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  • Zane L Swanson
    Knowledge Management for the Converged IASB and FASB...
    paper presentation posted July 28, 2011 by Zane L Swanson 
    title:
    Knowledge Management for the Converged IASB and FASB Standards
    author or authors:
    Zane Swanson University of Central Oklahoma
    presentation session:
    Research Interaction Forum I
    date:
    August 8, 2011 10:30am - 12:00pm
    abstract:

    This project utilizes knowledge management as a means of organizing FASB and IFRS ontological structures.

  • Natalia Maksimovna Mintchik
    Institutional investor preferences for analyst forecast...
    paper presentation posted July 29, 2010 by Natalia Maksimovna Mintchik 
    title:
    Institutional investor preferences for analyst forecast accuracy: does investment strategy matter?
    author or authors:
    Natalia Mintchik, University of Missouri-St. Louis; Pamela Stuerke, University of Missouri-St. Louis; Gaiyan Zhang, University of Missouri-St. Louis and Ashley Wang, University of California-Irvine
    moderator:
    N/A
    discussant:
    N/A
    presentation session:
    Research Interactive Session IV
    date:
    August 3, 2010 6:00pm - 7:30pm
    abstract:

    In this study, we examine the association between analyst earnings forecast error and a refined measure of institutional ownership for different groups of institutional investors: transient, dedicated, and quasi-indexers. We hypothesize that transient investors will have higher investment in companies with more accurate earnings forecasts (lower forecast error) because they perceive forecast accuracy as the signal of decreased price impact of trades and increased profit trading opportunities. We also have speculated that dedicated investors will have lower investment in companies with more accurate earnings forecasts (lower forecast error) because of their concerns about lost information advantage and potential overpricing. We have assumed that the accuracy of earnings forecasts is not relevant for the investment decisions of quasi-indexers. Therefore, we haven’t expected to find any association between analyst earnings forecast error and extent of ownership by quasi-indexers in those companies. 

    Empirical evidence suggests that transient investors are indeed drawn to companies with lower forecast errors and increase (decrease) their holdings when the forecast error decreases (increases). However, the evidence on the behavior of dedicated investors and quasi-indexers reveals more complex decision pattern. Overall, controlling for endogeneity, forecast error does not impact levels of ownership by quasi-indexers or dedicated investors. At the same time, our changes analyses suggest that quasi-indexers decrease their holdings in response to forecast error declines while dedicated investors increase their holdings in response to forecast error increases. We also document differences in preferences of different types of institutional investors toward other basic corporate characteristics such as company size, leverage, and stock turnover.

    These findings should be of relevance for financial analysts and for researchers examining earnings management/earnings forecast accuracy. They highlight the importance to adjust for investors’ heterogeneity in research models rather than to cast institutional investors as a homogeneous group. Our findings indicate that, whether they are aware of it or not, in their attempts to achieve “predictable earnings” both management and analysts appeal mainly to one type of institutional investors: transient.

  • Richard C Sansing
    Financial accounting measures of tax reporting...
    paper presentation posted July 19, 2010 by Richard C Sansing 
    title:
    Financial accounting measures of tax reporting aggressiveness
    author or authors:
    Anja De Waegenaere (Tilburg University); Richard Sansing (Dartmouth College and CentER, Tilburg Univeristy; Jacco L. Wielhouwer, VU University;
    moderator:
    Sarah Nutter
    discussant:
    Robert J. Egger III
    presentation session:
    2.9, Taxes and Financial Reporting
    date:
    August 2, 2010 5:00pm - 6:30pm
    abstract:

    This study examines a setting in which a tax reporting decision is delegated to a firm's tax manager. The use of financial accounting measures of tax expense arises endogenously as an efficient way of providing contemporaneous incentives to the manager when the consequences of the tax reporting decision will occur in the future. The study also examines the relations between the firm's tax aggressiveness and three accounting measures of tax aggressiveness: cash taxes paid, book tax expense, and the unrecognized tax benefit. The unrecognized tax benefit is the best measure of taxpayer aggressiveness if compliance with FIN 48 is high, but is the worst measure if compliance with FIN 48 is low.

  • Marc DePree
    University and AACSB Diversity, Case Research9
    paper presentation posted June 28, 2010 by Marc DePree 
    title:
    University and AACSB Diversity, Case Research
    author or authors:
    Chauncey M. DePree, Jr., DBA, School of Accountancy, University of Southern Mississippi
    moderator:
    Mary L. Fischer, PhD, University of Texas at Tyler
    discussant:
    Aida Sy, PhD, Manhattan College
    presentation session:
    8.27 Performance Measurement and Evaluation
    date:
    August 4, 2010 3:00pm - 4:30pm
    abstract:

    This critical case study structures University’s and AACSB’s diversity standards in the following hypotheses: If the University puts into practice its diversity standard, then its administrators and faculty “cherish the free exchange of ideas, diversity of thought, joint decision making, and individuals’ assumption of responsibility.” If the AACSB puts into practice its diversity standard, then its accredited members “must show that within this (education) context its business programs include diverse viewpoints among participants [and]…[a]ccredited programs must demonstrate commitment and actions in support of diversity in the educational experience.” 

    The antecedents of both hypotheses are demonstrated to be false. Given that the academic institutions fail to support and protect diversity of speech, more centralized and controlling environments are expected to fail to support professionals, including accountants, when they “speak truth to power.” In the current environment, silence should be advised regardless of the calls for ethical behavior.