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  • Deirdre Harris
    Frederick D.S. Choi
    memorial posted October 17, 2012 by Deirdre Harris, tagged 2012, memorial 
    colleague's name:
    Frederick D.S. Choi
    photo:
    photo description:
    Frederick D. S. Choi
    memorial:

    It is with deep sadness that the NYU Stern community mourns the loss of Frederick D.S. Choi, Dean Emeritus of the Undergraduate College and a senior member of the Accounting Department. Fred was beloved by students, respected by faculty and cherished by the entire Stern community.  He touched the lives of individual  students and colleagues and his influence on our curriculum and culture will reverberate for generations to come.  Fred¹s passion for students, teaching and scholarship were matched only by his love for his "sweetheart," Lois, his wife of 50 years, his sons, Scott and Aaron, his granddaughters, Marisa and Alexa, and his daughter-in-law Michele.

    Fred joined the faculty in 1981 and made a number of important contributions.  From 1995-2004, he served as Dean of the Undergraduate College.  During his deanship, Fred implemented a new undergraduate curriculum with a focus on the liberal arts, critical thinking, social responsibility, leadership, and global business.  He also introduced several programs that remain hallmarks of the Undergraduate College today, including: the Barr Family International Studies Program in which every junior travels abroad to learn first-hand about differences in cultures and ways of conducting business; the Senior-year Honors Program that involves students in faculty research; and the Cohen Arts and Culture Experience which gives all students a systematic introduction to the arts and culture of New York City.

    Fred was also a star as a teacher and scholar.  He was the Distinguished Service Professor of Business and served as Chairman of the Department of Accounting, Taxation, and Business Law and Director of Stern¹s Vincent C. Ross Institute of Accounting Research. He wrote award-winning books and published articles in journals such as The Journal of Accounting Research, The Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, The Financial Analysts Journal, The Journal of Accountancy, and The Journal of International Business Studies.  Fred was invited to lecture at a wide range of institutions around the world and served as a member of the First American Visiting Team to establish the National Center for Industrial Science and Technology Management Development in the People¹s Republic of China. He taught thousands of executives the essentials of international reporting and analysis in Europe, Latin America, Asia and the U.S., most notably on Wall Street.

    Fred was a recipient of the Citibank Excellence in Teaching Award, a recipient of the American Accounting Association¹s Outstanding International Accounting Educator Award and was the first academician appointed to the Board of Trustees of the Financial Executives Research Foundation. Fred was also a member of the American  Accounting Association, the Academy of International Business, Financial Executives Institute, Phi Kappa Phi, Beta Gamma Sigma and Beta Alpha Psi.  He was the founding editor of The Journal of International Financial Management and Accounting.

    In 2010-2011, Fred served as Interim Dean of the Undergraduate College. During that year I experienced first-hand the wonderful qualities that endeared Fred to legions of students and colleagues.  As our weekly meetings evolved into tutorials in which Fred generously shared of his wisdom and experience, I came to understand just why he was so beloved.

    And as much as I valued Fred¹s guidance, it is his kindness and friendship that resonate with me most deeply, even as I write this message.  Halfway through our year together, Fred gave me a silver NYU Torch, and I have worn it on my lapel ever since.  Scholar, leader, teacher, friend, husband, father, and grandfather we will miss this marvelous man, but Fred Choi¹s legacy burns brightly for all to see.

    --Peter Henry

  • Deirdre Harris
    William Leonard Ferrara 1930-2012
    memorial posted October 17, 2012 by Deirdre Harris, tagged 2012, memorial 
    colleague's name:
    William Leonard Ferrara 1930-2012
    dates:
    September 5, 1930 - October 14, 2012
    photo:
    photo description:
    William Leonard Ferrara
    memorial:

     

    William Leonard Ferrara was born on September 5, 1930 in Chicago, Illinois and died on October 14, 2012 in Danville, Pennsylvania after heart surgery.

    He was a graduate of DePaul University, Chicago, with a bachelor's degree in Accounting and Michigan State University, with master's and doctorate degrees. He was also a CPA. As an educator he taught accounting-related subjects at Penn State, retiring as Professor Emeritus after 27 years and Stetson University, retiring as Professor Emeritus after 10 years.

    He received the "Distinguished Achievement  Award" from the DePaul University Alumni Association; the Beta Alpha Psi "Outstanding Alumnus Award" from Michigan State University; six MBA "Excellence in Teaching Awards", an "Outstanding Advisor Award", and a "Faculty Humanitarian Award" at Penn State; a "Golden Apple Award" and a "Perfect Five Award" at Stetson; a "Distinguished Service Award for Educators" from the Institute of Management Accountants; seven "merit awards" plus a "bronze medal" for manuscripts published by the Institute of Management Accountants. He published papers in The Accounting Review dealing with relevant costing, period costs, and idle capacity costs.

    He served the Institute of Management Accountants as a member of its National Executive Committee, as a National Vice President, as Chair of its National Committees on Education and Public Relations plus as a member of its Board of Regents, responsible for the CMA Examination; The American Accounting Association as a member of Council, President of its Management Accounting Section, Editor of the Journal of Management Accounting Research and Chair of its Advisory Committee to the Director of Education and Committee on CPA Examinations; and the American Institute of CPAs as a member of its Educator's Advisory Committee and its Board of Examiners, responsible for the CPA Examination.

    In 1996 he served as the American Accounting Association's Distinguished International Visiting Lecturer and spoke to and visited with students, faculty and practitioners at universities throughout South Africa. In 2007 he was awarded the Lifetime Contribution to Management Accounting Award by the Management Accounting Section of the American Accounting Association.

    He is survived by his wife, Carol, seven children, Stephen, Paul, Janeen, Cynthia, William, Irene, and Joseph; and, fifteen grandchildren.

     

  • Deirdre Harris
    William Wager Cooper 1914-20121
    memorial posted June 25, 2012 by Deirdre Harris, tagged 2012, memorial 
    colleague's name:
    William Wager Cooper 1914-2012
    dates:
    1914-2012
    photo:
    memorial:
    William W. Cooper was born on July 23, 1914 in Birmingham, Alabama and died on June 20, 2012 in Austin, Texas.  He grew up in a rough neighborhood in Chicago. After his father became ill, he had to drop out of high school to support his family, and he worked at a variety of odd jobs, including as a professional boxer.  His record:  58 wins, 3 losses, and 2 draws. 
     
    Eric L. Kohler, an Arthur Andersen & Co. partner who taught accounting at Northwestern University, picked Bill up as a hitch-hiker one day on his way to another of his jobs, as a golf caddie.  Kohler soon became his mentor and friend, and he loaned him the money to enter the University of Chicago.  While at the university, he became friends with fellow student Herbert A. Simon. In 1938, he received an A.B. degree, majoring in economics, and he then accompanied Kohler to the Tennessee Valley Authority, where Kohler served as Comptroller. Bill assisted him by applying his analytical skills to developing the TVA’s required auditing systems and procedures.
     
    In 1940, Bill entered the Ph.D. program in business at Columbia University. After completing the coursework in two years, his research was so advanced for its day that his thesis committee could not judge, and would not approve, his thesis.  As Bill later said, he “fought the committee to a draw.”  In 1942, Bill again followed Kohler, this time to U.S. Bureau of the Budget to help with the war effort, where he was put in charge of all the government’s accounting-related statistics.   
     
    In May 1944, he met Ruth, his future wife, in Washington, DC.
     
    After a brief return to the University of Chicago, Bill joined the Carnegie Institute of Technology (today Carnegie Mellon University) in 1946.  Together with George Leland (Lee) Bach and Herbert Simon, he was one of the founding fathers of Carnegie Tech’s Graduate School of Industrial Administration (now the Tepper School of Business).  They pioneered a scientific, interdisciplinary approach to business education, eventually with Ford Foundation support, that is now the norm in leading business schools, and their effort was a key intellectual driver in the development of CMU. 
    From the outset, Bill espoused the need for problem-driven research.  Together with long-term collaborator Abraham Charnes, he developed important new mathematical techniques (for example, goal programming, chance-constrained programming, and data envelopment analysis) in the search of solutions to particular applied problems. Their work created a new field, called management science, and Bill was the founding president of The Institute of Management Sciences (which is now part of the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences).  In 1968, he became the first dean of CMU’s School of Urban and Public Affairs (now Heinz College). 
     
    From 1975 to 1980, he was the Arthur Lowes Dickinson Professor at the Harvard Business School, where he developed and supervised an improved Ph.D. program.  In 1980, George Kozmetsky, the dean of the business school at the University of Texas at Austin, hired Bill as the Foster Parker Professor of Management, Finance and Accounting, thus bridging three departments. He became emeritus in 1993. Throughout his career, he advised numerous Ph.D. students, including Andrew Stedry, Andrew Whinston, and Yuji Ijiri at Carnegie Mellon, Rajiv Banker at Harvard, and Ramayya Krishna at UT-Austin.
     
    Bill was an immensely prolific researcher, even in the last years of his life.  Of his more than 545 scientific publications, 35 were in accounting and auditing.  In 1981, he became the founding editor of the Auditing Section’s new journal, Auditing: A Journal of Practice & Theory.  In 1988, the Section gave him its distinguished service award.  In 1985, he was one of the influential voices behind the founding of Accounting Horizons. In 1986, he served as the AAA’s Distinguished International Visiting Professor in Latin America. He received the AAA’s Outstanding Accounting Educator Award in 1990, and in 1995 he was inducted into the Accounting Hall of Fame.
     
    Bill received numerous other awards for his research and academic leadership, including the esteemed John von Neumann Theory Prize in 1982, together with Charnes and Richard Duffin.
     
    Together with Ijiri, in 1979 Bill edited a collection of papers in honor of his mentor: Eric Louis Kohler: Accounting’s Man of Principles. Also together with Ijiri, in 1983 he compiled and edited the sixth edition of Kohler’s Dictionary for Accountants.
     
    Bill had a wide expanse of knowledge, and he could talk intelligently on any subject raised in conversation, whether in science, the arts, philosophy, sports, business, or politics. And he always made others feel as if they were on his level.  He cared intensely about people and ideas, and he was always in search of ways to improve the human condition.
     
    Until the last weeks of his life, Bill would come to the office every day to pursue his research.
     
    His wife Ruth, a lawyer and advocate of human rights, died in 2000 after 55 years of marriage. He is survived by his brother Leon and his sister Emilie.  In addition, he leaves behind numerous former students and colleagues who came to regard Bill and Ruth Cooper as their godparents.
     

    --Jonathan C. Glover

    --Yuji Ijiri

    --Stephen A. Zeff

  • Deirdre Harris
    Edgar Owen Edwards - 1919-2010
    memorial posted June 11, 2012 by Deirdre Harris, tagged 2010, memorial 
    colleague's name:
    Edgar Owen Edwards - 1919-2010
    memorial:

    Edgar O. Edwards, a longtime economics and accounting educator at Rice University, died June 5, 2010 in Poultney, Vermont, where he and his wife Jean lived in retirement.

    Ed is best known to the accounting world as the author together with Philip W. Bell of the highly influential treatise, The Theory and Measurement of Business Income, which was published in 1961 by the University of California Press. In 2003, both he and Bell were inducted into the Accounting Hall of Fame.

    In 1951, Ed obtained a Ph.D. in political economy from Johns Hopkins University. He then served on the Princeton University economics faculty until 1959, when he became the Hargrove Professor of Economics and Chairman of the Department at Rice University. From 1978 to 1983, when he retired from Rice, he taught accounting seminars in the Jesse H. Jones Graduate School of Administration.

    Prior to the War, he had worked for a furniture company, where he dealt with costs as a basis for pricing, which, he said, raised questions about the relevance of historical cost depreciation. While at Princeton, he taught a night school course in accounting. Among the other sources of accounting influence were Sidney Davidson, an assistant professor at Johns Hopkins, and Stanley E. Howard, who lectured on accounting and corporate finance at Princeton.

    Between 1963 and 1978, during various leaves, he worked for the Ford Foundation as an economic adviser and planner for both Kenya and its Asia and Pacific Program. During one period, he was senior economic adviser to Kenya’s Ministry of Finance and Planning. He also served as an economic adviser to the governments of Botswana and Lebanon.

    He wrote more than 20 articles on economic theory, development planning, and accounting. In addition, he was author or editor of more than a dozen books and monographs, including a textbook, Accounting for Economic Events, with Bell and L. Todd Johnson.

    In addition to Jean, he leaves three children: Kathryn, Carolyn, and Douglas.

  • Deirdre Harris
    Gordon Shillinglaw - 1925-2012
    memorial posted April 16, 2012 by Deirdre Harris, tagged 2012, memorial 
    colleague's name:
    Gordon Shillinglaw - 1925-2012
    dates:
    July 26, 1925 - March 31, 2012
    memorial:

    Gordon Shillinglaw was born in Albany, N.Y. on July 26, 1925 and died on March 31, 2012, following a long battle with cancer. He obtained an A.B. in naval sciences from Brown University in 1945 and then served with the U.S. Navy in the Pacific. He then obtained an M.S. in business administration from the University of Rochester in 1948 and a Ph.D. in economics from Harvard University in 1952. He taught at Harvard from 1949 to 1951, Hamilton College from 1951 to 1952, Massachusetts Institute of Technology from 1955 to 1961, and Columbia University from 1961 until becoming professor emeritus in 1990.

    From 1952 to 1955, he worked with Joel Dean Associates, a management consulting firm in New York City. Joel Dean, a Ph.D. from the University of Chicago, was one of the pioneers in capital budgeting analysis and in applying economics to management decision making. Gordon claimed that he originated the term “discounted cash flow” while at the firm, and said that he first used the term in an article in the Journal of Business in 1955.

    Gordon taught at IMEDE in Lausanne, Switzerland in 1964-65 and 1967-69.

    In 1961, he brought out the textbook, Cost Accounting: Analysis and Control, which, unlike cost accounting books then in print, was concerned with the management uses of cost accounting. The book was published in five editions. In 1964, he and Myron J. Gordon became the coauthors of an innovative textbook, Accounting: A Management Approach, then the third edition of a textbook launched in 1951 by three MIT professors, which Shillinglaw took to a ninth edition with coauthors. Gordon was also the author of numerous journal articles and several chapters in handbooks.

    He was vice-president of the American Accounting Association in 1966-67. In 1991, he was inducted into the Hall of Fame of the AAA’s Northeast Region. He served on the Cost Accounting Standards Board from 1978 to 1980.

    He is succeeded by his wife Barbara, two children, James and Laura, and four grandchildren.

    -- Stephen A. Zeff

  • Deirdre Harris
    Charles Thomas Horngren - 1926-2011
    memorial posted October 26, 2011 by Deirdre Harris, tagged memorial 
    colleague's name:
    Charles Thomas Horngren - 1926-2011
    dates:
    1926-2011
    photo:
    memorial:

    Charles T. Horngren was born in a blue collar neighborhood of Milwaukee on October 28, 1926, and he died in Palo Alto on October 23, 2011. He grew up an avid baseball fan and for a while wanted to become a major league player until reality set in. Following high school graduation, he entered the U.S. Army. In 1946, he enrolled at Marquette University, where he majored in accounting. In his junior year, he took a part-time position with the Veterans Administration to tutor homebound, disabled veterans. After graduating as class valedictorian in 1949 with a B.S. degree, he worked in public accounting. Yet he soon opted instead to teach a heavy load of accounting courses at a for-profit business college, where he discovered that he loved teaching. In 1950, he entered the M.B.A. program at Harvard Business School. There he focused on decision making by general management and developed a better appreciation of accounting as a decision-making tool.

    In 1952, the University of Chicago offered him a teaching position in accounting if he would also enroll in the Ph.D. program. At Chicago, William J. Vatter became his mentor and was a stimulating influence in broadening and deepening his interests and conceptual skills.

    After receiving his Ph.D. in only three years while teaching full-time, he taught for a year at Marquette and for three years at the new University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. In 1959, he returned to a tenured accounting position on the University of Chicago’s accounting faculty. It was an exciting time at Chicago—with colleagues Sidney Davidson, Nicholas Dopuch, David Green, and George Sorter, the founding of the Journal of Accounting Research, outstanding doctoral students (the likes of Joel Demski, William Beaver and Philip Brown), and the stimulus of the pioneering theoretical and empirical research by colleagues in finance.

    Chuck was lured to Stanford in 1966, where he remained until his retirement 30 years later. There he helped recruit Demski and Beaver and, together with Bob Jaedicke, played a major role in building the Stanford accounting faculty into one of the leading centers of research and teaching, all within a business school that was becoming a world leader under Deans Ernest Arbuckle and Arjay Miller.

    True to Vatter’s influence, Chuck made major contributions in both financial and management accounting. In the former, he wrote a number of thoughtful articles, including three with Sorter on “relevant costing.” He played key roles in helping to shape the development of private-sector standard setting by serving on the Accounting Principles Board from 1968 to 1973. Among his more influential articles were several in the 1970s and the 1980s on the efficacy of the standard-setting process. He served as a trustee of the Financial Accounting Foundation, which oversees the Financial Accounting Standards Board, from 1984 to 1989.

    As significant as his mark was on the world of financial accounting, Chuck’s biggest imprint was on management accounting. Influenced by Vatter’s path-breaking textbook, Managerial Accounting, published as a “preliminary edition” in 1950, he brought out his own Cost Accounting: A Managerial Emphasis in 1962. Almost by itself, his textbook changed the field. His objective was to demonstrate to faculty and students alike how the most important role of accounting within a company was as a management tool for making wiser decisions. Prior to the 1960s, cost accounting textbooks had placed primary emphasis on the construction of inventory cost for use in financial statements and only secondarily conceded space to the management uses of accounting. Chuck’s book soon became one of the most respected and widely used textbooks in the field, used throughout the world, and is currently in its 14th edition with coauthors Srikant Datar and Madhav Rajan.

    He was the author of several other textbooks on financial and management accounting that continue to be published with coauthors in their later editions. In addition, he wrote more than 50 articles on a wide range of accounting topics.

    Chuck was long active in the American Accounting Association, serving as its Research Director in 1965-66 and President in 1976-77. He has won numerous awards and accolades. In 1973, he received the AAA’s inaugural Outstanding Accounting Educator Award, and in 1990 he was inducted into the Accounting Hall of Fame.

    Chuck Horngren exerted leadership in a self-effacing, soft-spoken manner, with quiet dignity, but always with an unmistakable accent on the highest standard of performance coupled with a progressive spirit. He was an excellent writer and a captivating teacher.

    He and Joan, whom Chuck called his “balance wheel,” were married in September 1952. They had four children. Chuck and Joan endowed professorships at Stanford and Marquette Universities. Joan died at the age of 80 on May 3, 2010.

    --Stephen A. Zeff

  • John M Hassell
    Richard L. Rogers - 1949-2011
    memorial posted August 16, 2011 by John M Hassell, tagged memorial 
    colleague's name:
    Richard L. Rogers - 1949-2011
    photo:
    photo description:
    Richard L. Rogers
    memorial:

    Richard L. Rogers

    Associate Professor of Accounting

    Kelley School of Business Indianapolis


    Professor Richard L. Rogers, Professor of Accounting for the Kelley School of Business the past 30 years, died peacefully in his home August 2, 2011. He was 61 years old. Rich was born December 8, 1949, the son of Edwin and Mary H. Rogers.


    Rich had a strong commitment to education. He earned his B.S. from Rider University (1974), M.B.A. from Lehigh University (1977), and his Ph.D from Penn State University (1981).

    Rich started his academic career with Indiana University at the Kelley School of Business Bloomington, and five years later he transferred to Kelley Indianapolis. Never leaving the IU family, Rich loved and excelled in both in-class learning and online teaching. Earning the respect of his colleagues, peers, and students, Rich received many teaching awards for undergraduate, graduate, and distance education teaching. 


    Colleagues who worked closely with Rich over the past 30 years described him as the consummate “professional educator” who had an immense impact on the growth of the Kelley Indianapolis accounting programs. He also helped launch the Kelley Direct online MBA program and continually sought to enhance course offerings to students.

    Rich is survived by his mother Mary H. Rogers, wife Teggie Rogers, sister Nancy and her husband Edward Lawrence, son David and his wife McKenze, and daughter Becky. Rich loved traveling with his family - from Cincinnati to catch a Reds Game to Amsterdam to admire the Van Gogh Museum. Enjoying company, conversation, and learning from all, he was a true family man in his professional and personal life. Friends describe him as the kindest, gentlest, and warmest of men.

  • Deirdre Harris
    Alvin A. Arens - 1935-2010
    memorial posted December 10, 2010 by Deirdre Harris, tagged 2010, memorial 
    colleague's name:
    Alvin A. Arens - 1935-2010
    dates:
    November 24, 1935 - December 6, 2010
    photo:
    memorial:

    Alvin A. Arens passed away on December 6, 2010 at the age of 75. Al was born on November 24, 1935 in Marshall, MN to the late Clarence and Marie (Verdeck) Arens. After graduating from Marshall High School he went on to serve in the US Army for two years. Al graduated from the University of Minnesota with a B.B.A in Accounting and went on to work with CPA firms Ernst & Ernst and Boulay, Anderson, Waldo, & Company for four years before continuing his education and getting a PhD. He went on to teach for 38 years at Michigan State University. While there, he co-authored an Auditing text book, developed and grew AHI, a continuing education training program for CPA firms, coauthored and published a systems understanding aid for auditing programs for college students, and published countless articles that covered accounting and auditing practices and standards. He also received a PricewaterhouseCoopers Professorship, Educator of the Year from the AICPA, served as Department Chair, was a former President of the American Accounting Association, and was recognized for his leadership, teaching, and dedication to the profession of accounting.

    Al enjoyed being a member of the Okemos Community Church and Kiwanis. He participated and led troop 125 when his boys were young and enjoyed supporting his wife in her MSU Faculty Folk interest groups and artistic endeavors. He spent countless hours enjoying MSU sports and travel with friends and family. Al and his wife, Irene, have supported the MSU community through contributions to the Spartan Fund, Scholarships, and Department of Accounting.

    Al is survived by his wife of 50 years, Irene; sons, John and Scott (JoAnne); daughter, Linda; siblings, Loyal (Dorothy), Eleanor, Margaret (John); grandchildren, Kelsey, Jacob, Karina, Victoria; and many loving nieces and nephews. A Memorial Service will be held Saturday, December 11, 2010 at 4:00 p.m., at the Okemos Community Church. The immediate family will receive friends one hour prior to the service at the church. In lieu of flowers, memorials can be made to the Michigan State University Development Fund,"Al Arens Teaching Excellence Fund", 300 Spartan Way, East Lansing, MI 48824; Okemos Community Church Building Renovation Fund, 4734 Okemos Rd, P.O. Box 680, Okemos, MI 48805 or Sparrow Hospice, C/O Sparrow Foundation, P.O. Box 30480, Lansing, MI 48909. On-line condolences may be made to http://www.legacy.com/guestbook/lsj/guestbook.aspx?n=alvin-arens&pid=147000534.

  • Deirdre Harris
    Robert Raymond Sterling - 1931-2010
    memorial posted August 30, 2010 by Deirdre Harris, tagged 2010, memorial 
    colleague's name:
    Robert Raymond Sterling - 1931-2010
    dates:
    1931-2010
    memorial:

    Robert Raymond Sterling had recently celebrated his 79th birthday. He was born in Bugtussle, Oklahoma, on May 16, 1931. Bob was one of those remarkable people who were born into a family that experienced genuine hardship and need – but who, by personal determination, resilience and sheer hard work triumphed over adversity to become a person of distinction, achievement and influence. Bob earned two degrees from the University of Denver – a BS in Economics and an MBA – and was awarded his PhD from the University of Florida in 1964, with a major field in Economics which was a pathway in his study for accountants at that time.

    In 1967, he was appointed to the faculty at the University of Kansas, was promoted to full professor in 1969, and named Arthur Young Distinguished Professor of Accounting in 1970. Four years later he was appointed as Jesse H. Jones Distinguished Professor of Management at Rice University, later becoming the founding dean of the then Jones Graduate School of Administration (now Business) at Rice. Following a visiting professorial appointment at the University of Alberta, Bob was engaged as Senior Research Fellow at the Financial Accounting Standards Board from 1981-83. In 1983, he was appointed as the Kendall D. Garff Distinguished Professor of Business Enterprise at the University of Utah – and, as he often quipped, as an Undistinguished Professor of Accounting. Bob remained at Utah until his retirement in 1991.

    Bob’s PhD dissertation was published as “Theory of the Measurement of Enterprise Income” by the
    University Press of Kansas in 1970. It remains one of the few truly great theoretical works in accounting. His second was titled “Toward a Science of Accounting,” published by Scholars Books, in 1980. Both works are accounting classics. Bob was twice awarded an AICPA gold medal, designated a Fellow by the National Science Foundation, appointed as the first Distinguished International Lecturer in Accounting from the USA by the American Accounting Association, and inducted into the Accounting Hall of Fame at The Ohio State University. Sterling is survived by his wife Ley, his former wife and friend Margery, son Robert II, daughter Kimberly, and grandsons Robert III and Travis.

    --Peter W. Wolnizer, University of Sydney

  • Deirdre Harris
    John Wilson Dickhaut, Jr. - 1942-2010
    memorial posted August 30, 2010 by Deirdre Harris, tagged 2010, memorial 
    colleague's name:
    John Wilson Dickhaut, Jr. - 1942-2010
    dates:
    1942-2010
    memorial:

    John Dickhaut passed away April 10, 2010 at his California home following a long and courageous battle with cancer. John was a widely respected member of the accounting and economics academic communities. At the time of his death, he was the Jerrold A. Glass Endowed Chair in Accounting and Economics at Chapman University. He was also the Emeritus Curtis L. Carlson Land Grant Chair in Accounting Professor at the University of Minnesota where he had served on the faculty from 1976 to 2008.

    John W. Dickhaut, Jr. was born on February 10, 1942. He was the son of John W. and Margaret S. Dickhaut and brother of Robert Dickhaut. John’s father was a Methodist minister and founder and President of the Methodist Theological School in Ohio. He loved his father’s spontaneous, “corny” sense of humor, admired his mother’s determination and ability to fully immerse herself in every moment of life, and marveled at his brother’s voracious appetite for books.

    He grew up in Columbus, Ohio, and received a B.A. in English Literature from Duke University in 1964. Upon graduation, he returned to Columbus where he entered a Master’s program in accounting at the Ohio State University. He received his Master’s degree in 1966, but along the way was encouraged by Professor Thomas Burns to seek a PhD. He received his PhD from Ohio State in 1970 and took his first faculty position at the University of Chicago.

    John’s early research was in the traditional accounting domain. His dissertation paper won the AAA’s Manuscript Contest and was published in the January 1973 issue of The Accounting Review. This paper was among the earliest attempts in the accounting literature to use experimental methods. Several papers followed in the Journal of Accounting Research and other accounting outlets over the first part of his career.

    After 1980, John’s research broadened when his interests shifted into experimental economics. He made fundamental contributions that fostered understanding of human risk preferences and trust in economic interaction. His work included studies using agent-based models to study market phenomena, and he was an early pioneer in “neuroeconomics,” an emergent area that studies the relation between the human brain and economic choice. This research was published in leading academic journals such as Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States (PNAS), Games and Economic Behavior, Quarterly Journal of Economics, and Management Science.

    Among John’s papers are classic studies that have had and will continue to have a major impact. His 1995 paper in Games and Economic Behavior with Joyce Berg and Kevin McCabe on the “trust game” has been cited over a thousand times and been replicated in hundreds of studies. His 2005 PNAS paper on risk preference instability (also with Berg and McCabe) was highlighted by the editors of Science magazine in its “Editor’s Choice” column of March 25, 2005. His recent work in PNAS (December 29, 2009) with Aldo Rustichini and Vernon Smith offers a comprehensive theory of economic choice that seeks to simultaneously explain data observed in behavioral choices and physiological measurement of activity within the brain. John’s recent move back to basic accounting issues is an attempt to reconcile what we know about the brain with how accounting has been shaped (see “The Brain as the Original Accounting Institution,” The Accounting Review, November 2009).

    It might seem surprising that John would begin in academic accounting, but end up doing basic research in neuroscience. But, John was forward-looking and he may have intended that the human brain would be his ultimate research destination. I was at Chapman when John passed away, and a few days later came across a book in his office entitled Signal Detection Theory and Psychophysics, by Green and Swets. He had checked out this book from Regenstein Library at the University of Chicago on October 10, 1972, but had never returned it. I became curious as to whether he had cited it directly in any of his papers. (Most likely, he acquired this book while working on a study with Ian Eggleton on human processing of quantitative data published in the Journal of Accounting Research in Spring 1975.) I found only one direct citation for the Green and Swets book: the 2009 PNAS paper with Rustichini and Smith that used signal detection theory as a foundation for their neuronal-based theory of economic choice.

    John Dickhaut had a profound influence on a generation of graduate students and faculty colleagues. Students where he served as a dissertation chair or committee member (not to mention co-author) include Joyce Berg, Robert Bushman, Carol Eger, Steve Gjerstad, Todd Kaplan, Meg Ledyard, Radhika Lunawat, John O’Brien, Haresh Sapra, Tim Shields, Jack Stecher, and Baohua Xing. These individuals learned much about conducting research, and they directly observed how research could be great fun. Colleagues from Chapman, Minnesota, and other universities can regale others with “Dickhaut stories.” These might recount a heated debate in a workshop, how he worked for hours with a co-author to get every last detail right on a paper, or how he wore his “Goofy” slippers through the halls of academia while singing a favorite song at a volume that everyone within a half mile radius could hear.

    His final institutional love was for the Economic Science Institute at Chapman University. ESI, founded by economist Vernon Smith along with John, Dave Porter, Steve Rassenti, and Bart Wilson, is a unique group dedicated to the use of scientific experimentation to discover fundamental aspects of human economic behavior. The working partnership of these scholars was something that John felt very strongly about. He had found a new home at Chapman, and that was evident when he was gave the first Lectio Magistralis there in November 2008 (video available online at http://www.chapman.edu/CHANCELLOR/lectioMag.asp#archives).

    Colleagues, students, and friends will remember John Dickhaut as a genius who brimmed with enthusiasm for life, humor, and intellectual intensity. His research work had continued through several rounds of cancer treatment that spanned a decade. His passion for life and the “life of the mind” was apparent up to his final moments. The final time I spoke with John was on the evening before he died (I had been at Chapman to present a seminar earlier that day on a paper we are writing). Our conversation, like all of our talks, focused on what we wanted to accomplish in the future with this paper and the others we had planned. It brought a huge smile to my face when a few days later I discovered the following entry that John had written in his personal journal on January 7, 1985:

    “Suppose I say – tomorrow is the last day of my life. The trick is to feel it. Not to be afraid. I feel more alert. More awake.

    I will be planning in the last day of my life. The plans will be immense ones. I will die with a vision. I will be envisioning when I die. I will be looking forward. I will have created a number of alternatives, all relating to my life structure.”

    John Dickhaut was a loving and generous man. He touched us. He inspired us to be better. He lives within us because he came closer than anyone to living every day as if it were his final one.  

    John is survived by his loving friend and wife, Sheri, his brother, Robert Dickhaut, Bob’s wife, Veronique, and John’s niece, Charlotte, and nephew, Jason, an undergraduate student at the University of Chicago.

    Gregory Waymire

    Atlanta, Georgia

    June 7, 2010