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    The Effect of Information Choice on Auditors’ Judgments a...
    research summary posted October 12, 2016 by Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips, tagged 05.0 Audit Team Composition, 05.05 Diversity of Skill Sets e.g., Tenure and Experience, 06.0 Risk and Risk Management, Including Fraud Risk, 06.09 Litigation Risk, 09.0 Auditor Judgment, 09.10 Prior Dispositions/Biases/Auditor state of mind, 11.0 Audit Quality and Quality Control, 11.09 Evaluation of Evidence 
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    Title:
    The Effect of Information Choice on Auditors’ Judgments and Confidence
    Practical Implications:

     Implications for the practicing audit community are developed from the findings that less experienced auditors are susceptible to the information choice effect. In situations where litigation risk is low (high) and the auditor has less experience, auditors place greater (lower) significance on information given to them by an external party than information they sought out themselves. More experienced auditors are not subject to the information choice effect. Additionally, more experienced auditors are confident in judgments based on information sought themselves, even in a setting with elevated litigation risk. The results of this study may interest audit clients providing information to auditors, auditors reviewing the work of less (more) experienced colleagues, auditors performing a critical self-review, and regulators reviewing the work of auditors.

    Citation:

     Smith, S. D., W. B. Tayler, and D. F. Prawitt. 2016. The Effect of Information Choice on Auditors' Judgments and Confidence. Accounting Horizons 30 (3): 393–408.

    Keywords:
    information choice, litigation risk, confidence, experience, judgment impact
    Purpose of the Study:

    During the course of an audit, auditors choose what information they need to search for; however, they obtain both sought and unsought information.  These auditors must then use the information obtained to make judgements and decisions that ultimately lead to an audit opinion.  Thus, the weight auditors place on the information obtained when making judgements and the auditors’ confidence in those judgements has important implications for audit quality.  The authors of this paper investigate whether it matters if information is gotten by the auditor or given to the auditor.  Understanding that the way in which information is received affects information processing, the authors examine how the auditors’ receipt of additional sought or unsought information impacts the auditors’ judgment and confidence in that judgement given judgements with different levels of importance (e.g., high vs. low litigation risk) and auditors with different levels of experience (e.g., high vs. low).

    Design/Method/ Approach:

    Evidence was obtained during the 2010’s through an experiment using 136 auditors as participants.  Participants read a case and evaluated the likelihood of obsolescence in inventory.  The researchers manipulated the (1) choice to acquire relevant information (i.e., given a choice or not given a choice) and (2) litigation risk levels (i.e., high or low).  Furthermore, they measured auditor experience, and classified participants as more or less experienced based on number of years in public accounting.

    Findings:
    • In the high litigation setting, sought information is weighed more heavily than unsought information.  This result appears to be driven by auditor experience.  Specifically, when auditor experience is low and litigation risk is high, sought information is weighed more heavily than unsought information.
    • In the low litigation setting, sought information is weighed less heavily than unsought information.  This result appears to be driven by auditor experience.  Specifically, when auditor experience is low and litigation risk is low, information is weighed less heavily than unsought information.
    • Auditor confidence in their judgment of inventory obsolescence was greater when they chose to obtain additional information than when they were just given the additional information.  This result appears to be driven by auditor experience.  Specifically, more experienced auditors had greater confidence after obtaining sought information than unsought information.  This results also appears to depend on the litigation level.  In the high litigation setting, more experienced auditors had greater confidence after obtaining sought information than unsought information.
    Category:
    Audit Quality & Quality Control, Audit Team Composition, Auditor Judgment, Risk & Risk Management - Including Fraud Risk
    Sub-category:
    Diversity of Skill Sets (e.g. Tenure & Experience), Evaluation of Evidence, Litigation Risk, Prior Dispositions/Biases/Auditor state of mind