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    New Feature: Member blogs!
    blog entry posted July 7, 2010 by Julie Smith David, last edited February 10, 2012 
    2926 Views, 10 Comments
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    New Feature: Member blogs!
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    member blogsI'm happy to announce that the AAACommons is now able to support our members by enabling Member Blogs!

    A blog is a "web log," or an online journal, that supports people sharing their insights - either about their lives or their professions.  The Presidents, the AAA headquarters, and the AAACommons have had blogs for several months, and now that we've worked out some kinks, we're ready to support others in their blogging efforts.

    To further test things, Rick Lillie has graciously volunteered to become our next blogger.  e-mail subscribeHe is an expert in using technology to enhance his teaching, and his blog will share many of his insights with others!  (click here to go to it directly) If you want to follow him closely, you can click the e-mail subscription button, or the RSS feed button, both in the upper right hand corner of all AAACommons hives (the "spaces" in which we store content).  If you subscribe with e-mail, you can specify if you want an e-mail sent whenever Rick posts to his blog, or you can specify you also want an e-mail when people comment.  If you choose RSS feed, that means that the blog will be "pushed" to a reader that you use.  I, for example, have an iGoogle page, and it collects all of the blog postings for all of the blogs I follow.  That way I just have one place to go to read everything!

    Finally, we have heard from several people that they'd like to hear more informally from subject matter experts.  Is that you?  Do you know who they are in your section or region?  We'd love to help others set up their blogs - and everyone can look forward to learning a lot from our colleagues!

    Comment

     

    • Robert E Jensen

      From the Scout Report on October 1, 2010

      EduBlogs --- http://edublogs.org/ 

      Started in 2005, Edublogs has grown to include almost 60,000 blogs started by people all over the world. The Edublogs site can be used by anyone to create blogs with education content, and most school filters will allow their software to run correctly. The site includes a video introduction on how to get started, and teachers will appreciate that Edublogs includes discussion tools, video embedding, and social media options. Visitors can customize their blog by using over 100 different themes to give each one the personal touch. EduBlogs is compatible with all operating systems, and their site also includes a FAQ section and training guides.

      Bob Jensen's threads on accounting blogs --- http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/ListServRoles.htm

    • Robert E Jensen

      Bob Jensen's threads on accounting blogs ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/ListServRoles.htm 

       

      Example
       FraudBytes (Mark Zimbelman) --- http://fraudbytes.blogspot.com/

    • Robert E Jensen

      Accounting Is a Sewer
      If you think we're sometimes critical of the accounting profession and the accounting academy on the AECM, you ain't heard nuthin' until you've heard from the likes of Adrienne  --- http://www.jrdeputyaccountant.com/p/about.html
      "Accounting Is a Sewer" --- Click Here
      http://www.jrdeputyaccountant.com/2010/12/accounting-is-sewer.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed:+blogspot/OVWr+(Jr+Deputy+Accountant)  

      You can follow Adrienne's diatribe at
      http://www.jrdeputyaccountant.com

    • Robert E Jensen

      I must thank Professor Albrecht for the honor.
       "Prof Albrecht’s Most Influential," by David Albrecht, The Summa, August 28, 2011 ---
       http://profalbrecht.wordpress.com/2011/08/28/profalbrechts-most-influential/

    • Robert E Jensen

      "Why Do Accounting Academics Blog Less Than Other Academics?" by Tom Selling, The Accounting Onion, October 11, 2011 ---
      http://accountingonion.typepad.com/theaccountingonion/2011/10/why-do-accounting-academics-blog-less-than-other-academics.html

      Continued in article

      Jensen Comment
      The phrase "blog less" has two meanings. One is that there are fewer accounting professor/student bloggers than in other disciplines. This is largely due to the fact that accounting is a smaller academic discipline than many of our brethren in humanities, mathematics, and science.

      Second is that there might be comparable number of academic accounting bloggers who post less frequently than their brethren in humanities and science. At first blush this is a bit surprising to me since accounting is a dynamic discipline with many things taking place globally every day in media fraud articles, news from international and national accounting standard setting bodies, etc. It could be that we, as academic accountants, tend to rely on a small number of commercial blogs such as those of the Big Four, the AICPA, SmartPros, AccountingWeb, GoingConcern, re:TheAuditors, etc. These popular commercial blogs may reduce the need for more accounting professors to blog or to post multiple messages daily.

      Many academic accountants have come to rely on blog aggregators and filters. For example, I suspect that the AECM listserv has a larger daily audience reading a larger number of AECM postings than readings of any accounting professor who blogs. Also intense debates on the AECM reveal more intense and enduring debates on issues than the commentaries at accounting professor blogging sites.

      The AAA Commons is also becoming increasingly popular among accounting academics. For example, it could be that more people frequent the postings of Rick Lillie via the AAA Commons than frequent his blog. I do not, however, know this for a fact.

      We also must consider the fact that social networkings (e.g., Twitter and Facebook) reduce the blogging traffic.

      Be that as it may, I think there are quite a few blogging professors who have relatively small audiences. The small audiences tend to discourage new entrants into the blogging arena. For a listing of some of the academic accounting bloggers go to
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/ListservRoles.htm
      There are too many for me to monitor even on a weekly basis.

    • Robert E Jensen

      "6 Tips For Building a High Quality Blog Following," by Shane Snow, Marshable, January 3, 2012 ---
      http://ht.ly/8gu3L
      Thank you Robert Harris for the heads up.

      Jensen Comment
      Keys to success for a Website are somewhat different than keys to success for a blogging site. For a Website the key to success is content --- lots of it even if the content is narrowly focused. The reason is that the most hits usually come for users of Web crawlers like Google, Yahoo, and Bing. For blog posts, huge-content files can become wearisome.

      Bob Jensen's threads on accounting education blogs are at
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/ListservRoles.htm

    • Robert E Jensen

      I recall that Tony Catanach was at a loss when he was considering a new blogging platform for The Grumpy Old Accountants blog. Our AECM advice was sort of ad hoc. The following article may have been of more help.

      The 15 best blogging and publishing platforms on the Internet today. Which one is for you?
      http://thenextweb.com/apps/2013/08/16/best-blogging-services/

      Bob Jensen's threads on listservs, blogs, and the social media ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/ListservRoles.htm

    • Robert E Jensen

      "Blogging changes the nature of academic research, not just how it is communicated," by Patrick Dunleavy, London School of Economics, January 2015 ---
      http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/impactofsocialsciences/2014/12/28/shorter-better-faster-free/

      Academic blogging gets your work and research out to a potentially massive audience at very, very low cost and relative amount of effort. Patrick Dunleavy argues blogging and tweeting from multi-author blogs especially is a great way to build knowledge of your work, to grow readership of useful articles and research reports, to build up citations, and to foster debate across academia, government, civil society and the public in general.

      One of the recurring themes (from many different contributors) on the LSE Impact of Social Science blog is that a new paradigm of research communications has grown up — one that de-emphasizes the traditional journals route, and re-prioritizes faster, real-time academic communication. Blogs play a critical intermediate role. They link to research reports and articles on the one hand, and they are linked to from Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, Tumblr and Google+ news-streams and communities. So in research terms blogging is quite simply, one of the most important things that an academic should be doing right now.

      But in addition, STEM scientists, social scientists and humanities scholars all have an obligation to society to contribute their observations to the wider world. At the moment that’s often being done

      • in ramshackle and impoverished ways
      • in pointlessly obscure or charged-for forums
      • in difficult language where you need to look up every second word in Wikipedia. Some of this is necessary for condensed specialist communication. But much of it is just unneeded jargon and poor writing dressed up as necessary vocabulary
      • with acres of ‘dead-on-arrival’ data (that will never be used by anyone else in the world), often presented in unreadable tables
      • and all delivered over bizarrely long-winded timescales. From submission to publication in some top economics journals now takes 3.5 years. At the end of such a process any published paper is no more than a tombstone marking where happening debate and knowledge used to be, four or five years earlier.

      So the public pay for all or much of our research (especially in Europe and Australasia). And then we shunt back to them a few press releases and a lot of out-of-date, arcanely phrased academic junk.

      Types of blogs

      A lot of people think that all blogs are solo blogs, but this is a completely out of date view. A ‘blog’ is defined by Wikipedia as:

      ‘a truncation of the expression web log… [It] is a discussion or informational site published on the World Wide Web and consisting of discrete entries (“posts”) typically displayed in reverse chronological order (the most recent post appears first). Until 2009 blogs were usually the work of a single individual, occasionally of a small group, and often covered a single subject. More recently “multi-author blogs” (MABs) have developed, with posts written by large numbers of authors and professionally edited. MABs from newspapers, other media outlets, universities, think tanks, advocacy groups and similar institutions account for an increasing quantity of blog traffic. The rise of Twitter and other “microblogging” systems helps integrate MABs and single-author blogs into societal newstreams’. [Accessed 29 August 2014]. (Let me pause here to reassure some academic readers who may be bristling at being asked to read Wikipedia text – I know this passage is sound since I co-wrote much of it).

      Actually the evolution of academic blogs specifically has now progressed even further, so that we can distinguish group or collaborative blogs as an important intermediate type between solo blogs and multi-author blogs. The two tables below summarize how these three types of blogs now work, drawing attention to their very different advantages and disadvantages.

      Continued in article

      I recall that Tony Catanach was at a loss when he was considering a new blogging platform for The Grumpy Old Accountants blog. Our AECM advice was sort of ad hoc. The following article may have been of more help.

      The 15 best blogging and publishing platforms on the Internet today. Which one is for you?
      http://thenextweb.com/apps/2013/08/16/best-blogging-services/

      50 Good (not necessarily best) accounting blogs ---
      http://www.accounting-degree.org/50-best-accounting-blogs-of-2014/

      Do you really want to start your own blog?

      A blog that is well done will take almost all your time.

      The benefits lie firstly in how much you learn by doing a blog, especially what you learn from other blogs you visit often. You also learn from replies of other people to your blog. For example, today I naively stated that Fusion 3 is great for running the Windows OS on a Mac but that it probably would not run the new Windows 7. In less than an hour my good friend Glenn Kroeger (geology professor at Trinity University and super geek) set me straight that Fusion 3 works great on a high powered Mac.

      Secondly, giving something back to a world, a profession, and many friends you meet along the way is a tremendous intrinsic reward. I discuss this under the term listserv at http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/ListservRoles.htm#ListServs

      The problem with blogs is that there are now millions of great blogs in the world and hundreds in the field of accountancy. It's impossible to keep up with all of them.

      Grad Life: McGill University Blogs --- http://blogs.mcgill.ca/gradlife/

      Years later, here I am, with a Ph.D. and years of experience behind me, writing regularly for three different blogs--one of them a blog of my own. I haven't published a paper in an academic journal yet (for now, the standard currency for academic credibility) . . .
      Liana Silva whose blog at Inside Higher Ed is called University of Venus

      "So You Want to Blog (Academic Edition), by Liana Silva, Inside Higher Ed, May  12, 2013 ---
      http://www.insidehighered.com//blogs/university-venus/so-you-want-blog-academic-edition

      When I was a Master's student (almost a decade ago), I started blogging. It was a messy endeavor: a Blogger site with some random posts that didn't amount to much. I worked more on the layout than the content. I didn't get many page views, and I felt no motivation to continue working on it.

      Years later, here I am, with a Ph.D. and years of experience behind me, writing regularly for three different blogs--one of them a blog of my own. I haven't published a paper in an academic journal yet (for now, the standard currency for academic credibility), but I believe that my writing chops across genres have improved, my voice comes through my writing, and my awareness of audience is sharper. As a result, I am invested in my online presence as a blogger, and more broadly as a writer. Moreover, I believe that blogs can help writers, especially academic writers, become better communicators.

      As an editor for two academic blogs, I thrive off of helping writers hone their ideas, but more importantly helping them get their voices online, as clearly as possible. My years of experience working as an editor and at a University writing center have taught me that writers need not just someone to clean up their prose (which is the more common interpretation of editor) but also someone who can find the idea they are trying to convey. In other words, they need someone who can help make those ideas crystal clear. For academic writers, this can be tough because of the supposed conventions of academic writing (even though most of the scholars I know prefer the kind of writing that is clear, concise, and striking). For better or for worse, we learn how to write in our disciplines mostly through example, and the examples we are presented with are most often found in traditional academic journals.

      Academic blogging can coexist with these academic journals and help writers develop their ideas by taking them for a trial run with readers before committing them to a journal article. However, traditional academic writing, with its lengthy paragraphs, heavy footnotes, and discipline-specific jargon, may not translate well to blogging. Here are some suggestions (which solely reflect my experience as a blogger and as an editor for blogs):

      You don't have to have an airtight argument. We're taught to think in terms of arguments, of polished prose. But in blogging, you can explore a question, and not answer it. The conversation that arises in the comments section could help you get to an answer. Think about the length. Technically, a blog post can be as long as you want it to be, but be aware of when you drone on and on about a subject. Just because you can doesn't mean you should. Consider whether a post is better off broken up into two posts--or several. Moreover, some blogs have word limits: here at U Venus we aim for the 750 word range; at Sounding Out! we tell writers to aim for 1500 words. Reading does not have to always be an endurance test--and length does not testify for the complexity of ideas. Consider language. If you feel comfortable writing in a casual tone, that's alright in a blog post, even if it is an academic topic. That adds to the voice of the piece. However, this also depends on the subject. Ultimately, don't feel like your posts needs to be serious or stuffy because it is an academic topic. Share your research interests. You don't have to give everything away if you don't want to. I know a lot of academics have a fear of being scooped, and their fears are not unfounded: it has happened. Publishing a blog post doesn't have to lead to that. In fact, it could be a teaser of something you're working on that could bring more readers to that finished product. It can also help you make your mark in your field. You don't have to upload your whole dissertation on a website--if you don't want to. Ask for feedback. Unsure about the subject? Unsure about the tone? Ask your editor. Editors are here to help you; some may not have the time to answer. But some may be able to give you more focused feedback. At both of the blogs I work for we give different kinds of feedback, but we make sure to give writers feedback to help them take their writing to the next level. If you're blogging at your own blog, ask your readers. Share the post with people you hope that give you feedback. Don't be afraid to ask.

      Read more: http://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/university-venus/so-you-want-blog-academic-edition#ixzz2TGiA8BPP Inside Higher Ed

      Continued in article

      Bob Jensen's threads on blogs, listservs, and social networking ---
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/ListservRoles.htm

      "6 Tips For Building a High Quality Blog Following," by Shane Snow, Marshable, January 3, 2012 ---
      http://ht.ly/8gu3L
      Thank you Robert Harris for the heads up.

      Jensen Comment
      Keys to success for a Website are somewhat different than keys to success for a blogging site. For a Website the key to success is content --- lots of it even if the content is narrowly focused. The reason is that the most hits usually come for users of Web crawlers like Google, Yahoo, and Bing. For blog posts, huge-content files can become wearisome.

      Bob Jensen's threads on accounting education blogs are at
      http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/ListservRoles.htm

    • Robert E Jensen

      Hi Glen,

      I am including some Websites here, because the archives of some blogs are very much like Websites (that can be searched by Web crawlers). For example, I consider the MAAW Website the most important consideration for most accounting course syllabi, but Jim's blog is so infrequent I would not list it as among the most important blogs for syllabi.
      MAAW Websote (Tremendous Archive) --- http://www.maaw.info/
      MAAW Blog --- http://maaw.blogspot.com/

      Other Infrequent Blogs
      There are many accounting blogs that are terribly infrequent such that I would not include them for current news. However, you may want to consider using them for their archives. Some examples (mere samplings off the top of my head) include:

       

      More Frequent Blogs
      Each of the Big Four firms have blogs and/or newsletters
      I subscribe to all of their newsletters

      Deloitte's International Accounting Blog --- http://www.iasplus.com/index.htm

      FEI Daily --- http://daily.financialexecutives.org/

      Paul Caron Tax Prof --- http://taxprof.typepad.com/

      XBRL (Eric Cohen) --- http://www.computercpa.com/

      Tom Selling generally has commentaries on accounting standards 9my replies are on the AECM)
      The Accounting Onion---
      http://accountingonion.com/

      Dennis Elam Blog (often about fraud and forensics) ---
      http://www.professorelam.typepad.com/

      Accounting Association Blogs --- http://www.accounting-degree.org/50-best-accounting-blogs-of-2014/

      • Betsy’s Pretty Good Blog: A blog for accountants by the president of the MNCPA (Minnesota Society of Certified Public Accountants).
      • AICPA Insights: A blog for accountants from the AICPA (American Institute of CPAs).
      • CPA Success: Career success tips and advice for CPAs, from the MACPA (Maryland Association of CPAs).
      • CPA Now: Tips and advice for CPAs from the PICPA (Pennsylvania Institute of Certified Public Accountants).
      • ASCPA Blog: Tips and advice for CPAs from the ASCPA (Arizona Society of Certified Public Accountants).
      • I Was Just Thinkin’: Tips and advice for CPAs from the INCPAS (Indiana CPA Society).
      • TSCPA Federal Tax Policy Blog: A blog from the TSCPA (Texas Society of CPAs), with a focus on tax legislation and regulation.
      • The Sharblog: Another TSCPA-related blog, from the CEO, with thoughts on accounting, the IRS and other topics.
      • National Society of Accountants: NSA Blog: Perspectives on accounting, tax prep, IRS and more, from the other NSA (National Society of Accountants).
      • NYSSCPA Blog: Views on accounting and related topics from the NYSSCPA (New York State Society of Certified Public Accountants.
      • CPA Cafe | Where Ideas Brew: Writings on accounting, taxes, IRS and other topics from the VSCPA (Virginia Society of Certified Public Accountants).


        Boards of Accountancy Links (most have newsletters and/or blogs)
        http://nasba.org/stateboards/

       

      David Albrecht's List of Accounting Professors Who Blog (some no longer blog) ---
      https://profalbrecht.wordpress.com/2008/12/26/accounting-professors-who-blog/

       

      Bob Jensen's Threads --- http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/Threads.htm
      For earlier editions of Fraud Updates go to http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/FraudUpdates.htm
      For earlier editions of Tidbits go to http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/TidbitsDirectory.htm
      For earlier editions of New Bookmarks go to http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/bookurl.htm 
      Bookmarks for the World's Library --- http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/bookbob2.htm 

    • Robert E Jensen

      The Guardian:  Why are so many YouTubers finding themselves stressed, lonely and exhausted? ---
      https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2018/sep/08/youtube-stars-burnout-fun-bleak-stressed

      Jensen Comment
      I hesitate to say that this is also a problem for bloggers, but most of the faculty bloggers in accountancy dropped out or greatly slowed down, including some of my favorites like The Grumpy Old Accountants, Accounting Education News, Accountinator, Accounting Cycle, Building Business Value, FraudBytes (nothing for nine months), MyEMBA, Pondering the Classroom, RandomThoughts (nothing in nine months), Really Engaging Accounting, Stephen Lynn's Blog, Stategic Management Accounting, Teaching Managerial Accounting, The Professor's Perspective, The Summa, The TaxDoc Spot, The Trite's E-Business Blog (Jerry still has a Zorba blog), The Accounting Coach, The XBRL Canada Blog, Thinking Outside the Box, Tic Marks, Análise de Balanço, Globaliconta, Ideias Contábeis, and Professor Lopes de Sá. The Accounting Onion is temporarily out of action, but it will probably return when Tom has fewer irons in the fire.

      I suspect virtually every other academic discipline had short-lived blogs by faculty who burned out of blogging or ceased blogging for whatever reasons.

      The AECM Listserv is a unique forum where accounting educators (and others) enter into debates as well as add news items. Many of the most active contributors, however, have dropped out such that there are many lurkers and only a few actives. I miss some of the former actives who liked to needle me and egg me on. I also miss some genuine experts who broadened my understanding of the world (like David Fordham) and some who were outrageous (like David Albrecht).

      What is really disappointing to me is that I can't think of an accounting educator from a prestigious university who blogs. Accountics scientists rarely stick their heads out of the ground. If I'm missing somebody here please let me know! They sometimes contribute working papers to SSRN, but the SSRN has a wall preventing interactive exchanges with authors. It's like they don't want to be bothered by readers.

      I really, really miss the Grumpy Old Accountants because they adopted the Abe Briloff (Barrons) style of criticizing published financial statements. I also miss Accounting Education News that kept me up to date on happenings on the other side of the pond.