Auditing Section Research Summaries Space

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  • Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips
    Detecting and Predicting Accounting Irregularities: A...
    research summary posted October 20, 2014 by Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips, tagged 06.0 Risk and Risk Management, Including Fraud Risk, 06.02 Fraud Risk Models, 06.05 Assessing Risk of Material Misstatement 
    Title:
    Detecting and Predicting Accounting Irregularities: A Comparison of Commercial and Academic Risk Measures
    Practical Implications:

    The results of this study should be useful to research practitioners, regulators, investors, auditors (internal and external), managers, boards of directors, and analysts.  Academic researchers who study fraud or aggressive financial reporting should also be interested in understanding which risk measures have the highest statistical power and construct validity.  One clear advantage of the academic risk measures is that, unlike commercially developed risk measures that are proprietary by nature, researchers know all of the inputs to the academic measures.  On the other hand, studies that need an overall estimate of ex ante financial reporting risk or studies with small or limited sample sizes are likely to benefit the most from using comprehensive, commercially developed risk measures like AGR due to its improved statistical power.

     

    For more information on this study, please contact David A. Wood.

    Citation:

    Price III, R. A., N. Y. Sharp, and D. A. Wood. 2011. Detecting and predicting accounting irregularities:  A comparison of commercial and academic risk measures. Accounting Horizons 25 (4): 755-780

  • Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips
    A Review and Model of Auditor Judgments in Fraud-Related...
    research summary posted October 22, 2013 by Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips, tagged 06.0 Risk and Risk Management, Including Fraud Risk, 06.01 Fraud Risk Assessment, 06.02 Fraud Risk Models 
    Title:
    A Review and Model of Auditor Judgments in Fraud-Related Planning Tasks
    Practical Implications:

    The primary implication of the model based on the literature is that simply because auditors may assess fraud risk at a higher level due to the presence of risk factors, it does not necessarily mean that planned audit procedures designed to address these risks will be effective.  Although being aware of fraud risk is necessary to respond appropriately, being aware of only general risk factors makes it difficult for auditors to formulate possible fraud schemes that a client may perpetrate.  As a result, audit plans designed to respond to general fraud risks tend to increase the extent of testing, but do not alter the nature of the testing in a way that would be more likely to catch fraud.  If auditors identify specific situational cues and are able to generate a plausible fraud scheme as a result, more effective tests that alter the nature of the procedures can be identified and carried out.  Therefore, knowledge of fraud risks via experience or training, particularly for risks specific to a client or industry, will help to allow generation of plausible fraud schemes and the design of effective tests.

    For more information on this study, please contact Jacqueline Hammersley.
     

    Citation:

    Hammersley, J. S. 2011. A Review and Model of Auditor Judgments in Fraud-Related Planning Tasks. Auditing: A Journal of Practice & Theory 30 (4), 101-128.

  • Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips
    COMMENTARY FROM THE AMERICAN ACCOUNTING ASSOCIATION’S 2011 A...
    research summary posted October 22, 2013 by Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips, tagged 06.0 Risk and Risk Management, Including Fraud Risk, 06.02 Fraud Risk Models, 09.0 Auditor Judgment, 09.10 Prior Dispositions/Biases/Auditor state of mind 
    Title:
    COMMENTARY FROM THE AMERICAN ACCOUNTING ASSOCIATION’S 2011 ANNUAL MEETING PANEL ON EMERGING ISSUES IN FRAUD RESEARCH
    Practical Implications:

    When performing brainstorming sessions as mandated by SAS 99, auditors should brainstorm personality traits that may reveal potential fraudsters. Additionally, firms and academics should work to identify characteristics that provide an indication of which individuals are more likely to commit fraud.

    For more information on this study, please contact Sara Melendy.
     

    Citation:

    Brody, R. G., S. R. Melendy, and F. S. Perri 2012. Commentary from the American Accounting Association’s 2011 annual meeting panel on emerging issues in fraud research. Accounting Horizons 26 (3): 513-531.

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