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  • Pam Rouse
    Visualizing Cash and Accrual Accounting7
    emerging/innovative research session posted August 4, 2011 by Pam Rouse 
    title:
    Visualizing Cash and Accrual Accounting
    author(s), affiliation(s):
    Pamela J. Rouse, Anne S. Kelly, J. Christopher Stump
    date:
    August 10, 2011 9:30am - 11:00am
    session description:

    Research Interaction Forum - Informal discussion of experiential learning tools and its impact on learning.

    abstract:

    One of the key learning objectives for the introductory accounting courses is to understand cash and accrual accounting. Introductory accounting students often stumble when they attempt to distinguish between cash and accrual accounting in
    both the financial and managerial courses. The revenue recognition and the matching principles cause confusion for
    students in financial accounting.  This lack of clarity is apparent when students use financial information to prepare
    a company’s set of financial statements, specifically the Income Statement on the accrual basis and the Statement of Cash Flows.  In managerial accounting, this misunderstanding resurfaces when students are taught budgeting and they are
    asked to prepare the cash budget and the budgeted income statement.  Although the following discussion describes
    some of the issues associated with cash and accrual accounting in both introductory course settings, the teaching example presented here is used primarily in an introductory managerial accounting course.  It specifically combines two experiential learning techniques as supplements to the accounting textbooks so that students can visualize the difference between cash and accrual accounting which enhances their understanding of accrual accounting.

  • Stephanie Dehning Grimm
    A Simulation Study of the Effects of Perceived Risk and...2
    emerging/innovative research session posted August 3, 2011 by Stephanie Dehning Grimm 
    title:
    A Simulation Study of the Effects of Perceived Risk and Information Sharing on the Internal Control Reporting Process
    author(s), affiliation(s):
    Stephanie Grimm and Sheneeta White, University of St. Thomas
    date:
    August 9, 2011 at 01:00am
    abstract:

                The Sarbanes Oxley Act (SOX) mandated the evaluation of internal controls over financial reporting by management and the company’s public auditor. Our simulation study investigates the role of perceived risk and information sharing on the internal control audit process. We interpret various scenarios as corresponding to the Pre-SOX period, SOX implementation year, SOX early years, and SOX later years. We use the regulatory guidance from AS2 and AS5 to motivate how variables of the auditor’s historical relationship with its client, information sharing and perceived risk affect the tasks in the audit process. We also test for the bullwhip effect, an operations phenomenon of over production, and discuss how the effect can be mitigated.

  • Louella J Moore
    Focusing on Paradox in Financial Accounting
    emerging/innovative research session posted August 2, 2011 by Louella J Moore 
    title:
    Focusing on Paradox in Financial Accounting
    author(s), affiliation(s):
    Louella Moore, Arkansas State University
    date:
    August 9, 2011 at 11:45am
    session description:

    Why is it seemingly impossible to prepare a logical Balance Sheet and Income Statement at the same time?  The incorrigibility of allocations and a basic inability to deal with price changes effectively in basic financial statements are known problems or paradoxes that are largely ignored in accounting education, practice, and research.  This is a great lacuna that invites research into the underlying cause of these paradoxes and problems in accounting.

    Could it be that our inability to develop a perfect accounting model based on either a balance sheet/income statement or historical cost/fair value method simply reflects an underlying paradox inherent in the 'reality' or the phenomenal world we are trying to measure?   Come to this session talk about the potential for ideas from Eastern philosophy of nonduality between users and objects (financial statements in this case), physics, and game theory to expand accounting's research models and its understanding of the place of accounting in society.  These models suggest there is much more to be explored in accounting and accountability than the narrow focus of the dominant positive accounting/profit maximization models currently in vogue.

    abstract:

    See uploaded file.