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    James Serocki
    Tax Careers
    discussion posted September 15, 2010 by James Serocki, last edited April 8, 2012 
    7460 Views, 34 Comments
    discussion:
    Tax Careers
    details:

    I would be interested in participating in a discussion in how best to provide business students (likely accounting majors) sufficient timely information to properly consider a tax career. It appears the recruiting process (e.g. for internships), primarily by CPA firms, comes early in a student's academic process usually junior status, often before any tax courses are taken. Therefore, most students being recruited, have only educational exposure to accounting through their course work and defer to a selection of assurance. As an academic (former practitioner) teaching taxation in a business school, my concern is that some changes need to be made in order to provide accounting majors a balanced exposure to all aspects of a career in accounting, including taxation.  This change process should be a collaborative effort by academia and potential employers (e.g. CPA firms, industry, government). 

    Comment

    • Bruce K Behn

      James,

      Thanks for taking the time to post your comment.  I would hope a discussion on this would take place--any thoughts?

      Bruce

    • Tracie Nobles

      In my bachelors degree at Texas A&M University, I was able to take individual taxation before the recruiting season. This made a significant impact on my decision to pursue taxation as my career. I think that it is important that students be introduced to taxation early on in their academic program.

    • Robert E Jensen

      Accounting Careers are Hot at Rank 2 According to College Board
      "Hottest Careers for College Graduates:  Experts Predict Where the Jobs Will Be in 2018," College Board, December 30, 2010 ---
      http://www.collegeboard.com/student/csearch/majors_careers/236.html

      Government economists estimate which occupations will have the most job openings between 2008 and 2018. Openings occur because new jobs are created and because workers retire or leave the field for other reasons.

      Check out these top 10 lists of occupations, sorted by the level of education typically required:

       

      Occupations with the Most Job Openings: Graduate Degree


       
      Occupation Total Job Openings 2008–2018
      Postsecondary teachers 553,000
      Doctors and surgeons 261,000
      Lawyers 240,000
      Clergy 218,000
      Pharmacists 106,000
      Educational, vocational, and school counselors 94,000
      Physical therapists 79,000
      Medical scientists, except epidemiologists 66,000
      Mental health and substance abuse social workers 61,000
      Instructional coordinators 61,000

       

      Occupations with the Most Job Openings: Bachelor's Degree


       
      Occupation Total Job Openings 2008–2018
      Elementary school teachers, except special education 597,000
      Accountants and auditors 498,000
      Secondary school teachers, except special and vocational education 412,000
      Middle school teachers, except special and vocational education 251,000
      Computer systems analysts 223,000
      Computer software engineers, applications 218,000
      Network systems and data communications analysts 208,000
      Computer software engineers, systems software 153,000
      Construction managers 138,000
      Market research analysts 137,000

       

      Occupations with the Most Jobs Openings:  Associate's Degree or Postsecondary Vocational Award


       
      Occupation Total Job Openings 2008–2018
      Registered nurses 1,039,000
      Nursing aides, orderlies, and attendants 422,000
      Licensed practical and licensed vocational nurses 391,000
      Computer support specialists 235,000
      Hairdressers, hairstylists, and cosmetologists 220,000
      Automotive service technicians and mechanics 182,000
      Preschool teachers, except special education 178,000
      Insurance sales agents 153,000
      Heating, air conditioning, and refrigeration technicians 136,000
      Real estate sales agents 128,000

      Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

      Bob Jensen's threads on careers are at
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/Bookbob1.htm#careers

    • Robert E Jensen

      Question
      What's the most fun when you're on the road Tom Selling (even if your not exactly a "tax man")?

      Answer Choices

      1. The billings
      2. The expense reimbursements
      3. The tax deductions
      4. The difference between the amounts in Answers 2 and 3 above

      "A Tax Man Takes Account Of His Life CPA Lives Better, Works Less Thanks to Art of Deduction," by Laura Saunders, The Wall Street Journal, April 5, 2011 ---
      http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703696704576222590253291266.html?mod=WSJ_PersonalFinance_PF4

      In the thick of tax season, most certified public accountants are chained to their desks grinding out returns.

      Doug Stives, a CPA from Red Bank, N.J., went skiing in Utah.

      "I always dreamed of coming here for peak conditions," he said in mid-March between runs at Snowbasin Resort.

      The trip is among the many perks that have accrued from his decision, in 2006, to become, in effect, The Most Tax-Efficient Man in America. The experiment has led to a new career, frequent travel and obsessive documentation of expenses, such as a $6 hot dog he recently bought in the Philadelphia airport.

      The "aha" moment came to him, he says, after a college approached him about a teaching gig and he realized he could put into practice many of the tax strategies he had learned over the decades.

      Step One was to change jobs. Mr. Stives had been a partner for 36 years at The Curchin Group, an accounting firm. By accepting an offer to teach tax and accounting courses full-time at the Leon Hess Business School of Monmouth University in New Jersey, he was able to tap into a broad array of tax-free employee benefits not available to him at the firm.

      Step Two was the formation of Doug Stives LLC, the separate consulting business to which he attributes an impressive array of expenses. In general, people who are employees and have side businesses are often in the best position to maximize the tax code's benefits, say experts. Mr. Stives calls this "the best of all worlds."

      The result, says Mr. Stives, is that while he earns less than 75% of his earlier pay, he takes home almost 90% as much. And he says he reaps another $40,000 a year in tax-free benefits from his college gig. Among other things, the school adds to his 401(k) contribution and provides tax-free, discounted health plans for Mr. Stives and his wife, plus disability insurance. As a partner in the accounting firm, he had to fund such expenses himself.

      Not that all is perfect now. One peeve: dealing with what he calls "airline nonsense"—long lines, rising fees and canceled flights. But overall, he says, "my quality of life is so much higher."

      His wife of 40 years, Elizabeth Stives, agrees. "We travel so much now for his business," she says. "Next is Lake Tahoe."

      Continued in article

      Jensen Comment
      Tom is probably not the best person to ask about this since I don't think he takes his wife on most of his many trips. However, back when I was consulting and/or making presentations all over the U.S., Canada, Mexico, Europe, sometimes New Zealand and Asia I typically took my wife along for our expense-paid and/or tax-deductable holidays ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/Resume.htm#Presentations

      I think I enjoyed these "holidays" more because they were tax deductible or they earned me a profit after expenses. I don't recall many away-from home adventures that were strictly out-of-pocket.

    • Robert E Jensen

      His wife is even for sale and marked down at that!
      From The Wall Street Journal Accounting Weekly Review on April 8, 2011

      A Tax Man Takes Account of His Life
      by: Laura Saunders
      Apr 05, 2011
      Click here to view the full article on WSJ.com
       

      TOPICS: Accounting Education, Personal Taxation, Public Accounting, Tax Accounting, Tax Laws, Tax Planning, Taxation

      SUMMARY: The article describes the lifestyle of Doug Stives, a CPA from Red Bank, NJ, who now can enjoy peak skiing season conditions out west after leaving his job as a partner at accounting firm The Curchin Group. His full-time position is now an accounting professor at Monmouth University in New Jersey. All of his accounting and tax practice work is now done as a self-employed contractor reporting on Schedule C.

      CLASSROOM APPLICATION: The article is useful for a tax class discussing deductions , particularly on Schedule C, and for any class covering professional accounting work plans.

      QUESTIONS: 
      1. (Advanced) What type of income is reported on Schedule C as attached to U.S. Form 1040?

      2. (Introductory) How did Mr. Stives's move from being a partner at an accounting firm to a position as an accounting professor and director of the MBA program at Monmouth University allow him to change reporting of his income on his U.S. Form 1040? Be specific.

      3. (Introductory) How did that change in income reporting also change the deductibility of Mr. Stives's travel and other expenses?

      4. (Advanced) How could the IRS challenge deductibility of Mr. Stives's travel expenses? Be specific in your description of the theory behind the potential issue.

      5. (Advanced) Could you replicate Mr. Stives's approach immediately after college graduation? Explain your answer.

      Reviewed By: Judy Beckman, University of Rhode Island

      "A Tax Man Takes Account of His Life," by: Laura Saunders, The Wall Street Journal, April 5. 2011 ---
      http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703696704576222590253291266.html?mod=djem_jiewr_AC_domainid

      In the thick of tax season, most certified public accountants are chained to their desks grinding out returns.

      Doug Stives, a CPA from Red Bank, N.J., went skiing in Utah.

      "I always dreamed of coming here for peak conditions," he said in mid-March between runs at Snowbasin Resort.

      The trip is among the many perks that have accrued from his decision, in 2006, to become, in effect, The Most Tax-Efficient Man in America. The experiment has led to a new career, frequent travel and obsessive documentation of expenses, such as a $6 hot dog he recently bought in the Philadelphia airport.

      The "aha" moment came to him, he says, after a college approached him about a teaching gig and he realized he could put into practice many of the tax strategies he had learned over the decades.

      Step One was to change jobs. Mr. Stives had been a partner for 36 years at The Curchin Group, an accounting firm. By accepting an offer to teach tax and accounting courses full-time at the Leon Hess Business School of Monmouth University in New Jersey, he was able to tap into a broad array of tax-free employee benefits not available to him at the firm.

      Step Two was the formation of Doug Stives LLC, the separate consulting business to which he attributes an impressive array of expenses. In general, people who are employees and have side businesses are often in the best position to maximize the tax code's benefits, say experts. Mr. Stives calls this "the best of all worlds."

      The result, says Mr. Stives, is that while he earns less than 75% of his earlier pay, he takes home almost 90% as much. And he says he reaps another $40,000 a year in tax-free benefits from his college gig. Among other things, the school adds to his 401(k) contribution and provides tax-free, discounted health plans for Mr. Stives and his wife, plus disability insurance. As a partner in the accounting firm, he had to fund such expenses himself.

      Not that all is perfect now. One peeve: dealing with what he calls "airline nonsense"—long lines, rising fees and canceled flights. But overall, he says, "my quality of life is so much higher."

      His wife of 40 years, Elizabeth Stives, agrees. "We travel so much now for his business," she says. "Next is Lake Tahoe."

      Mr. Stives, 64 years old, says he's too miserly to focus solely on maximizing deductions—a practice he calls a "rookie's mistake." In 2010, for example, he spotted a bonanza in "bonus depreciation" for large SUVs used in a business, but didn't need another car. "Sometimes my cheapness overcomes my love of tax savings," he says. "My wife will tell you I got her on sale."

      Instead, he says, he uses the tax code's many quirks as the means through which he can live a fuller life.

      Continued in article

      Bob Jensen's threads on accountancy careers are at
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/BookBob1.htm#careers


      Question
      What's the most fun when you're on the road Tom Selling (even if your not exactly a "tax man")?

      Answer Choices

      1. The billings
      2. The expense reimbursements
      3. The tax deductions
      4. The difference between the amounts in Answers 2 and 3 above

      "A Tax Man Takes Account Of His Life CPA Lives Better, Works Less Thanks to Art of Deduction," by Laura Saunders, The Wall Street Journal, April 5, 2011 ---
      http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703696704576222590253291266.html?mod=WSJ_PersonalFinance_PF4

      In the thick of tax season, most certified public accountants are chained to their desks grinding out returns.

      Doug Stives, a CPA from Red Bank, N.J., went skiing in Utah.

      "I always dreamed of coming here for peak conditions," he said in mid-March between runs at Snowbasin Resort.

      The trip is among the many perks that have accrued from his decision, in 2006, to become, in effect, The Most Tax-Efficient Man in America. The experiment has led to a new career, frequent travel and obsessive documentation of expenses, such as a $6 hot dog he recently bought in the Philadelphia airport.

      The "aha" moment came to him, he says, after a college approached him about a teaching gig and he realized he could put into practice many of the tax strategies he had learned over the decades.

      Step One was to change jobs. Mr. Stives had been a partner for 36 years at The Curchin Group, an accounting firm. By accepting an offer to teach tax and accounting courses full-time at the Leon Hess Business School of Monmouth University in New Jersey, he was able to tap into a broad array of tax-free employee benefits not available to him at the firm.

      Step Two was the formation of Doug Stives LLC, the separate consulting business to which he attributes an impressive array of expenses. In general, people who are employees and have side businesses are often in the best position to maximize the tax code's benefits, say experts. Mr. Stives calls this "the best of all worlds."

      The result, says Mr. Stives, is that while he earns less than 75% of his earlier pay, he takes home almost 90% as much. And he says he reaps another $40,000 a year in tax-free benefits from his college gig. Among other things, the school adds to his 401(k) contribution and provides tax-free, discounted health plans for Mr. Stives and his wife, plus disability insurance. As a partner in the accounting firm, he had to fund such expenses himself.

      Not that all is perfect now. One peeve: dealing with what he calls "airline nonsense"—long lines, rising fees and canceled flights. But overall, he says, "my quality of life is so much higher."

      His wife of 40 years, Elizabeth Stives, agrees. "We travel so much now for his business," she says. "Next is Lake Tahoe."

      Continued in article

      Jensen Comment
      Tom is probably not the best person to ask about this since I don't think he takes his wife on most of his many trips. However, back when I was consulting and/or making presentations all over the U.S., Canada, Mexico, Europe, sometimes New Zealand and Asia I typically took my wife along for our expense-paid and/or tax-deductable holidays ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/Resume.htm#Presentations

      I think I enjoyed these "holidays" more because they were tax deductible or they earned me a profit after expenses. I don't recall many away-from home adventures that were strictly out-of-pocket.

    • Robert E Jensen

      "Say Anything: The Big Four Defense Of Overtime Exemptions," by Francine McKenna, re:TheAuditors, June 20, 2011 ---
      http://retheauditors.com/2011/06/20/say-anything-the-big-4-defense-of-overtime-exemptions/

      "PricewaterhouseCoopers Headed For A Trial In California Overtime Case." by Francine McKenna, re:TheAuditors, June 17, 2011 ---
      http://retheauditors.com/2011/06/17/pricewaterhousecoopers-headed-for-a-trial-in-california-overtime-case/

      Jensen Comment
      Francine discusses strategies used by large auditing firms to avoid paying overtime, often in conflict with both state laws and auditing standards. CPA firms are not unique in seeking out ways to avoid overtime pay laws. Similar ploys are taken by hospitals and medical clinics paying residents and universities paying adjunct faculty and graduate students.

      Bob Jensen's threads on accountancy careers are at
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/BookBob1.htm#careers

    • Robert E Jensen

      Question
      What goes screaming down the highway with a long tail?

      Answer
      An ambulance being chased by hundreds of lawyers.

      Especially note the chart in the following article
      "Tamanaha: The Coming Crunch for Law Schools," by Paul Caron, Tax Prof Blog, June 29, 2011 ---
      http://taxprof.typepad.com/

      Following up on yesterday's post, NY Times -- The Lawyer Surplus, State by StateThe Coming Crunch for Law Schools, by Brian Tamanaha (Washington U.):

      The New York Times released a chart yesterday showing that law schools are churning out far more lawyers than the number of available legal positions. That is old news, of course. What's worse is that the oversupply promises to continue. ... Law schools now pump out about 45,000 graduates annually at a time when the Bureau of Labor Statistics projects about 28,000 new lawyer positions per year.

      Why are law schools enrolling so many students when employment prospects for graduates are so poor? Because they must. In the past two decades law faculties have gotten bigger. AALS tallied 7,421 full time faculty in 1990, and 10,965 in 2008. Some of this overall increase comes from newly accredited schools, but most of it is faculty expansion: student-faculty ratios have been cut almost by half during this period.

      Bigger faculties must be paid for through some combination of more bodies (J.D. and LL.M) and higher tuition. Tuition already goes up every year as it is, so the number of revenue paying students cannot be reduced substantially. It's that basic. ...

      Law schools will soon suffer the consequences of this expansion. The chart below tracks the number of applicants against the number of first year students from 1990 to the present. As it shows, law schools exhibit a one-way ratchet: when applications drop, enrollment remains steady; when applications rise, enrollment goes up.

      Continued in article

      Jensen Comment
      It seems as though we're hitting times when there's an oversupply of workers in most every profession or trade, at least those that are legal. And one of the worst excess supply professions will now be the legal profession itself. Can the accounting profession be far behind --- having graduated more accountants in North America than at any other time in history?

      The oversupply of law school graduates is especially troublesome since this is where humanities undergraduates typically headed after graduating with degrees in philosophy, history, art, music, English, etc. The other track for humanities graduates is in education, as k-12 schools and colleges facing budget crunches reduce tenure-track opportunities, an abundant supply of teachers is also outstripping demand.

      And even the medical professions such as nursing are, for the first time in history, hitting oversupply walls to employment.

      What should counselors and parents advise children about careers these days? Even the military won't be a great career option when we pull our fighting men and women back from foreign wars.

    • Robert E Jensen

      "I don't want to be a police officer, firefighter, jet pilot, pro quarterback, or President of the United States. I would rather be a tax accountant."
      Parent having a fantasy conversation with their little kid.

      "Here’s a Bunch of Cute Kids Explaining Why They Want to Be Tax Accountants," by Caleb Newquist, Going Concern, November 4, 2011 ---
      http://goingconcern.com/2011/11/heres-a-bunch-of-cute-kids-explaining-why-they-want-to-be-tax-accountants/#more-51244 

      Why are these kids given scripts to read?
      The answer is that they don't even know what a tax accountant is or does.
      Police officers, on the other hand, get to carry real guns, have cars with flashing lights. live on donuts, and never get speeding tickets.

      Does anybody under the age of 19-20 really want to become a tax accountant?

      The question is why do young people eventually change their minds about becoming accounting majors?
      In my opinion, parents are the main source of inspiration, followed by older accounting students who explain why they chose this major.
      Accounting teachers in college can also play a huge role if they explain career alternatives in a truthful (no hard sell) manner.

      Bob Jensen's threads on what makes young people change their minds to major in accounting?
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/Bookbob1.htm#careers

    • Robert E Jensen

      "A Degree of Practical Wisdom:: The Ratio of Educational Debt to Income as a Basic Measurement of Law School Graduates’ Economic Viability," by Jim Chen, SSRN, December 3, 2011 ---
      http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1967266

      Abstract:     
      This article evaluates the economic viability of a student’s decision to borrow money in order to attend law school. For individuals, firms, and entire nations, the ratio of debt to income serves as a measure of economic stability. The ease with which a student can carry and retire educational debt after graduation may be the simplest measure of educational return on investment.

      Mortgage lenders evaluate prospective borrowers' debt-to-income ratios. The spread between the front-end and back-end ratios in mortgage lending provides a basis for extrapolating the maximum amount of educational debt that a student should incur. Any student whose debt service exceeds the maximum permissible spread between mortgage lenders' front-end and back-end ratios will not be able to buy a house on credit.

      These measures of affordability suggest that the maximum educational back-end ratio (EBER) should fall in a range between 8 and 12 percent of monthly gross income. Four percent would be even better. Other metrics of economic viability in servicing educational debt suggest that the ratio of total educational debt to annual income (EDAI) should range from an ideal 0.5 to a marginal 1.5.

      EBER and EDAI are mathematically related ways of measuring the same thing: a student's ability to discharge educational debt through enhanced earnings. This article offers guidance on the use of these debt-to-income ratios to assess the economic viability of students who borrow money in order to attend law school
      .

      . . .

      To offer good financial viability, defined as a ratio of education debt to annual income no greater than 0.5, post-law school salary must exceed annual tuition by a factor of 6 to 1. Adequate financial viability is realized when annual salary matches or exceeds three years of law school tuition. A marginal, arguably minimally acceptable level of financial viability requires a salary that is equal to two years’ tuition. The following table compares some tuition benchmarks with the salary needed to ensure the good, adequate, and marginal levels of financial viability identified in this article:

      Chen

       

      Jensen Comment
      This type of study, in my viewpoint, has some relevancy for professional schools beyond the bachelors degree. However, I would not recommend this type of analysis for students contemplating where to go after high school. In the first four years, students get much more out of college than career opportunities. There are liberal education quality considerations, greatness of faculty considerations, socialization experiences, dating, dorm living, and intimacy often leading to marriage. Often more expensive schools have more to offer beyond the classroom experience. By the time students are more mature after graduation from college, the importance of some of these "extracurricular" experiences often diminishes.

      And if we look at post-graduate law, medicine, engineering, and business schools, the job opportunities and salary expectations are not independent of the halo effect of where the candidate graduated. Diplomas from Harvard and Yale Law Schools add a great deal to salary expectations. And there are huge advantages of being able to network with alumni who often pave the way for job opportunities. What I'm saying is going to a law school having a tuition of $60,000 may well be worth it to graduates who take full advantage of the "extracurricular" opportunities such as networking with alumni. And for all practical purposes you can never be a U.S. Supreme Court justice unless you either graduated from Harvard or Yale law schools or were on the faculty at one of those law schools.

      In other words, if you can swing it go to Yale Law school rather than UCON (sorry Amy).

      EGADS. I'm a snob.

    • Robert E Jensen

      On December 17, 2011 Jim Martin posted the following on his MAAW Blog ---
      http://maaw.blogspot.com/2011/12/careers-with-us-government-department.html

      Careers with a U.S. Government Department or Agency
      Accounting graduates should also consider a career with the U.S. government. For links to most U.S. Government departments and agencies
      see
      http://maaw.info/NonProfitLinks.htm 

      Look for Careers and Paid Student Intern Programs, or search the sites using those terms. There are a lot of opportunities available to current and recent college graduates that should not be ignored.

      Bob Jensen's threads on accountancy careers are at
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/Bookbob1.htm#careers

    • Robert E Jensen

      Over 45,000 lawyer jobs in the United States were lost since the 2008 economic meltdown
      Should we break out the Champagne? (just kidding)

      "Law Firm Recruiting Volumes Inch Up, Making Modest Gains After Recession-Era Declines," NALP, 2012 ---
      http://www.nalp.org/uploads/PerspectivesonFall2011.pdf

      Bob Jensen's threads on careers are at
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/Bookbob1.htm#careers

    • Robert E Jensen

      Baylor Law School --- http://www.baylor.edu/law/

      The Baylor Law Data Dump
      Baylor University School of Law Reveals Each Student's Grade Average, LSAT Score, Alma Mater, Race, Ethnicity, and Scholarship Amount

      Law School Admission Test (LSAT) --- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LSAT

      Scoring

      The LSAT is a standardized test in that LSAC adjusts raw scores to fit an expected norm to overcome the likelihood that some administrations may be more difficult than others. Normalized scores are distributed on a scale with a low of 120 to a high of 180.

      The LSAT system of scoring is predetermined and does not reflect test takers' percentile, unlike the SAT. The relationship between raw questions answered correctly (the "raw score") and scaled score is determined before the test is administered, through a process called equating. This means that the conversion standard is set beforehand, and the distribution of percentiles can vary during the scoring of any particular LSAT.

      Adjusted scores resemble a bell curve, tapering off at the extremes and concentrating near the median. For example, there might be a 3-5 question difference between a score of 175 and a score of 180, but the difference between a 155 from a 160 could be 9 or more questions. Although the exact percentile of a given score will vary slightly between examinations, there tends to be little variance. The 50th percentile is typically a score of about 151; the 90th percentile is around 163 and the 99th is about 172. A 178 or better usually places the examinee in the 99.9th percentile.

      Examinees have the option of canceling their scores within six calendar days after the exam, before they get their scores. LSAC still reports to law schools that the student registered for and took the exam, but releases no score. There is a formal appeals process for examinee complaints,[16] which has been used for proctor misconduct, peer misconduct, and occasionally for challenging a question. In very rare instances, specific questions have been omitted from final scoring.

      University of North Texas economist Michael Nieswiadomy has conducted several studies (in 1998, 2006, and 2008) derived from LSAC data. In the most recent study Nieswiadomy took the LSAC's categorization of test-takers into 162 majors and grouped these into 29 categories, finding the averages of each major:[17]

      1. Mathematics/Physics 160.0
      2. Economics and Philosophy/Theology (tie) 157.4
      3. International relations 156.5
      4. Engineering 156.2
      5. Government/service 156.1
      6. Chemistry 156.1
      7. History 155.9
      8. Interdisciplinary studies 155.5
      9. Foreign languages 155.3
      10. English 155.2
      11. Biology/natural sciences 154.8
      12. Arts 154.2
      13. Computer science 154.0
      14. Finance 153.4
      15. Political science 153.1
      16. Psychology 152.5
      17. Liberal arts 152.4
      18. Anthropology/geography 152.2
      19. Accounting 151.7
      20. Journalism 151.5
      21. Sociology/social work 151.2
      22. Marketing 150.8
      23. Business management 149.7
      24. Education 149.4
      25. Business administration 149.1
      26. Health professions 148.4
      27. Pre-law 148.3
      28. Criminal justice 146.0

      The Baylor Law Data Dump --- http://abovethelaw.com/2012/04/the-baylor-law-data-dump-now-with-race-and-scholarships/2/
      If you're interested in this data it may be best to download it now. I don't expect this to remain on the Web for long.

      "The Law School System Is Broken," National Jurist, February 2012 --- Click Here
      http://www.nxtbook.com/splash/nationaljurist/nationaljurist.php?nxturl=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.nxtbook.com%2Fnxtbooks%2Fcypress%2Fnationaljurist0212%2Findex.php#/18/OnePage
      Thank you Paul Caron for the heads up

      Turkey Times for Overstuffed Law Schools ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/HigherEdControversies.htm#OverstuffedLawSchools

       

    • Robert E Jensen

      Going Concern's Admittedly Unscientific 2012 Survey of Starting Salaries for New Accounting Graduates ---
      http://goingconcern.com/post/recruiting-season-public-accounting-salaries-starting-class-2013

      Jensen Comment
      Keep in mind that cost of living varies.
      When I was still teaching it was somewhat easier to get a Big Four starting job in San Francisco relative to San Antonio. In San Francisco the salary would hardly pay for a one-room apartment without partnering to share the rent. Starting salaries are often not fully adjusted for higher cost-of-living cities.

      Also I will mention my oft-repeated advice to college graduates. The amount of starting salary should be a low priority relative to prospective employer training, exposure to clients who are often the way career tracks head after a year or two with a CPA firm, opportunities in areas of interest such as tax or IT, and opportunities for international transfer (e.g., to Asia), and expected travel requirements (tough for expecting parents), and opportunity for work at home (great for expecting parents).

      CPA firms do not offer high enough salaries for entry-level auditing and tax to attract graduates from prestigious MBA programs. These firms do not hire many such MBA graduates and when they do hire these graduates at higher salaries it is generally for consulting rather than auditing and tax. CPA firms generally want consultants who have considerable on-the-job training and special skills such as IT and language skills.

      Bob Jensen's threads on careers are at
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/Bookbob1.htm#careers

    • Robert E Jensen

      "Is Law School Worth It?" by Adam Freedman, Legal Aid, February 22, 2013 ---
      http://legallad.quickanddirtytips.com/is-law-school-worth-it.aspx

      Bob Jensen's threads on careers ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/Bookbob1.htm#careers

      From Paul Caron's TaxProf Blog on February 20, 2013 --- http://taxprof.typepad.com/

      NLJ: Update on Lawsuits Against Law Schools Over Allegedly Fraudulent Placement Data

      National Law Journal:  Plaintiffs Take Law School Fraud Cases to New York's Highest Court:

      The New York courts haven't been friendly to a spate of fraud class actions targeting law schools, but the attorneys behind the suits aren't throwing in the towel just yet.

      They have asked the New York State Court of Appeals to review an intermediate appellate panel's December dismissal of a suit brought by nine former students who allege New York Law School inflated its postgraduate employment statistics to trick them into enrolling.

      The plaintiff's legal team—led by Jesse Strauss, Frank Raimond and David Anziska—argued in a motion for leave to appeal filed on February 19 that the Court of Appeal—New York's highest court—should weigh in on the case, given that several lower court judges have cited differing grounds for dismissing nearly identical cases. The New York dismissals also are out of sync with rulings in California that have been more favorable to similar fraud suits, they argued. ...

      The New York Law School case was among the first of the 15 fraud actions against law schools around the country. (Different attorneys are handling the very first case, against Thomas Jefferson School of Law.)

      New York County, N.Y., Supreme Court Justice Melvin Schweitzer dismissed the New York Law School case in March 2012—the first in a set of legal roadblocks the law school litigants have faced. ...

      A trial judge dismissed a nearly identical case against Albany Law School in early January, and Strauss said he was preparing an appeal. The parties were still awaiting a decision on the motion to dismiss their case against Brooklyn Law School, which Kings County, N.Y., Supreme Court Justice David Schmidt heard last August. A motion to dismiss their case against the Hofstra University Maurice A. Deane School of Law was also pending.

      Similar suits have also faced an uphill climb in Illinois, where cases against DePaul University College of Law, Chicago-Kent College of Law and The John Marshall Law School have been dismissed. There is likely to be a consolidated appeal in those cases, Strauss said.

      Their fraud suit against the Thomas M. Cooley Law School also was dismissed, and is under appeal before the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit.

      California has been the one bright spot for plaintiffs in law school litigation, with suits against California Western School of Law; Golden Gate University School of Law; the University of San Francisco School of Law; Southwestern Law School and Thomas Jefferson School of Law surviving initial motions to dismiss.

      Jensen Comments
      One of the major purposes for publicizing fraudulent placement data was for higher media rankings, especially in the US News rankings of colleges, universities, and programs. Some universities faked like Bucknell University faked the overall university admissions data. Some universities like Tulane faked MBA admissions data. And of course there were quite a few law schools that faked admissions data as well as placements data.

      There were also instances of faked or highly misleading placements data.

      Bob Jensen's threads on media ranking controversies ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/HigherEdControversies.htm#BusinessSchoolRankings

    • Robert E Jensen

      "Tax Professionals Will Continue To Be in Great Demand for Years," by Frank Byrt, AccountingWeb, March 3, 2013 ---
       
      http://www.accountingweb.com/article/tax-professionals-will-continue-be-great-demand-years/221256?source=education