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  • Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips
    Auditor Attestation under SOX Section 404 and Earnings...
    research summary posted June 2, 2014 by Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips, tagged 01.0 Standard Setting, 01.04 Impact of 404, 01.05 Impact of SOX, 07.0 Internal Control, 07.05 Impact of 404 on Fees and Financial Reporting Quality 
    Title:
    Auditor Attestation under SOX Section 404 and Earnings Informativeness
    Practical Implications:

    Section 404 is one of the most controversial provisions of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. Many studies have examined the negative consequences of adverse reports on internal control issued by the auditor. Other studies have looked at the cost of compliance of Section 404 and find that it is burdensome, disproportionately so for small companies. This study focuses on the benefits of internal control audits. Regulators have argued that the benefits of Section 404 are hard to measure because of the difficulty in quantifying the benefits. This study contributes to the debate on the benefits of Section 404 by documenting evidence that although compliance with Section 404’s requirements has been reported to be associated with high costs, the first-time internal control reports seem to have increased earnings informativeness. 

    Citation:

    Chen, L. H., J. Krishnan, H. Sami, and H. Zhou. 2013. Auditor Attestation under SOX Section 404 and Earnings Informativeness. Auditing 32 (1).

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  • Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips
    Auditor Realignments Accompanying Implementation of SOX 404...
    research summary posted June 22, 2013 by Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips, tagged 01.0 Standard Setting, 01.04 Impact of 404, 01.05 Impact of SOX, 07.0 Internal Control, 07.03 Reporting Material Weaknesses, 07.05 Impact of 404 on Fees and Financial Reporting Quality 
    Title:
    Auditor Realignments Accompanying Implementation of SOX 404 ICFR Reporting Requirements
    Practical Implications:

    The results of this study are important for showing the impact of SOX requirements on the audit environment.  The evidence suggests that ICFR opinions provide clients with information to assess the effectiveness of auditors.  After adverse internal control opinions, clients dismiss auditors in order to obtain higher quality audits, measured by switches to Big 4 and industry specialist auditors.  However, only industry specialist auditors are associated with remediation of adverse reports. 

    Citation:

    Ettredge, M., J. Heintz, C. Li, and S. Scholz. 2011. Auditor realignments accompanying implementation of SOX 404 ICFR reporting requirements. Accounting Horizons 25 (1): 17-39.

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  • Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips
    Auditors’ Internal Controls over Financial Reporting D...
    research summary posted December 1, 2014 by Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips, tagged 01.0 Standard Setting, 01.04 Impact of 404, 07.0 Internal Control, 07.01 Scope of Testing 
    Title:
    Auditors’ Internal Controls over Financial Reporting Decisions: Analysis, Synthesis, and Research Directions
    Practical Implications:

    In the planning phase, the PCAOB and key stakeholders should consider developing an ICOFR audit risk model to serve as a conceptual planning and evaluative model. Audit firms should pay attention to aligning auditors’ skill sets to their task assignments and employ other mechanisms that encourage consultations.

    Scoping decisions remain underexplored. Nevertheless, anecdotal evidence suggests that auditors may be cognitively wired to scope some types of ELCs but not others. Firms may consider the interactions between auditors and client personnel that explain the tendency for auditors to evaluate only the ELCs scoped by the client.

    Audit firms should pay special attention to how audit teams design testing plans to test ELCs that are not easily tested by attribute sampling methods (e.g., management philosophy and operating style). This is necessary to address concerns by PCAOB inspections that some auditors identified ELCs that appeared to be designed to operate with a high degree of precision, but failed to obtain sufficient audit evidence of their operating effectiveness.

    In the evaluation phase, firms should consider mechanisms that can help auditors “imagine what could go wrong where nothing wrong has happened.” Examples of such mechanisms include restructuring the task (e.g., documentation, decomposition of the task, or requirements to list what could go wrong). In the reporting phase, firms should consider having a requirement to specifically require auditors to consider the needs of a prudent official. This requirement may be a countervailing check on their detection and disclosure incentives.

    For more information on this study, please contact Stephen K. Asare.

    Citation:

    Asare, S. A., B. C. Fitzgerald, L. E. Graham, J. R. Joe, E. M. Negangard, and C. J. Wolfe. 2013. Auditors’ Internal Controls over Financial Reporting Decisions: Analysis, Synthesis, and Research Directions. Auditing: A Journal of Practice and Theory 32 (sp1): 131-166.

  • Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips
    Balancing the Costs and Benefits of Auditing and Financial...
    research summary posted March 30, 2015 by Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips, tagged 01.0 Standard Setting, 01.02 Changes in Audit Standards, 01.03 Impact of New Accounting Pronouncements, 01.04 Impact of 404 
    Title:
    Balancing the Costs and Benefits of Auditing and Financial Reporting Regulation Post-SOX, Part I: Perspectives from the Nexus at the SEC
    Practical Implications:

    The results of this study are important because they illuminate the impact of new accounting rules on standard setters and companies abiding by these rules (in this case, the specific context was the implementation process related to SOX Section 404). The study suggests that a number of steps are required in order to perfect the guidance. It is important to understand the meaning and intentions behind authoritative literature in order to follow it. The observations suggest that the process for implementing new guidance has room for change, yet has evolved over time to increase effectiveness. The findings are specific to the implementation for assessment and auditing of internal controls for public companies.

    For more information on this study, please contact Zoe-Vonna Palmrose (zv.palmrose@marshall.usc.edu).

    Citation:

    Palmrose, Z.-V. 2010. Balancing the Costs and Benefits of Auditing and Financial Reporting Regulation Post-SOX, Part I: Perspectives from the Nexus at the SEC. Accounting Horizons 24 (2):313-326.

  • Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips
    Board Independence and Internal Control Weakness: Evidence...
    research summary posted June 22, 2017 by Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips, tagged 01.04 Impact of 404, 07.03 Reporting Material Weaknesses, 13.01 Board/Audit Committee Composition 
    Title:
    Board Independence and Internal Control Weakness: Evidence from SOX 404 Disclosures
    Practical Implications:

    This study examines the effects on internal control weaknesses associated with an independent board of directors. A benefit of having an independent board is the timely remediation of ICWs. This is of high importance because the quicker a material weakness is resolved, the sooner a company can return to normal operations. Another contribution of this study is the discovery of implications regarding Auditing Standard No. 5. The standard changed internal control evaluation to become more holistic and less detailed. This provides the board of directors less tangible information on the status of internal controls.

    Citation:

    Chen, Yangyang, Robert. W. Kechel., V. B. Marisetty, C. Truong, and M. Veeraraghavan.2017. Board Independence and Internal Control Weakness: Evidence from SOX 404 Disclosures. Auditing, A Journal of Practice and Theory 36(21): 45-62.

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  • Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips
    Detection and Severity Classifications of Sarbanes-Oxley...
    research summary posted October 24, 2013 by Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips, tagged 01.0 Standard Setting, 01.04 Impact of 404, 07.0 Internal Control, 07.02 Assessing Material Weaknesses, 07.04 Assessing Remediation of Weaknesses 
    Title:
    Detection and Severity Classifications of Sarbanes-Oxley Section 404 Internal Control Deficiencies
    Practical Implications:

    The results of this study support the value of auditor involvement at two stages of the ICFR assessment process (detection and classification), and contribute to understanding of factors associated with client and auditor performance in both stages. The study also provides direct evidence on the “yield” of detection methods used by auditors. This issue is at the heart of the debate on the value of auditor involvement in assessing and testing internal controls. Lastly, the findings of this study imply that the recent exemption of Section 404(b) for smaller U.S. public companies could result in failure to fully realize potential improvements in financial reporting quality in that sector of the market.

    For more information on this study, please contact Jean Bedard.
     

    Citation:

    Bedard, J. C. and L. Graham. 2011. Detection and Severity Classifications of Sarbanes-Oxley Section 404 Internal Control Deficiencies.  The Accounting Review 86 (3):  825-855. 

  • Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips
    Do Small Firms Benefit from Auditor Attestation of Internal...
    research summary posted October 22, 2013 by Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips, tagged 01.0 Standard Setting, 01.04 Impact of 404, 12.0 Accountants’ Reports and Reporting, 12.07 Attestation Services 
    Title:
    Do Small Firms Benefit from Auditor Attestation of Internal Control Effectiveness?
    Practical Implications:

    This study can inform regulators, investors, and others of the potential consequences of exempting non-accelerated filers from Section 404(b) of SOX. The results of this study support the notion that an auditor’s opinion on the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting adds value beyond certifications provided by management. Additionally, the results of the study support the notion that investors in small public firms regard auditors’ assessment of the effectiveness of internal controls as adding value via higher revenue quality relative to firms that are not required to submit themselves to additional scrutiny by their auditors. Thus, firms contemplating exiting accelerated status may want to consider that such a move may have an adverse effect on firm valuation.

    Citation:

    Krishnan, G. V., and W. Yu. 2012. Do Small Firms Benefit from Auditor Attestation of Internal Control Effectiveness? Auditing: A Journal of Practice and Theory 31(4): 115-137.

  • Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips
    Early Warnings of Internal Control Problems: Additional...
    research summary posted May 25, 2014 by Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips, tagged 01.0 Standard Setting, 01.04 Impact of 404, 07.0 Internal Control, 07.03 Reporting Material Weaknesses, 12.0 Accountants’ Reports and Reporting, 12.06 Consequences of Adverse 404 Opinions 
    Title:
    Early Warnings of Internal Control Problems: Additional Evidence
    Practical Implications:

    The results of this study raise many interesting questions. The fact that accelerated filers’ adverse internal control opinions continue to be a surprise over 50 percent of the time suggest that auditors continue to find internal control problems that management had not previously identified or had not evaluated as MWs. The results related to non-accelerated filers provide some interesting data related to the ongoing debate about the efficacy of Section 404(b) testing by auditors. The authors also note that examining the early warnings of non-accelerated filers tells us only about what management of these companies report; it does not give us insight into what auditors would report. The results also raise other interesting issues for future research.

    Citation:

    Munsif, V., K. Raghunandan, and D. V. Rama. 2013. Early Warnings of Internal Control Problems: Additional Evidence. Auditing 32 (2).

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  • Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips
    Home Country Investor Protection, Ownership Structure and...
    research summary posted July 29, 2015 by Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips, tagged 01.0 Standard Setting, 01.04 Impact of 404, 01.05 Impact of SOX, 07.0 Internal Control, 07.05 Impact of 404 on Fees and Financial Reporting Quality 
    Title:
    Home Country Investor Protection, Ownership Structure and Cross-Listed Firms’ Compliance with SOX-Mandated Internal Control Disclosures.
    Practical Implications:

    The results carry important implications for regulators, investors, and researchers. The findings suggest both firm-level corporate governance and home country investor protection still matter in explaining the disclosure behavior of cross-listed firms. Hence, it may be warranted for U.S. securities regulators to devote more resources to monitoring the financial disclosure quality of CONTROL_WEDGE firms from weak investor protection countries. The results suggest that U.S. investors should pay closer attention to the financial disclosure quality of cross-listed firms, especially CONTROL_WEDGE firms from weak investor protection countries. This is important because the recent accounting frauds involving cross-listed firms suggest that U.S. investors might not have paid sufficient attention to the disclosure quality, and as a result suffered significant economic losses after the revelation of the accounting frauds.

    Citation:

    Gong, G., Ke, B., & Yu, Y. 2013. Home Country Investor Protection, Ownership Structure and Cross-Listed Firms' Compliance with SOX-Mandated Internal Control Deficiency Disclosures. Contemporary Accounting Research 30 (4): 1490-1523. 

  • Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips
    PCAOB Inspection Consequences, Processes, and Inspection...
    research summary posted October 22, 2014 by Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips, tagged 01.0 Standard Setting, 01.04 Impact of 404, 01.05 Impact of SOX 
    Title:
    PCAOB Inspection Consequences, Processes, and Inspection Team Performance: Perspectives of Triennially Inspected Firms
    Practical Implications:

    The results of this study are important to practitioners, regulators, legislators, academicians, and other market participants as many aspects of SOX and PCAOB inspections have been criticized. Oversight bodies have modified SOX in response to concerns of oversight groups (Advisory Committee on Smaller Public Companies). Researchers and practitioners have called for research to study the impact of SOX on audit quality and the public interest. The Government Accountability Office (GAO), required by SOX to study the potential effects of further mandates, chose to wait several years to monitor and evaluate the effectiveness of SOX and the PCAOB on auditor independence and audit quality before proposing any further modifications (GAO 2004). We interpret our findings as suggesting the efficacy of PCAOB inspections may be enhanced by focusing on potential unintended consequences and inspection process modifications rather than on inspectors’ qualifications and actions.

     

    For more information on this study, please contact Brian Daugherty at University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

    Citation:

    Daugherty, B., and W. Tervo. 2010. PCAOB Inspection Consequences, Processes, and Inspection Team Performance: Perspectives of Triennially Inspected Firms. Accounting Horizons 24 (2):189-219.

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