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    The Interactive Effects of Internal Control Audits and...
    research summary posted July 28, 2015 by Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips, tagged 01.0 Standard Setting, 01.04 Impact of 404, 01.05 Impact of SOX, 07.0 Internal Control, 07.05 Impact of 404 on Fees and Financial Reporting Quality 
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    Title:
    The Interactive Effects of Internal Control Audits and Manager Legal Liability on Managers' Internal Controls Decisions, Investor Confidence, and Market Prices.
    Practical Implications:

    The results demonstrate a demand for IC audits such that, even in the presence of increased manager liability, the IC audit incrementally motivates managers to spend on improving IC and to provide more consistent and accurate ICFR disclosures. Unlike managers, investors react as though manager liability and IC audits are substitutes. This finding has implications for policymakers as it demonstrates the need to consider the possible differing effects of regulation on managers and investors. Moreover, with respect to regulatory actions to simultaneously implement both manager liability and an IC audit, the results suggest that both mechanisms may not be necessary to improve investors’ confidence and in turn market prices.

    Citation:

    Wu, Y., & Tuttle, B. 2014. The Interactive Effects of Internal Control Audits and Manager Legal Liability on Managers' Internal Controls Decisions, Investor Confidence, and Market Prices. Contemporary Accounting Research 31 (2): 444-468.

    Keywords:
    internal controls, internal auditing, investor confidence, Sarbanes-Oxley
    Purpose of the Study:

    This study investigates the effects of the audit of internal controls (IC audit) and manager liability for the company’s internal controls on investor confidence and market prices. This research is motivated by the substantial debate regarding the incremental effectiveness of IC audits and manager liability on investor confidence in financial disclosures. This debate came to the forefront with the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (SOX) when the U.S. Congress simultaneously implemented both regulatory mechanisms. Section 302 requires that CEOs and CFOs personally attest, under penalty of perjury, that effective internal controls over financial reporting (ICFR) have been established, maintained, and evaluated on a timely basis. Section 404 requires that the auditors of publicly-traded companies provide assurance on the effectiveness of ICFR. However, direct empirical evidence remains limited regarding the individual versus joint effectiveness of these two regulatory mechanisms in (1) motivating managers to spend on improving ICFR and to provide more accurate ICFR disclosures and (2) improving investor confidence and market prices.

    Design/Method/ Approach:

    Seventy-six MBA students from a major public university participated in this study. The 76 participants resulted in a total of 19 sessions with four participants assigned to each. The experiment is programmed and conducted using ZTree software. Each session takes approximately 90 minutes and includes three practice rounds followed by 21 experimental rounds. The number of rounds is not known by participants. The evidence was collected prior to the summer of 2014.

    Findings:
    • Results suggest that the effects of manager liability and an IC audit are additive with respect to IC spending, with the IC audit having a stronger effect than manager liability.
    • Even after controlling for managers’ IC spending, results also demonstrate that IC audits improve the accuracy of managers’ ICFR disclosures.
    • Similar improvement is not associated with increased manager liability. In the presence of the IC audit, managers’ IC spending strategies are more constant over time and enable managers to provide accurate information more consistently regarding the effectiveness of ICFR.
    • Managers will spend more to improve ICFR when either liability or IC audits are present and that even in the presence of manager liability the IC audit incrementally increases managers IC spending.
    • The results demonstrate that investor confidence and stock price are no greater when both regulatory mechanisms are present than when only one is present.
    • Supplemental analyses suggest that manager reputation for accurate ICFR disclosures explains, at least in part, why investors perceive manager liability and IC audit to be substitutes.
    • The results suggest that when managers accrue a reputation for accurate ICFR disclosures, both regulatory mechanisms may not be necessary to improve investor confidence in managers’ earnings reports.
    Category:
    Internal Control, Standard Setting
    Sub-category:
    Impact of 404 on Fees and Financial Reporting Quality, Impact of 404, Impact of SOX