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    COMMENTARY FROM THE AMERICAN ACCOUNTING ASSOCIATION’S 2011 A...
    research summary posted October 22, 2013 by Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips, tagged 06.0 Risk and Risk Management, Including Fraud Risk, 06.02 Fraud Risk Models, 09.0 Auditor Judgment, 09.10 Prior Dispositions/Biases/Auditor state of mind 
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    Title:
    COMMENTARY FROM THE AMERICAN ACCOUNTING ASSOCIATION’S 2011 ANNUAL MEETING PANEL ON EMERGING ISSUES IN FRAUD RESEARCH
    Practical Implications:

    When performing brainstorming sessions as mandated by SAS 99, auditors should brainstorm personality traits that may reveal potential fraudsters. Additionally, firms and academics should work to identify characteristics that provide an indication of which individuals are more likely to commit fraud.

    For more information on this study, please contact Sara Melendy.
     

    Citation:

    Brody, R. G., S. R. Melendy, and F. S. Perri 2012. Commentary from the American Accounting Association’s 2011 annual meeting panel on emerging issues in fraud research. Accounting Horizons 26 (3): 513-531.

    Keywords:
    None
    Purpose of the Study:

    During one of the investigative accounting panels at the American Accounting Association’s 2011 annual meeting, panelists discussed various issues related to fraud and fraud research. This article summarizes their discussion, and also draws upon some of the relevant published literature to highlight some of the fraud topics that are still largely unexplored and thus ripe for academic research. Additionally, the purpose of this paper is to (1) critically evaluate the state of current fraud research and provide guidance for future researchers, and (2) examine the publication process for both practitioner and scholarly journals from both an editorial and topical perspective.

    Design/Method/ Approach:

    This paper summarizes and synthesizes information from the American Accounting Association’s 2011 annual meeting and includes existent fraud research.

    Findings:

    There are important misperceptions about the nature of fraudsters. Important among these misperceptions are the following items:
    •    fraud is a one-time offense
    •    fraud is an out-of-character crime
    •    fraudsters are non-violent offenders
     

    Category:
    Auditor Judgment, Risk & Risk Management - Including Fraud Risk
    Sub-category:
    Fraud Risk Models, Prior Dispositions/Biases/Auditor state of mind