News About Colleagues

from the news room

This is a public Custom Hive  public

Posts

  • Nancy Maciag
    George Roudebush Catlett 1917-2013
    memorial posted June 5, 2014 by Nancy Maciag 
    colleague's name:
    George Roudebush Catlett 1917-2013
    dates:
    1917-2013
    memorial:

    George Roudebush Catlett (1917-2013)

    George R. Catlett, the senior technical partner of Arthur Andersen & Co. from 1962 to 1980, died on October 10, 2013 in Pewaukee, Wisconsin. He was born on August 14, 1917 in Fairmount, Illinois, where he grew up. He received B.S. and M.S. degrees in accounting from the University of Illinois and was hired in 1940 by Arthur E. Andersen to join his firm in its Chicago office. He did procurement work for the Army Ordnance Corps from 1942 to 1946, becoming a major. He rejoined Arthur Andersen & Co. as a manager, and, after Andersen died in 1947, Leonard Spacek succeeded him as managing partner. 

    Catlett became a partner in 1952. He served in the firm’s St. Louis office from 1953 to 1958, following which he returned to the Chicago home office and in 1962 was elected chairman of the firm’s committee on accounting principles and auditing procedures. He became Spacek’s right hand, drafting his speeches, but he also spoke and wrote extensively himself. His long tenure as chairman of the committee ended in 1980, when he retired from the firm.

    With partner Norman O. Olson, he wrote Accounting for Goodwill, which was Accounting Research Study No. 10 sponsored by the Accounting Principles Board (APB) in 1968. In 1973, Arthur Andersen & Co. published a collection of Catlett’s and Olson’s speeches and articles under the title, In Pursuit of Professional Goals: Addresses and Articles 1960-1972.

    In 1965, Catlett succeeded Spacek on the APB and was as one of the most active members of the board until he stepped down in 1971, having served when the board issued most of its significant pronouncements. He was APB vice-chairman from 1968 to 1971.  He was the lone dissenter in 1970 to APB Statement No. 4 on accounting principles, because he believed that the determination of what should be the objectives of accounting was an urgent matter that had not been settled in the Statement. He dissented to APB Opinion No. 17 on intangible assets, because he, like Spacek, believed that goodwill should be deducted from stockholders’ equity. He would have dissented to Opinion No. 16 on business combinations, also issued in 1970, but for the fact that his negative vote would have scuttled the Opinion, and the board had agreed that both Opinions had to be approved else the SEC would have issued regulations.

    Ever the gentleman, Catlett could disagree without being disagreeable. He staunchly supported Spacek’s crusade to rid GAAP of optional treatments and to establish the objectives of financial accounting.

    He was president of the Illinois Society of Certified Public Accountants in 1966-67 and was vice-president of the AICPA in 1976-77. 

    In 1982, he published a book on the Catlett families in Virginia and Illinois.

    He married Martha Jane Beamsley in 1944. He is survived by four sons, their children, and a sister. His wife died in 2007.

    - Stephen A. Zeff

  • Deirdre Harris
    Gordon Shillinglaw - 1925-2012
    memorial posted April 16, 2012 by Deirdre Harris, tagged 2012, memorial 
    colleague's name:
    Gordon Shillinglaw - 1925-2012
    dates:
    July 26, 1925 - March 31, 2012
    memorial:

    Gordon Shillinglaw was born in Albany, N.Y. on July 26, 1925 and died on March 31, 2012, following a long battle with cancer. He obtained an A.B. in naval sciences from Brown University in 1945 and then served with the U.S. Navy in the Pacific. He then obtained an M.S. in business administration from the University of Rochester in 1948 and a Ph.D. in economics from Harvard University in 1952. He taught at Harvard from 1949 to 1951, Hamilton College from 1951 to 1952, Massachusetts Institute of Technology from 1955 to 1961, and Columbia University from 1961 until becoming professor emeritus in 1990.

    From 1952 to 1955, he worked with Joel Dean Associates, a management consulting firm in New York City. Joel Dean, a Ph.D. from the University of Chicago, was one of the pioneers in capital budgeting analysis and in applying economics to management decision making. Gordon claimed that he originated the term “discounted cash flow” while at the firm, and said that he first used the term in an article in the Journal of Business in 1955.

    Gordon taught at IMEDE in Lausanne, Switzerland in 1964-65 and 1967-69.

    In 1961, he brought out the textbook, Cost Accounting: Analysis and Control, which, unlike cost accounting books then in print, was concerned with the management uses of cost accounting. The book was published in five editions. In 1964, he and Myron J. Gordon became the coauthors of an innovative textbook, Accounting: A Management Approach, then the third edition of a textbook launched in 1951 by three MIT professors, which Shillinglaw took to a ninth edition with coauthors. Gordon was also the author of numerous journal articles and several chapters in handbooks.

    He was vice-president of the American Accounting Association in 1966-67. In 1991, he was inducted into the Hall of Fame of the AAA’s Northeast Region. He served on the Cost Accounting Standards Board from 1978 to 1980.

    He is succeeded by his wife Barbara, two children, James and Laura, and four grandchildren.

    -- Stephen A. Zeff

  • Judy Cothern
    Herbert Elmer Miller 1914-2012
    memorial posted January 9, 2013 by Judy Cothern, tagged memorial 
    colleague's name:
    Herbert Elmer Miller 1914-2012
    dates:
    August 11, 1914 — December 21, 2012
    memorial:

    Herbert E. Miller was born on August 11, 1914 in DeWitt, Iowa. He died in Athens, Georgia on December 21, 2012 following a long illness. Herb received an A.B. in 1936 and an M.A. in 1937 from the University of Iowa and then received a Ph.D. in 1944 from the University of Minnesota. He served on the accounting faculties of Simpson College (1937-38), the University of Minnesota (1938-44), the University of Iowa (1945), the University of Michigan (1946-61), and Michigan State University (1961-70) prior to becoming a partner in Arthur Andersen & Co., where he proceeded to lead a movement to establish and gain accreditation for schools of accounting. In 1978, upon reaching the mandatory retirement age at the firm, he joined the University of Georgia as the first director of its J. M. Tull School of Accounting. He retired from the university in 1983. The School created an accounting chair in his name in 1988. 

    more:

     

    Herb wrote numerous articles in professional and academic journals but was known mainly for his textbooks. Beginning in 1951, he joined H. A. Finney as coauthor of the three volumes of Finney’s Principles of Accounting textbooks: introductory, intermediate and advanced. They were, during the 1950s and the 1960s, the best-known and most widely used series of accounting principles textbooks in U.S. college and university accounting programs. He also edited three editions of C.P.A. Review Manual from 1951 to 1966 and in 1972 with George C. Mead.

    He chaired the AAA’s special committee to formulate a revision of its accounting principles statement in 1948. He served as the AAA’s vice-president in 1957 and president in 1965-66. As president, he arranged with Prentice-Hall, Inc., the publisher of his textbooks, to publish the AAA’s 50-year history at no cost to the Association.  He was the last living member of the AICPA’s Committee on Accounting Procedure, on which he served from 1956 to 1959, and he was also a member of the AICPA’s Accounting Principles Board from 1959 to 1963.

    In 1961-62, he was national president of Beta Alpha Psi, and he served as president in 1981 of the Federation of School of Accountancy. He was a member of AICPA’s Council in 1966-69 and of its Board of Directors in 1967-70.

    Herb received the AAA’s Outstanding Accounting Educator Award in 1977, Beta Alpha Psi’s Accountant of the Year Award in 1978, and the AICPA’s Gold Medal Award in 1981. In 1982, he was inducted into the Accounting Hall of Fame.

    Herb was a passionate fan of auto racing and attended competitions all over the country.

    On July 1, 1938, he married Mary Lenore Snitkey, known to all as Lenore. She died on June 11, 2011. They leave one daughter, Barbara Clemmons.

    Herb, who was a doctoral supervisor and close personal friend of the writer, touched the lives of many of today’s accounting academics. Never one to vaunt his achievements, he had a prodigious career as an educator, textbook author, standard setter, and leader of the accounting profession.

    [Courtesy of Stephen A. Zeff]

  • Judy Cothern
    Ian Hague - 1961 - 2010
    memorial posted July 14, 2010 by Judy Cothern, tagged memorial 
    colleague's name:
    Ian Hague - 1961 - 2010
    dates:
    1961 - 2010
    memorial:

    IAN PHILIP NEIL HAGUE 1961 ¬ 2010 Embraced by his family, Ian passed away peacefully on Thursday, July 1, 2010 after a brief battle with cancer. He is the loving husband of Donna Sharp of Toronto, and devoted and proud father of Bryan Hague with many relatives of the Sharp / Hamilton families from the Ottawa area. Raised in England, he is the beloved son of Philip and Sylvia Hague of Eastbourne Sussex, brother of Malcolm Hague and uncle of Scott and Katy of Berkshire England. A global accountant, dedicated hockey and soccer coach (Hillcrest North York Association), who enjoyed gardening and the outdoors, Ian lived life to the fullest. His passion for travel extended to his career in accountancy, which began in England and for the past decade focused on Canadian and international standard setting. For more than seventeen years, Ian worked at the Canadian Institute of Chartered Accountants. He was a frequent speaker at conferences in Canada and internationally. Always the optimist and gentleman, he will be greatly missed by family, neighbours, and his many friends and colleagues here and abroad.

  • AAA HQ
    Joe Rhile
    memorial posted September 3, 2009 by AAA HQ, tagged 2008, memorial 
    colleague's name:
    Joe Rhile
    dates:
    1913 - 2008
    photo:
    photo description:
    Joe Rhile accepting the American Accounting Association’s Service Award at the 2005 Annual Meeting
    memorial:

    Accounting education lost a long-established leader and advocate with the death of Dr. Joseph (Joe) Rhile in November. As an emeritus professor at Lake Sumter Community College, Joe dedicated considerable time and leadership to the American Accounting Association, most recently working with AAA staff on a new edition of the “Rhile Directory” of Accounting faculty at 2-year colleges. That project will continue with warm memories of Joe and his efforts to support the community of 2-year colleagues.

    more:

    Dr. Joseph Rhile, Ph.D., 95, of Leesburg, FL passed away November 24, 2008. Dr. Rhile was very active for many years in the AAA as the organizer and Charter Chairperson of the Two-Year College Section of the AAA. In 2005 he received AAA’s Outstanding Service Award for creating and publishing the Two-Year Accounting Faculty Directory. He also received the Lifetime Achievement in Accounting Education Award of the Two-Year College Section. Dr. Rhile was an educator from 1937 to 1982 but remained active even after retirement. He was the welcoming role-model with sage advice for the many faculty who followed him in accounting education and involvement in the AAA. Dr. Rhile also was the co-organizer and president of the Florida Association of Accounting Educators, and has presented and published a number of papers on accounting education.

  • Deirdre Harris
    John C. (Sandy) Burton - 1932-2010
    memorial posted August 30, 2010 by Deirdre Harris, tagged 2010, memorial 
    colleague's name:
    John C. (Sandy) Burton - 1932-2010
    dates:
    1932 – 2010
    memorial:

    John C. (Sandy) Burton was born in New York City on September 17, 1932 and died in the same city on May 16, 2010. To Sandy, New York City was home in every sense.

    His B.A. was taken in political science at Haverford College in 1954. He obtained an M.B.A. in 1956 and a Ph.D. in 1962 from Columbia University. From 1956 to 1960, he was a staff accountant at Arthur Young & Company in New York City. His father, James Campbell Burton, was the firm’s senior partner until his retirement in 1956. Sandy loved baseball and keeping statistics for the Brooklyn Dodgers. When the Dodgers moved to Los Angeles in 1958, Sandy was tempted to accept President Walter O’Malley’s invitation to go west with the team as the Dodgers’ chief accountant.

    From 1962 to 1972, he was on the accounting and finance faculty at Columbia, eventually becoming Professor. In 1972, Chairman William J. Casey tapped Sandy to become the Chief Accountant of the Securities and Exchange Commission, a position he held until 1976. He was an activist Chief Accountant who was outspokenly critical of accounting and auditing practices as well as of the performance of accounting firms, and during his tenure the Commission issued a record number of Accounting Series Releases. In 1975, he launched the SEC’s series of Staff Accounting Bulletins, and, during an inflationary decade, he was responsible for the SEC’s requirement, instituted in 1976, that approximately one thousand large registrants disclose replacement cost information on merchandise and fixed assets in a supplement to their financial statements. He gave his speeches as Chief Accountant without notes, always tinged with wit and humor. His articles, many of which were drawn from his speeches, were pungent, insightful and progressive in spirit.

    From 1976 to 1977, he served for 18 months as Deputy Mayor for Finance of New York City, at a time of severe financial strain on the city. From 1978 until his retirement in 2002, he was Arthur Young (later Ernst & Young) Professor of Accounting and Finance at Columbia, and from 1982 to 1988 he was Dean of Columbia’s Graduate School of Business.

    He was the AAA’s Academic Vice President from 1980 to 1982. Together with Bob Sack, he co-edited Accounting Horizons from 1989 to 1991. In 1997, he was inducted into the Accounting Hall of Fame at The Ohio State University.

    Sandy wrote or edited seven books and was the author of more than 50 articles.

    Sandy is survived by his wife Jane, daughter Eve, son Bruce, eight grandchildren, and two great-grandchildren.

    Stephen A. Zeff.

  • Deirdre Harris
    John Wilson Dickhaut, Jr. - 1942-2010
    memorial posted August 30, 2010 by Deirdre Harris, tagged 2010, memorial 
    colleague's name:
    John Wilson Dickhaut, Jr. - 1942-2010
    dates:
    1942-2010
    memorial:

    John Dickhaut passed away April 10, 2010 at his California home following a long and courageous battle with cancer. John was a widely respected member of the accounting and economics academic communities. At the time of his death, he was the Jerrold A. Glass Endowed Chair in Accounting and Economics at Chapman University. He was also the Emeritus Curtis L. Carlson Land Grant Chair in Accounting Professor at the University of Minnesota where he had served on the faculty from 1976 to 2008.

    John W. Dickhaut, Jr. was born on February 10, 1942. He was the son of John W. and Margaret S. Dickhaut and brother of Robert Dickhaut. John’s father was a Methodist minister and founder and President of the Methodist Theological School in Ohio. He loved his father’s spontaneous, “corny” sense of humor, admired his mother’s determination and ability to fully immerse herself in every moment of life, and marveled at his brother’s voracious appetite for books.

    He grew up in Columbus, Ohio, and received a B.A. in English Literature from Duke University in 1964. Upon graduation, he returned to Columbus where he entered a Master’s program in accounting at the Ohio State University. He received his Master’s degree in 1966, but along the way was encouraged by Professor Thomas Burns to seek a PhD. He received his PhD from Ohio State in 1970 and took his first faculty position at the University of Chicago.

    John’s early research was in the traditional accounting domain. His dissertation paper won the AAA’s Manuscript Contest and was published in the January 1973 issue of The Accounting Review. This paper was among the earliest attempts in the accounting literature to use experimental methods. Several papers followed in the Journal of Accounting Research and other accounting outlets over the first part of his career.

    After 1980, John’s research broadened when his interests shifted into experimental economics. He made fundamental contributions that fostered understanding of human risk preferences and trust in economic interaction. His work included studies using agent-based models to study market phenomena, and he was an early pioneer in “neuroeconomics,” an emergent area that studies the relation between the human brain and economic choice. This research was published in leading academic journals such as Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States (PNAS), Games and Economic Behavior, Quarterly Journal of Economics, and Management Science.

    Among John’s papers are classic studies that have had and will continue to have a major impact. His 1995 paper in Games and Economic Behavior with Joyce Berg and Kevin McCabe on the “trust game” has been cited over a thousand times and been replicated in hundreds of studies. His 2005 PNAS paper on risk preference instability (also with Berg and McCabe) was highlighted by the editors of Science magazine in its “Editor’s Choice” column of March 25, 2005. His recent work in PNAS (December 29, 2009) with Aldo Rustichini and Vernon Smith offers a comprehensive theory of economic choice that seeks to simultaneously explain data observed in behavioral choices and physiological measurement of activity within the brain. John’s recent move back to basic accounting issues is an attempt to reconcile what we know about the brain with how accounting has been shaped (see “The Brain as the Original Accounting Institution,” The Accounting Review, November 2009).

    It might seem surprising that John would begin in academic accounting, but end up doing basic research in neuroscience. But, John was forward-looking and he may have intended that the human brain would be his ultimate research destination. I was at Chapman when John passed away, and a few days later came across a book in his office entitled Signal Detection Theory and Psychophysics, by Green and Swets. He had checked out this book from Regenstein Library at the University of Chicago on October 10, 1972, but had never returned it. I became curious as to whether he had cited it directly in any of his papers. (Most likely, he acquired this book while working on a study with Ian Eggleton on human processing of quantitative data published in the Journal of Accounting Research in Spring 1975.) I found only one direct citation for the Green and Swets book: the 2009 PNAS paper with Rustichini and Smith that used signal detection theory as a foundation for their neuronal-based theory of economic choice.

    John Dickhaut had a profound influence on a generation of graduate students and faculty colleagues. Students where he served as a dissertation chair or committee member (not to mention co-author) include Joyce Berg, Robert Bushman, Carol Eger, Steve Gjerstad, Todd Kaplan, Meg Ledyard, Radhika Lunawat, John O’Brien, Haresh Sapra, Tim Shields, Jack Stecher, and Baohua Xing. These individuals learned much about conducting research, and they directly observed how research could be great fun. Colleagues from Chapman, Minnesota, and other universities can regale others with “Dickhaut stories.” These might recount a heated debate in a workshop, how he worked for hours with a co-author to get every last detail right on a paper, or how he wore his “Goofy” slippers through the halls of academia while singing a favorite song at a volume that everyone within a half mile radius could hear.

    His final institutional love was for the Economic Science Institute at Chapman University. ESI, founded by economist Vernon Smith along with John, Dave Porter, Steve Rassenti, and Bart Wilson, is a unique group dedicated to the use of scientific experimentation to discover fundamental aspects of human economic behavior. The working partnership of these scholars was something that John felt very strongly about. He had found a new home at Chapman, and that was evident when he was gave the first Lectio Magistralis there in November 2008 (video available online at http://www.chapman.edu/CHANCELLOR/lectioMag.asp#archives).

    Colleagues, students, and friends will remember John Dickhaut as a genius who brimmed with enthusiasm for life, humor, and intellectual intensity. His research work had continued through several rounds of cancer treatment that spanned a decade. His passion for life and the “life of the mind” was apparent up to his final moments. The final time I spoke with John was on the evening before he died (I had been at Chapman to present a seminar earlier that day on a paper we are writing). Our conversation, like all of our talks, focused on what we wanted to accomplish in the future with this paper and the others we had planned. It brought a huge smile to my face when a few days later I discovered the following entry that John had written in his personal journal on January 7, 1985:

    “Suppose I say – tomorrow is the last day of my life. The trick is to feel it. Not to be afraid. I feel more alert. More awake.

    I will be planning in the last day of my life. The plans will be immense ones. I will die with a vision. I will be envisioning when I die. I will be looking forward. I will have created a number of alternatives, all relating to my life structure.”

    John Dickhaut was a loving and generous man. He touched us. He inspired us to be better. He lives within us because he came closer than anyone to living every day as if it were his final one.  

    John is survived by his loving friend and wife, Sheri, his brother, Robert Dickhaut, Bob’s wife, Veronique, and John’s niece, Charlotte, and nephew, Jason, an undergraduate student at the University of Chicago.

    Gregory Waymire

    Atlanta, Georgia

    June 7, 2010

  • Judy Cothern
    Kathleen Lorraine Casper5100%
    memorial posted August 25, 2014 by Judy Cothern, tagged 2014, memorial 
    colleague's name:
    Kathleen Lorraine Casper
    dates:
    Oct. 10, 1950 - Aug. 14, 2014
    photo:
    photo description:
    Kathleen Lorraine Casper
    memorial:

    On August 14, 2014, the American Accounting Association lost one if its own:  Kathy Casper. Many of you got to know Kathy during her 16 years with the Association.  As the Web and Database Project Manager, she was instrumental in moving us into the 21st century.  In fact, she worked on early web pages and independently designed, developed and implemented our annual meeting system, enhancing it annually based on the feedback she received from the many volunteers who worked with her. She also implemented the new segment meeting system that was introduced over the past year.

    Outside of work, Kathy was very active in the Faith Lutheran Church where she provided service in many ways.  Having done missionary work in Haiti in 2005, Kathy was devoted to fundraising for Haitian children's education and care.  She was also a passionate writer, publishing many articles and poetry.

    Kathy’s quick wit, creativity, broad smile and kind heart will be deeply missed by all who knew her.  If you have memories of Kathy you’d like to share with her sister and three daughters, please email them to info@aaahq.org.  Additionally, in Kathy’s honor, charitable donations can be made to the Faith Lutheran Church for the Haiti Fund care of Faith Lutheran Church, 7750 Beneva Road, Sarasota, FL. 

  • Nancy Maciag
    Mark Trombley
    memorial posted February 5, 2015 by Nancy Maciag 
    colleague's name:
    Mark Trombley
    photo:
    memorial:

    Mark Trombley, Beach Fleischman Professor of Accounting, died unexpectedly at his home on January 20, 2015.  Mark had been a member of the Eller faculty at the University of Arizona since 1990 when he completed his doctoral degree at the University of Washington.  Prior to that, he worked for Deloitte, a Big Four CPA firm, from 1976 to 1986. 

    Mark was known as a selfless colleague who was very generous with his time and talents.  He published over 20 articles in high quality accounting and finance journals. His research focused on financial accounting issues of contemporary debate in the academic as well as the professional community. In particular, he examined stock market efficiency in using accounting data to value a firm, factors affecting accounting method choices by firms, and the relevance of accounting data for firm valuation. He was active nationally in providing service to the accounting research community, serving on the editorial board of The Accounting Review from 2005-2008 and then as an editor from 2008-2011.  He was an ad hoc reviewer for many different accounting and finance journals and was a member of several American Accounting Association research-oriented committees, such as the Wildman Award Committee and the best dissertation award for the Financial Accounting and Reporting Section.

    Mark was an award-winning teacher who won recognition from the college and the Arizona State CPA Society.  He taught a variety of courses at the undergraduate, MBA, and PhD levels. Students greatly appreciated his teaching style and highly respected his knowledge of the subject matter. He wrote a textbook on accounting for derivatives and hedging.  In addition, accounting doctoral students benefited greatly from Mark’s time and attention. He was a committee member for over 30 doctoral students and provided research assistance and guidance over time to nearly every doctoral student in the accounting program during his tenure as a faculty member.

  • Deirdre Harris
    Maurice Moonitz
    memorial posted September 23, 2009 by Deirdre Harris, tagged 2009, memorial 
    colleague's name:
    Maurice Moonitz
    dates:
    1910 - 2009
    photo:
    memorial:

    Maurice Moonitz, who was born in Cincinnati, Ohio on October 31, 1910, died on July 24, 2009 at the age of 98. He served as vice president in 1958 and president in 1978-79 of the American Accounting Association. In 1985, he received the AAA’s Outstanding Accounting Educator Award.  In 1979, he was inducted as the 39th member of the Accounting Hall of Fame at The Ohio State University. He was best known to professional accountants as the first Director of Accounting Research at the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA) from 1960 to 1963 and as a member of the Accounting Principles Board (APB) from 1963 to 1966.

    more:

    Moonitz received B.S. and M.S. degrees from the University of California at Berkeley in 1933 and 1936, respectively, and a Ph.D. from Berkeley in 1941. He was an instructor for five years at the University of Santa Clara and for two years at Stanford University and then spent three years on the staff of Arthur Andersen & Co. in San Francisco prior to joining the Berkeley accounting faculty in 1947. He retired from Berkeley in 1978, becoming a Professor Emeritus. While on leave in 1966-68, he was founding director of the Lingnan Institute of Business Administration, in the Chinese University of Hong Kong.

    Perhaps his two most widely cited publications were The Basic Postulates of Accounting and A Tentative Set of Broad Accounting Principles for Business Enterprises (with Robert T. Sprouse), published as accounting research studies in 1961 and 1962, respectively, by the AICPA. They were to form the basis for the newly created APB’s major initiative on establishing the accounting principles to underlie its future Opinions.

    Moonitz wrote or edited 14 books and monographs and more than 70 articles and book reviews in his long career. Many of his articles were published in a two-volume anthology entitled Selected Writings, published by Garland in 1990. He once wrote that he had a long and abiding interest in the concept of entity in accounting theory, and his monograph, The Entity Theory of Consolidated Statements, published by the AAA in 1944 and reprinted twice, and also published in Japanese translation, continues to be an influential work today. The main lines of his research have been the standard-setting process and enforcement (both in accounting and auditing), accounting for the effects of changing prices, and the theory and practice of financial reporting.

    Moonitz was an accomplished violinist and loved to play with chamber music groups in California and New York. He was married twice and is survived by his three children, Judy, David, and Elaine.

     

    Stephen A. Zeff