the creation of MITx, which will provide for interaction among students, assessment and the awarding of certificates of completion to students who have no connection to MIT.

      MIT is also starting a major initiative -- led by Provost L. Rafael Reif -- to study online teaching and learning.

      The first course through MITx is expected this spring. While the institute will not charge for the courses, it will charge what it calls "a modest fee" for the assessment that would lead to a credential. The credential will be awarded by MITx and will not constitute MIT credit. The university also plans to continue MIT OpenCourseWare, the program through which it makes course materials available online.

      An FAQ from MIT offers more details on the new program.

      While MIT has been widely praised for OpenCourseWare, much of the attention in the last year from the "open" educational movement has shifted to programs like the Khan Academy (through which there is direct instruction provided, if not yet assessment) and an initiative at Stanford University that makes courses available -- courses for which some German universities are providing academic credit. The new initiative would appear to provide some of the features (instruction such as offered by Khan, and certification that some are creating for the Stanford courses) that have been lacking in OpenCourseWare.

      Video:  Open Education for an Open World
      45-minute Video from the Long-Time President of MIT --- http://18.9.60.136/video/816

      Bob Jensen's threads on open-share courses, lectures, videos, and course materials from prestigious universities ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/000aaa/updateee.htm#OKI

    • Robert E Jensen

      "So you want to learn to program?" by Robert Talbert, Chronicle of Higher Education, January 16, 2012 ---
      http://chronicle.com/blognetwork/castingoutnines/2012/01/16/so-you-want-to-learn-to-program/?sid=wc&utm_source=wc&utm_medium=en

      Jensen Comment
      Having taught both Fortran and COBOL at one point in my career, I will pass on this opportunity to upgrade my programming skills. However, these sound like valuable free resources for the younger generation headed for college or that generation of unemployable history majors seeking new skills.

      Bob Jensen's threads on Tools and Tricks of the Trade are at
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/000aaa/thetools.htm

    • Robert E Jensen

      "MIT’s New Free Courses May Threaten (and Improve) the Traditional Model, Program’s Leader Says," by Jeffrey R. Young, Chronicle of Higher Education, February 6, 2012 --- Click Here
      http://chronicle.com/blogs/wiredcampus/mits-new-free-courses-may-threaten-the-traditional-model-programs-leader-says/35245?sid=wc&utm_source=wc&utm_medium=en

      The recent announcement that Massachusetts Institute of Technology would give certificates around free online course materials has fueled further debate about whether employers may soon welcome new kinds of low-cost credentials. Questions remain about how MIT’s new service will work, and what it means for traditional college programs.

      On Monday The Chronicle posed some of those questions to two leaders of the new project: L. Rafael Reif, MIT’s provost, and Anant Agarwal, director of MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. They stressed that the new project, called MITx, will be run separately from the institute’s longstanding effort to put materials from its traditional courses online. That project, called OpenCourseWare, will continue just as before, while MITx will focus on creating new courses designed to be delivered entirely online. All MITx materials will be free, but those who want a certificate after passing a series of online tests will have to pay a “modest fee.”

      Q. I understand you held a forum late last month for professors at MIT to ask questions about the MITx effort. What were the hottest questions at that meeting?
       

      Mr. Agarwal: There were a few good questions. One was, How will you offer courses that involve more of a soft touch? More of humanities, where it may not be as clear how to grade answers?

      Mr. Reif: One particular faculty member said, How do I negotiate with my department head to get some time to be doing this? Another one is, Well, you want MIT to give you a certificate, how do we know who the learner is? How do we certify that?

      Q. That is a question I’ve heard on some blogs. How do you know that a person is who they say they are online? What is your answer to that?
       

      Mr. Agarwal: I could give a speech on this question. … In the very short term students will have to pledge an honor code that says that they’ll do the work honestly and things like that. In the medium term our plan is to work with testing companies that offer testing sites around the world, where they can do an identity check and they can also proctor tests and exams for us. For the longer term we have quite a few ideas, and I would say these are in the so-called R&D phase, in terms of how we can electronically check to see if the student is who they say they are, and this would use some combination of face recognition and other forms of technique, and also it could involve various forms of activity recognition.

      Q. You refer to what’s being given by MITx as a certificate. But there’s also this trend of educational badges, such as an effort by Mozilla, the people who make the Firefox Web browser, to build a framework to issue such badges. Is MIT planning to use that badge platform to offer these certificates?
       

      Mr. Agarwal: There are a lot of experiments around the Web as far as various ways of badging and various ways of giving points. Some sites call them “karma points.” Khan Academy has a way of giving badges to students who offer various levels of answering questions and things like that. Clearly this is a movement that is happening in our whole business. And we clearly want to leverage some of these ideas. But fundamentally at the end of the day we have to give a certificate with a grade that says the student took this course and here’s how they did—here’s their grade and we will give it to them. … But there are many, many ways the Internet is evolving to include some kind of badging and point systems, so we will certainly try to leverage these things. And that’s a work in progress.

      Q. So there will be letter grades?

       

      Mr. Agarwal: Correct.

      Q. So you’ve said you will release your learning software for free under an open-source license. Are you already hearing from institutions that are going to take you up on that?
       

      Mr. Agarwal: Yes, I think there’s a lot of interest. Our plan is to make the software available online, and there has been a lot of interest from a lot of sources. Many universities and other school systems have been thinking about making more of their content available online, and if they can find an open platform to go with I think that will be very interesting for a lot of people.

      Q. If you can get this low-cost certificate, could this be an alternative to the $40,000-plus per year tuition of MIT for enough people that this will really shake up higher education? That may not threaten MIT, but could it threaten and even force some colleges to close if they have to compete with a nearly free certificate from your online institution?
       

      Mr. Reif: First of all this is not a degree, this is a certificate that MITx is providing. The second important point is it’s a completely different educational environment. The real question is, What do employers want? I think that for a while MITx or activities like MITx—and there is quite a bit of buzz going on around things like that—will augment the education students get in college today. It’s not intended to replace it. But of course one can think of, “What if in a few years, I only take two MITx-like courses for free and that’s enough to get me a job?” Well, let’s see how well all this is received and how well or how badly the traditional college model gets threatened.

      In my personal view, I think the best education that can be provided is that in a college environment. There are many things that you cannot teach very well online. Let me give you, for instance, an example of something that is important: ethics and integrity and things like that. You walk on the MIT campus and by taking a course with Anant Agarwal and meeting him and other professors like him you get the sense of ethics and integrity. Is it easy to transfer that online in a community? Maybe it is, but it’s going to take a bit of research to figure out how to do that.

      Continued in article

      The Game Changer
      More on Porsches versus Volkswagens versus Competency Based Learning
      Bringing Low Cost Education and Training to the Masses
      Both a 1950 VW bug and a 1950 Porsche can be driven from Munich to Berlin. A Porsche (MIT degree) can make the trip faster, more comfortable (the VW didn't even have a heater), and safer on the autobahn.  But the VW can achieve the same goal at a lower cost to own and drive.

      As fate would have it, the day after I wrote about Hitler's Volkswagen versus Porsche analogy with meeting higher education needs of the masses at very low cost, the following article appeared the next day of February 3. Ryan Craig and I went about make the same point from two different angles.

      Part of my February 2, 2012 message read as follows:

      . . .

      But the MITx design is not yet a Volkswagen since MIT provides high quality lectures, videos, and course materials without yet setting academic standards. MIT is instead passing along the academic standard setting to the stakeholders. For example, when an engineering student at Texas A&M graduates with a 3.96 grade average, the Texas A&M system has designed and implemented the academic quality controls. In the MITx certificate program, the quality controls must be designed by the employers or graduate school admissions officers not part of the Texas A&M system..

      My earlier example is that a student in the MITx program may learn a great deal about Bessel functions --- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bessel_functions 
      But obtaining a MITx certificate for completing a Bessel function module says absolutely nothing about whether the certificate holder really mastered Bessel functions. It's up to employers and graduate school admissions officers to introduce filters to test the certificate holder's mastery of the subject.

      I hope that one day the MITx program will also have competency-based testing of its MITx certificate holders --- that would be the second stage of a free MITx Volkswagen model.

      Bob Jensen

      For all the hubbub about massive online classes offered by elite universities, the real potential game-changer in higher education is competency-based learning.
      Ryan Craig. February 3, 2012

      "Adventures in Wonderland, by Ryan Craig, Inside Higher Ed, February 3, 2012 ---
      http://www.insidehighered.com/views/2012/02/03/essay-massive-online-courses-not-game-changing-innovation

      "Will MITx Disrupt Higher Education?" by Robert Talbert, Chronicle of Higher Education, December 20, 2011 ---
      http://chronicle.com/blognetwork/castingoutnines/2011/12/20/will-mitx-disrupt-higher-education/?sid=wc&utm_source=wc&utm_medium=en

      "MIT Expands 'Open' Courses, Adds Completion Certificates," Inside Higher Ed, December 19, 2011 ---
      http://www.insidehighered.com/quicktakes/2011/12/19/mit-expands-open-courses-adds-completion-certificates

      "MIT’s New Free Courses May Threaten (and Improve) the Traditional Model, Program’s Leader Says," by Jeffrey R. Young, Chronicle of Higher Education, February 6, 2012 --- Click Here
      http://chronicle.com/blogs/wiredcampus/mits-new-free-courses-may-threaten-the-traditional-model-programs-leader-says/35245?sid=wc&utm_source=wc&utm_medium=en

       

      Bob Jensen's threads on open source video and course materials from prestigious universities ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/000aaa/updateee.htm#OKI

      Bob Jensen's threads on education technology in general ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/000aaa/0000start.htm

      THE COLLEGE OF 2020: STUDENTS  ---
      https://www.chronicle-store.com/Store/ProductDetails.aspx?CO=CQ&ID=76319&PK=N1S1009

      Bob Jensen's threads on higher education controversies ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/HigherEdControversies.htm

      Bob Jensen's threads on online training and education alternatives ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/Crossborder.htm

       

       

       

    • Robert E Jensen

      MITx Opens Enrollment for First Interactive Online Course; For a Time MITx Certificates Will Be Free --- Click Here
      http://chronicle.com/blogs/wiredcampus/mitx-opens-enrollment-for-first-interactive-online-course-pilot-certificates-will-be-free/35396?sid=wc&utm_source=wc&utm_medium=en

      Jensen Comment
      The bad news is that MITx Certificates are in no way equivalent to MIT course credits. The good news is that there is open admission, free course video and other materials used in on-campus courses, and some prestige associated MIT's sponsorship of the MITx Certificate program. The MITx is an outreach program to students who really want to put the time and effort into learning on their own from outstanding materials provided by MIT. Only a small percentage of MITx students around the world may actually master the tough learning materials, but their numbers may dominate.

      The first prototype MITx course is “6.002x: Circuits and Electronics." If only a small percentage of MITx Certificate recipients superbly master this course, it could well be far more students than the total number of on-campus students who superbly master this course this term.

      Bob Jensen's threads on the MITx Certificate program ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/000aaa/updateee.htm#OKI

    • Robert E Jensen

      Because of the six-month time limits these are not like eBooks that you can purchase for a lifetime
      Harvard Business Review's Online Self-Paced Learning Programs in Accounting --- Click Here
      http://hbr.org/product/financial-accounting-online-course-introductory-se/an/4001HB-HTM-ENG?referral=00563&cm_mmc=email-_-newsletter-_-daily_alert-_-alert_date&utm_source=newsletter_daily_alert&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=alert_date

      The Harvard Business School has not been as generous as MIT's Sloan School in open sharing free learning materials ---
      http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/#sloan-school-of-management

      MIT's Open Sharing Courses in General ---
      http://ocw.mit.edu/index.htm

      MITx Opens Enrollment for First Interactive Online Course; For a Time MITx Certificates Will Be Free --- Click Here
      http://chronicle.com/blogs/wiredcampus/mitx-opens-enrollment-for-first-interactive-online-course-pilot-certificates-will-be-free/35396?sid=wc&utm_source=wc&utm_medium=en

      Jensen Comment
      The bad news is that MITx Certificates are in no way equivalent to MIT course credits. The good news is that there is open admission, free course video and other materials used in on-campus courses, and some prestige associated MIT's sponsorship of the MITx Certificate program. The MITx is an outreach program to students who really want to put the time and effort into learning on their own from outstanding materials provided by MIT. Only a small percentage of MITx students around the world may actually master the tough learning materials, but their numbers may dominate.

      The first prototype MITx course is “6.002x: Circuits and Electronics." If only a small percentage of MITx Certificate recipients superbly master this course, it could well be far more students than the total number of on-campus students who superbly master this course this term.

      "Will MITx Disrupt Higher Education?" by Robert Talbert, Chronicle of Higher Education, December 20, 2011 ---
      http://chronicle.com/blognetwork/castingoutnines/2011/12/20/will-mitx-disrupt-higher-education/?sid=wc&utm_source=wc&utm_medium=en

      Bob Jensen's threads on the MITx Certificate program ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/000aaa/updateee.htm#OKI

       

    • Robert E Jensen

      Harvard Presents Free Courses with the Open Learning Initiative --- Click Here
      http://www.openculture.com/2010/08/harvard_presents_free_courses_with_its_open_learning_initiative.html

      Bob Jensen's threads on free courses, course certificates, lecture videos, and course materials from prestigious universities ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/000aaa/updateee.htm#OKI
       

    • Robert E Jensen

      The Always-Popular Open Sharing Salmon Khan
      "An Outsider Calls for a Teaching Revolution," by Jeffrey R. Young, Chronicle of Higher Education, February 26, 2012 ---
      http://chronicle.com/article/An-Outsider-Calls-for-a/130923/?sid=wc&utm_source=wc&utm_medium=en

      In just a few short years, Salman Khan has built a free online educational institution from scratch that has nudged major universities to offer free self-guided courses and inspired many professors to change their teaching methods.

      His creation is called Khan Academy, and its core is a library of thousands of 10-minute educational videos, most of them created by Mr. Khan himself. The format is simple but feels intimate: Mr. Khan's voice narrates as viewers watch him sketch out his thoughts on a digital whiteboard. He made the first videos for faraway cousins who asked for tutoring help. Encouraging feedback by others who watched the videos on YouTube led him to start the academy as a nonprofit.

      More recently Mr. Khan has begun adding what amounts to a robot tutor to the site that can quiz visitors on their knowledge and point them to either remedial video lessons if they fail or more-advanced video lessons if they pass. The site issues badges and online "challenge patches" that students can put on their Web résumés.

      He guesses that the demand for his service was one inspiration for his alma mater, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, to start MITx, its self-guided online courses that give students the option of taking automatically graded tests to earn a certificate.

      Mr. Khan also works the speaking circuit, calling on professors to move away from a straight lecture model by assigning prerecorded lectures as homework and using class time for more interactive exercises, or by having students use self-paced computer systems like Khan Academy during class while professors are available to answer questions. "It has made universities—and I can cite examples of this—say, Why should we be giving 300-person lectures anymore?" he said in a recent interview with The Chronicle.

      Mr. Khan, now 35, has no formal training in education, though he does have two undergraduate degrees and a master's from MIT, as well as an M.B.A. from Harvard. He spent most of his career as a hedge-fund analyst. Mr. Khan also has the personal endorsement of Bill Gates, as well as major financial support from Mr. Gates's foundation. That outside-the-academy status makes some traditional academics cool on his project.

      "Sometimes I get a little frustrated when people say, Oh, they're taking a Silicon Valley approach to education. I'm like, Yes, that's exactly right. Silicon Valley is where the most creativity, the most open-ended, the most pushing the envelope is happening," he says. "And Silicon Valley recognizes more than any part of the world that we're having trouble finding students capable of doing that."

       

      Khan Academy Home Page --- http://www.khanacademy.org/
      This site lists the course categories (none for accounting)

      2,300+ YouTube Free Educational Videos from Salman Khan
      "Salman Khan: The Messiah of Math:  Can an ex-hedge fund guy and his nonprofit Khan Academy make American school kids competitive again?" by Bryant Urstadt, Business Week, May 19, 2011 ---
       http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/11_22/b4230072816925.htm?link_position=link3

      In August 2004, Salman Khan agreed to help his niece, Nadia, with her math homework. Nadia was headed into seventh grade in New Orleans, where Khan had grown up, but she hadn't been placed in her private school's advanced math track, which to a motivated parent these days is a little bit like hearing your child has just been diagnosed with Lou Gehrig's disease. In particular, Nadia was having trouble with unit conversion, turning gallons into liters and ounces into grams.

      Math was something Khan, then 28, understood. It was one of his majors at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, along with computer science and electrical engineering. He had gone on to get a master's in computer science and electrical engineering, also at MIT, and then an MBA from Harvard. He was working in Boston at the time for Daniel Wohl, who ran a hedge fund called Wohl Capital Management. Khan, an analyst, was the only employee.

      Being a bit of a geek, Khan put Yahoo!'s (YHOO) Messenger to work to help Nadia, using the Doodle function to let him illustrate concepts for his niece as they spoke on the phone. Then he wrote some code that generated problems she could do on a website. With Khan's help, Nadia made it into the fast track, and her younger brothers Arman and Ali signed on for Khan's tutoring as well. Then they brought in some of their friends. Khan built his site out a little more, grouping the concepts into "modules" and creating a database that would keep track of how many problems the kids had tried and how they had fared, so he'd know how each of his charges was progressing.

      Messenger didn't make sense with multiple viewers, so he started creating videos that he could upload to YouTube. This required a Wacom tablet with an electronic pen, which cost about $80. The videos were each about 10 minutes long and contained two elements: his blackboard-style diagrams—Khan happens to be an excellent sketcher—and his voice-over explaining things like greatest common divisors and equivalent fractions. He posted the first video on Nov. 16, 2006; in it, he explained the basics of least common multiples. Soon other students, not all children, were checking out his videos, then watching them all, then sending him notes telling him that he had saved their math careers, too.

      Less than five years later, Khan's sideline has turned into more than just his profession. He's now a quasi-religious figure in a country desperate for a math Moses. His free website, dubbed the Khan Academy, may well be the most popular educational site in the world. Last month about 2 million students visited. MIT's OpenCourseWare site, by comparison, has been around since 2001 and averages 1 million visits each month. He has posted more than 2,300 videos, beginning with simple addition and going all the way to subjects such as Green's theorem, normally found in a college calculus syllabus. He's adding videos on accounting, the credit crisis, the French Revolution, and the SAT and GMAT, among other things. He masters the subjects himself and then teaches them. As of the end of April, he claims to have served up more than 54 million individual lessons.

      His program has also spread from the homes of online learners to classrooms around the world, to the point that, in at least a few classrooms, it has supplanted textbooks. (Students often write Khan that they aced a course without opening their texts, though Khan doesn't post these notes on his site.) Dan Meyer, a high school math teacher and Stanford University PhD candidate in education, puts it this way: "If you're teaching math in this country right now, then there's pretty much no way you haven't heard of Salman Khan."

      Continued in article

      "Video: Salman Khan @ Google 'Free World Class Virtual School(s)'," Simoleon Sense, March 28, 2011 ---
      http://www.simoleonsense.com/video-salman-khan-google-free-world-class-virtual-schools/

      Salman Khan is the founder and faculty of Khan Academy http://www.khanacademy.org/ a not-for-profit educational organization. With the stated mission “of providing a high quality education to anyone, anywhere”, the Academy supplies a free online collection of over 2,000 videos on mathematics, history, finance, physics, chemistry, astronomy, and economics.

      In late 2004, Khan began tutoring his cousin in mathematics using Yahoo!’s Doodle notepad. When other relatives and friends sought his tutorial, he decided it would be more practical to distribute the tutorials on YouTube. Their popularity there and the testimonials of appreciative students prompted Khan to quit his job in finance in 2009 and focus on the Academy full-time.

      Khan Academy’s channel on YouTube http://www.youtube.com/user/khanacademy has 45+ million views so far and it’s one of YouTube’s most successful academic partners.

      In September 2010, Google announced they would be providing the Khan Academy with $2 million to support the creation of more courses and to enable the Khan Academy to translate their core library into the world’s most widely spoken languages, as part of Project 10^100, http://www.project10tothe100.com/.

      Continued in article

      Bob Jensen's threads on open sharing tutorials and videos ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/000aaa/updateee.htm#OKI

       

       

       

    • Robert E Jensen

      Five Free Courses from Stanford Start This Month --- Click Here
      http://www.openculture.com/2012/03/5_free_courses_from_stanford_start_this_month.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+OpenCulture+%28Open+Culture%29

      Stanford’s big open course initiative keeps rolling along. On March 12, three new courses will get underway:

      Then, starting on March 19, two more will take flight:

      The courses generally feature interactive video clips; short quizzes that provide instant feedback; the ability to pose high value questions to Stanford instructors; feedback on your overall performance in the class; and a statement of accomplishment at the end of the course.

      And, yes, the courses are free and now open for enrollment.

      As always, don’t miss our big list of 425 Free Online Courses. It may just be the single most awesome page on the web.

      Story via Stanford University News. Algorithm image courtesy of BigStock.

      Bob Jensen's threads on the MITx Certificates and other free courses, lectures, and learning materials from prestigious universities ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/000aaa/updateee.htm#OKI

       

    • Robert E Jensen

      Khan Academy --- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Khan_Academy
      Khan Academy Home Page --- http://www.khanacademy.org/

      On March 11, 2012 CBS Sixty Minutes broadcast a great module on the Khan Academy ---
      Khan Academy: The future of education?  Click Here
      http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-18560_162-57394905/khan-academy-the-future-of-education/?tag=contentMain;cbsCarousel
       

      With the backing of Gates and Google, Khan Academy and its free online educational videos are moving into the classroom and across the world. Their goal: to revolutionize how we teach and learn. Sanjay Gupta reports. Web Extras

      Khan Academy: The future of education? Khan Academy: School of the future Khan Academy in the classroom More »

      (CBS News) Sal Khan is a math, science, and history teacher to millions of students, yet none have ever seen his face. Khan is the voice and brains behind Khan Academy, a free online tutoring site that may have gotten your kid out of an algebra bind with its educational how-to videos. Now Khan Academy is going global. Backed by Google, Gates, and other Internet powerhouses, Sal Khan wants to change education worldwide, and his approach is already being tested in some American schools. Sanjay Gupta reports.

      The following script is from "Teacher to the World" which aired on March 11, 2012. Sanjay Gupta is the correspondent. Denise Schrier Cetta, producer. Matthew Danowski, editor.

      Take a moment and remember your favorite teacher - now imagine that teacher could reach, not 30 kids in a classroom, but millions of students all over the world. That's exactly what Sal Khan is doing on his website Khan Academy. With its digital lessons and simple exercises, he's determined to transform how we learn at every level. One of his most famous pupils, Bill Gates, says Khan -- this "teacher to the world," is giving us all a glimpse of the future of education.

      35-year-old Sal Khan may look like a bicycle messenger, but with three degrees from MIT and an MBA from Harvard, his errand is intensely intellectual. In his tiny office above a tea shop in Silicon Valley, he settles in to do what he's done thousands of times before.

       

      [Sal Khan: We've talked a lot now about the demand curve and consumer surplus. Now let's think about the supply curve.]

       

      He's recording a 10-minute economics lesson. It's so simple - all you hear is his voice and all you see is his colorful sketches on a digital blackboard.

      Watch Internet phenomenon Sal Khan's video lessons

      [Khan: In this video we are going to talk about the law of demand.]

       

      When Khan finishes the lecture, he uploads it to his website - where it joins the more than 3,000 other lessons he's done. In just a couple of years he's gone from having a few hundred pupils to more than four million every month.

       

      Sanjay Gupta: Has it sunk in to you that you are probably the most watched teacher in the world now?

       

      Khan: I, you know, I try not to say things like that to myself. You don't want to think about it too much because it can I think paralyze you a little bit.

       

      [Khan: So if we get rid of the percent sign, we move the decimal over...]

       

      He's amassed a library of math lectures...

       

      [Khan: 12 plus four is sixteen...]

       

      Starting with basic addition and building all the way through advanced calculus.

       

      [Khan: We are taking limited delta x approach to zero. It's the exact same thing.]

       

      But he's not just a math wiz, he has this uncanny ability to break down even the most complicated subjects, including physics, biology, astronomy, history, medicine.

       

      Gupta: How much reading do you do ahead of time?

       

      Khan: It depends what I'm doing. If I'm doing something that I haven't visited for a long time, you know, since high school I'll go buy five textbooks in it. And I'll try to read every textbook. I'll read whatever I can find on the Internet.

       

      [Khan: Let's talk about one of the most important biological processes...]

      Continued in article

      The Always-Popular Open Sharing Salmon Khan
      "An Outsider Calls for a Teaching Revolution," by Jeffrey R. Young, Chronicle of Higher Education, February 26, 2012 ---
      http://chronicle.com/article/An-Outsider-Calls-for-a/130923/?sid=wc&utm_source=wc&utm_medium=en

      In just a few short years, Salman Khan has built a free online educational institution from scratch that has nudged major universities to offer free self-guided courses and inspired many professors to change their teaching methods.

      His creation is called Khan Academy, and its core is a library of thousands of 10-minute educational videos, most of them created by Mr. Khan himself. The format is simple but feels intimate: Mr. Khan's voice narrates as viewers watch him sketch out his thoughts on a digital whiteboard. He made the first videos for faraway cousins who asked for tutoring help. Encouraging feedback by others who watched the videos on YouTube led him to start the academy as a nonprofit.

      More recently Mr. Khan has begun adding what amounts to a robot tutor to the site that can quiz visitors on their knowledge and point them to either remedial video lessons if they fail or more-advanced video lessons if they pass. The site issues badges and online "challenge patches" that students can put on their Web résumés.

      He guesses that the demand for his service was one inspiration for his alma mater, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, to start MITx, its self-guided online courses that give students the option of taking automatically graded tests to earn a certificate.

      Mr. Khan also works the speaking circuit, calling on professors to move away from a straight lecture model by assigning prerecorded lectures as homework and using class time for more interactive exercises, or by having students use self-paced computer systems like Khan Academy during class while professors are available to answer questions. "It has made universities—and I can cite examples of this—say, Why should we be giving 300-person lectures anymore?" he said in a recent interview with The Chronicle.

      Mr. Khan, now 35, has no formal training in education, though he does have two undergraduate degrees and a master's from MIT, as well as an M.B.A. from Harvard. He spent most of his career as a hedge-fund analyst. Mr. Khan also has the personal endorsement of Bill Gates, as well as major financial support from Mr. Gates's foundation. That outside-the-academy status makes some traditional academics cool on his project.

      "Sometimes I get a little frustrated when people say, Oh, they're taking a Silicon Valley approach to education. I'm like, Yes, that's exactly right. Silicon Valley is where the most creativity, the most open-ended, the most pushing the envelope is happening," he says. "And Silicon Valley recognizes more than any part of the world that we're having trouble finding students capable of doing that."

       

      Jensen Comment
      Important takeaways from the Sixty Minutes video is that there are currently 40-50 million users of Khan Academy. This has to be the future of learning technical modules, although inspiration, learning motivation, and learning certification (e.g., grades) must have other sources. I might note that the video modules used in the Khan Academy are very similar to the Camtasia Videos that I prepared to teach technical details to my students in accounting theory and AIS ---
      http://www.cs.trinity.edu/~rjensen/video/acct5342/
      These videos may not run on Windows 7 machines because of something bad that happened with Windows 7 ---
      http://www.cs.trinity.edu/~rjensen/video/VideoCodecProblems.htm

      The $50 million grant from the Gates Foundation enabled the Khan Academy to hire some sophisticated engineers who, among other things, have written software for tracking learning progress of users.

      The most wonderful feature of the technical learning modules at the Khan Academy is that there are thousands of them and they are all free. Students aged 10-100 can learn a vast amount of technical things if they are inspired and motivated to do so for learning's sake. They are great supplements for courses being taken for grades and transcripts. But they still only cover selected disciplines in math, science, technology, and social science. The coverage is still lacking in fields like accounting, law, and business except where quantitative methods like statistical analysis may come into play. But the Khan Academy is not finished adding new modules by any means.

      I might add that I found some relatively advanced-level accountancy modules at the Khan Academy such as CDO accounting and fair value accounting. But the Khan Academy still does not come close to covering what we teach in accountancy, auditing, tax and AIS relative what is taught in a mathematics curriculum.

      I suspect it may one day become a little like YouTube where experts will add video modules to Khan Academy. However, the postings to Khan Academy will no doubt be subjected to quality control filters.

      This is the wave of technical learning in the future. Video modules will not, however, replace the importance of team learning, studies of complicated cases that do not have definitive solutions (e.g., Harvard Business School Cases), and interactions with faculty and students that inspire and motivate students to want to learn more and more and more.

      Lastly, I want to note that I don't see any way possible not to love Sal Khan. He's an inspiration to the world.

      Saylor.org: Free Education --- http://www.saylor.org/

      Khan Academy Home Page --- http://www.khanacademy.org/

      Free lectures, videos, courses, and certificate credit from prestigious universities (including MITx) ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/000aaa/updateee.htm#OKI

    • Robert E Jensen

      "At Yale, Online Lectures Become Lively Books," by Jennifer Howard, Chronicle of Higher Education, April 26, 2012 ---
      http://chronicle.com/blogs/wiredcampus/at-yale-online-lectures-become-lively-books/36162?sid=wc&utm_source=wc&utm_medium=en

      The Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Stanford University, and other institutions are old hands now at taking course material from the classroom and lab and putting it online for learners anywhere to use. Yale University may be the first to reverse the process, using its Open Yale Courses as the basis for an old-fashioned book series.

      This month, Yale University Press released the first batch of paperbacks based on lecture courses featured in the online-learning program. Priced at $18 and available in e-format too, the books are meant to expand the audience for the course material even further, according to Diana E.E. Kleiner. A professor of art history and classics at Yale, Ms. Kleiner is the founding project director of Open Yale Courses.

      “It may seem counterintuitive for a digital project to move into books and e-books, because these are a much more conventional way of publishing,” she says. But the Open Yale Courses are about “reaching out in every way that we could.” That includes posting audio and video versions online (via Yale’s Web site, YouTube, and iTunes), and providing transcripts and now book versions of the lectures.

      Having transcripts of their lectures to work with gives faculty authors a jump-start. “It was incomparably the easiest book I have ever written,” says Shelly Kagan, a Yale professor of philosophy whose lecture course on death has become one of the Open Yale program’s most popular offerings. “I just started with the transcripts and treated that as a first draft.” The book that resulted, also called Death, has already been reviewed in the Wall Street Journal.

      Other books have taken him 10 years, Mr. Kagan says. This one took only a few months. Talk to him in detail about the process, though, and it’s clear he put a lot of fresh labor into the project, in addition to the years of work that went into creating the lectures in the first place.

      Even very good lectures contain grammatical mistakes, jokes or asides, or physical cues that don’t work on the page, and other unfelicities that might distract or annoy a reader. Mr. Kagan polished those away and restructured some of the discussion so that it followed a more logical order. He changed some descriptive details.

      He preserved the freewheeling, more personal style he uses in the lecture hall. “Although I changed the setting, and some of the examples, cleaned up the grammar, moved points around, and so forth and so on, I tried very hard to keep the conversational tone from the lectures,” he says. ” The subject matter is heavy—I am talking about death, after all—but I don’t think we have to discuss it in a ponderous, inaccessible, ‘academic’ fashion.”

      He doubts he would have turned his lectures on death into a book at all without the transcripts and the feedback from people outside Yale “suggesting there’s a hunger for this stuff.” Since his lectures went online, he’s heard from people all over the world. He’s even become a kind of philosopher-guru in China, where volunteers created Mandarin subtitles for his videotaped lectures.

      “I’ve just had the most amazing experiences with it,” he says of his participation in Open Yale. “I get e-mails from people in all walks of life, from literally all corners of the globe.” Some want to engage him in philosophical debate; others share stories about their own grappling with life-and-death issues. In many cases, “people were striking a deeply personal note,” he says. “The whole range of it has been humbling and gratifying.”

      Laura Davulis, associate editor for history and large digital projects at the Yale press, edits the series. Because the authors are so steeped in their material, and because the idea is to preserve the original spirit of the lectures, “I definitely have a lighter hand” in editing, she says. “My role is really more guidance in terms of how to take material that’s spoken and turn it into something that’s appropriate for a reading audience but still has that friendliness and accessibility of sitting in a course and listening to the lecture.”

      The books in the series aren’t peer-reviewed as outside manuscripts would normally be, according to Ms. Davulis, but they’re approved by the press’s acquisitions panel and its faculty committee. Although the series is aimed at readers beyond Yale, it makes for a nice on-campus partnership between Yale’s press and the online-education project. “One of the things we wanted to play up was the Yale connection,” she says.

      Bob Jensen's threads on Tools and Tricks of the Trade ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/000aaa/thetools.htm

      Bob Jensen's threads on free courses, lectures, videos, and course materials from prestigious universities ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/000aaa/updateee.htm#OKI

       

    • Robert E Jensen

      Bob Jensen's Links to Open Sharing Materials, Videos, Tutorials, and Courses in Various Academic Disciplines ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/bookbob2.htm

      Directory of Open Access Journals --- http://doaj.org

      The Journal of Electronic Publishing --- http://www.journalofelectronicpublishing.org/

      VYOM eBooks Directory --- http://www.vyomebooks.com/

      Search for electronic books --- http://www.searchebooks.com/ 
      There were 293 hits for accounting books.

      Bob Jensen's threads on electronic books are at
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/ebooks.htm

      Internet Resources --- http://www.internet-resources.com/writers/wrlinks-wordstuff.htm

       

      Carnegie Mellon Libraries: Digital Library Colloquium (video lectures) --- http://www.library.cmu.edu/Libraries/DLColloquia.html

       

      Free Merriam Webster Online Dictionary/Thesaurus --- http://www.m-w.com/

      Literary Terms --- http://www.tnellen.com/cybereng/lit_terms/index.html

      Literary Criticism --- http://www.ipl.org/div/litcrit/

      “PoemTalk” Podcast, Where Impresario Al Filreis Hosts Lively Chats on Modern Poetry ---
      http://www.openculture.com/2013/02/poemtalk_podcast_where_impresario_al_filreis_hosts_lively_chats_on_modern_poetry.htm

      Internet FAQ Archives --- http://www.faqs.org/faqs/

      JURN (search engine for humanities and social science research) --- http://www.jurn.org/

      Grad Life: McGill University Blogs --- http://blogs.mcgill.ca/gradlife/

      Bob Jensen's threads on listservs, blogs, and the social media ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/ListservRoles.htm

      Also see
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/000aaa/updateee.htm#OKI

    • Robert E Jensen

      Columbia University's Open Syllabus Project Gathers 1,000,000 Syllabi from Universities & Reveals the 100 Most Frequently-Taught Books ---
      http://www.openculture.com/2016/01/the-open-syllabus-project-gathers-1000000-syllabi-from-universities.html

      These are 51/200 hits at at http://explorer.opensyllabusproject.org/  after filtering on "Business"

      1 444 87.4
      Ross, Stephen A.
      2 348 74.5
      Kieso, Donald E.
      3 232 75.9
      Bodie, Zvi
      4 220 58.2
      Garrison, Ray H.
      5 201 48.2
      Ross, Stephen A.
      6 199 88.8
      Kotler, Philip
      7 129 81.9
      Brealey, Richard A.
      8 127 74.8
      Robbins, Stephen P., 1943
      9 126 34.5
      Bodie, Zvi
      10 123 41.0
      Brigham, Eugene F., 1930
      11 96 26.0
      Romney, Marshall B.
      12 96 92.2
      Due, Jean M.
      African Studies Review
      13 94 49.8
      Keller, Gerald
      14 91 59.9
      Case, Frederick E.
      15 90 96.1
      Deitel, Harvey M., 1945
      16 84 32.6
      Malkiel, Burton Gordon
      17 83 24.5
      Horngren, Charles T., 1926
      18 77 100.0
      Strunk, William, 1869-1946
      19 77 27.1
      Brigham, Eugene F., 1930
      20 75 20.3
      Wild, John J.
      21 68 31.8
      Cateora, Philip R.
      22 65 72.5
      Drucker, Peter F. (Peter Ferdinand), 1909-2005
      23 65 60.4
      Collins, James C. (James Charles), 1958
      24 63 19.6
      Berk, Jonathan B., 1962
      25 59 24.1
      Levy, Michael
      26 59 23.9
      Brealey, Richard A.
      27 58 19.4
      Benninga, Simon
      28 58 72.7
      Hull, John, 1946
      29 57 15.5
      Kotler, Philip
      30 56 67.1
      Kotler, Philip
      31 54 17.3
      Libby, Robert
      32 54 13.1
      Winer, Russell S.
      33 47 29.9
      Hill, Charles W. L.
      34 44 18.9
      Eun, Cheol S.
      35 43 19.2
      Reilly, Frank K.
      36 43 15.0
      Higgins, Robert C.
      37 43 38.9
      Hill, Charles W. L.
      38 40 67.6
      Kotter, John P., 1947
      39 40 12.7
      Gitman, Lawrence J.
      40 38 26.9
      Armstrong, Gary
      41 38 9.7
      Brigham, Eugene F., 1930
      42 37 23.4
      Cochrane, John H. (John Howland)
      43 36 84.3
      Fisher, Roger, 1922-2012
      44 36 44.3
      Moore, David S.
      45 35 10.3
      Raabe, William A.
      46 35 24.8
      Perrin, Robert, 1950
      47 35 6.1
      Kerin, Roger A.
      48 35 12.4
      Block, Stanley B.
      49 34 30.6
      Kerr, Steven
      The Academy of Management Executive (1993-2005)
      50 34 41.5
      Grant, Robert M., 1948
      51 34 5.0
      Holden, Craig W.

      Continued up to 200 at http://explorer.opensyllabusproject.org/  after filtering on "Business"

      Bob Jensen's threads on open sharing ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/000aaa/updateee.htm#OKI

       

    • Robert E Jensen

      Kaplan University --- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kaplan_University

      After being essentially "given away" by Jeff Bezo's Washington Post, the former Kaplan University is now named Purdue Global University ---
      https://www.chronicle.com/article/Offspring-of-Purdue-s/242213?cid=wcontentlist_hp_latest&elqTrackId=770cf49d644648389c4d60f584981a5b&elq=ec436abaed344d3f9ca010248f72e80e&elqaid=17423&elqat=1&elqCampaignId=7621

      The offspring of Purdue University’s purchase of Kaplan University has been christened Purdue University Global. In a news release, Purdue said the name would become official if the regional accreditor, the Higher Learning Commission, approves the deal.

      That review is scheduled for February 22, according to the news release. The Indiana Commission for Higher Education and the U.S. Department of Education have already signed off on the deal.

      “Our campuses are typically named after the physical locations where they hold classes. Purdue University Global can be accessed from anywhere in the world, at any time,” said Purdue's president, Mitch Daniels. “The name proved appealing and meaningful to our various stakeholders – most importantly prospective students.”

      The new name omits mention of Kaplan University, which currently serves 29,000 students online and in person in Iowa, Indiana, Nebraska, Maryland, Maine, Missouri, and Wisconsin.

      Betty Vandenbosch, president of Kaplan University, would become chancellor of Purdue University Global.

      “The name is respectful of Purdue’s exceptional reputation, but also distinct from Purdue’s other campuses,” she said.

      Purdue’s decision to buy the for-profit university has stirred debate since news of it broke in April. Faculty members and students questioned the public university’s motives, with one equating the deal to selling the university’s brand to Wall Street. Others have raised concerns that Kaplan would retain control over the institutions it currently has while receiving a facelift from the Purdue brand.

      Jensen Comment
      Roughly speaking, Purdue University had 30,000 undergraduate and 10,000 graduate students before taking on Kaplan's 29,000 students. This makes the acquisition of Kaplan University a pretty big deal for Purdue and greatly changes its outreach mission. Online universities typically have much lower admission standards than flagship state universities. It will be interesting to see how Purdue maintains traditionally high admission standards and graduation standards. in its new Purdue Global University. My guess is that the 29,000 figure will shrink for degree-seeking graduates, but nobody knows by how much at this juncture.

      Many of the PGU students may become non-traditional students seeking technical badges/certificates rather than transcript credits. That may become typical in many of our flagship universities as employers seek greater specialization skills of new employees, often technical skills not being taught in flagship universities at the moment. For example, until now employers would not recruit on flagship university campuses for accountants specialized in cross-currency swap accounting or accountants trained in derivative financial instrument valuations using Bloomberg terminal yield curves. That could change as badges and certificates become increasingly popular.

      Bob Jensen's threads on learning seekers apart from degree seekers ---
      http://faculty.trinity.edu/rjensen/000aaa/updateee.htm#OKI