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  • Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips
    The Impact of the Big 4 Consolidation on Audit Market Share...
    research summary posted October 29, 2013 by Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips, tagged 01.0 Standard Setting, 01.05 Impact of SOX 
    Title:
    The Impact of the Big 4 Consolidation on Audit Market Share Equality
    Practical Implications:

    The findings of this study indicate that the overall audit market share between the remaining 4 firms has actually become more equalized after consolidation than when there were 5 firms. Firm leaders concerned with addressing competition over clients in the auditing field could benefit from understanding the effects of Andersen’s demise and the passing of SOX that resulted in a more equal market share among the firms as well as a more constrained variety of choices for audit clients.

    For more information on this study, please contact Kimberly Dunn.
     

    Citation:

    Dunn, K., M. Kohlbeck, and B.W. Mayhew. 2011. The impact of the big 4 consolidation on audit market share equality 30 (1): 49-73.

  • Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips
    The Influence of Auditor and Client Section 404 Processes on...
    research summary posted October 22, 2014 by Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips, tagged 01.0 Standard Setting, 01.04 Impact of 404, 07.0 Internal Control, 07.04 Assessing Remediation of Weaknesses 
    Title:
    The Influence of Auditor and Client Section 404 Processes on Remediation of Internal Control Deficiencies at All Levels of Severity
    Practical Implications:

    Overall, this study suggests that remediation of detected ICFR problems prior to the balance sheet date is one benefit of Section 404 activity to stakeholders. This study’s finding of lower remediation of auditor-discovered ICDs implies that client personnel missed the control flaw in their own Section 404(a) process, so may lack the expertise to remediate the problem. This calls into question the current policy of relying on Section 404(a) alone for non-accelerated filer (most public companies). Further, this study’s results on client processes imply that the most important factors affecting remediation are not who directly manages the process, but rather the client’s organization of the process in making an early start and coordinating the effort with IT personnel.

    For more information on this study, please contact Jean C. Bedard.

    Citation:

    Graham, L., and J.C. Bedard. 2013. The Influence of Auditor and Client Section 404 Processes on Remediation of Internal Control Deficiencies at All Levels of Severity. Auditing: A Journal of Practice & Theory 32(4): 45-69

  • Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips
    The Interactive Effects of Internal Control Audits and...
    research summary posted July 28, 2015 by Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips, tagged 01.0 Standard Setting, 01.04 Impact of 404, 01.05 Impact of SOX, 07.0 Internal Control, 07.05 Impact of 404 on Fees and Financial Reporting Quality 
    Title:
    The Interactive Effects of Internal Control Audits and Manager Legal Liability on Managers' Internal Controls Decisions, Investor Confidence, and Market Prices.
    Practical Implications:

    The results demonstrate a demand for IC audits such that, even in the presence of increased manager liability, the IC audit incrementally motivates managers to spend on improving IC and to provide more consistent and accurate ICFR disclosures. Unlike managers, investors react as though manager liability and IC audits are substitutes. This finding has implications for policymakers as it demonstrates the need to consider the possible differing effects of regulation on managers and investors. Moreover, with respect to regulatory actions to simultaneously implement both manager liability and an IC audit, the results suggest that both mechanisms may not be necessary to improve investors’ confidence and in turn market prices.

    Citation:

    Wu, Y., & Tuttle, B. 2014. The Interactive Effects of Internal Control Audits and Manager Legal Liability on Managers' Internal Controls Decisions, Investor Confidence, and Market Prices. Contemporary Accounting Research 31 (2): 444-468.

  • Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips
    The PCAOB Meets the Constitution: The Supreme Court to...
    research summary posted March 11, 2015 by Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips, tagged 01.0 Standard Setting, 01.06 Impact of PCAOB, 04.0 Independence and Ethics 
    Title:
    The PCAOB Meets the Constitution: The Supreme Court to Decide on the PCAOB’s Conformity with the Separation of Powers Doctrine and Appointments Clause
    Practical Implications:

    From a policy point of view, the case highlights the importance of the combination of independence and accountability for auditing and accounting standard setting and practice. The implication of the Supreme Court’s decision about the constitutionality of the PCAOB is three folds: 1. the future of auditing oversight; 2. the validity of SOX; 3. the future of independent agencies in general.

    Citation:

    King, R. R. 2010. The PCAOB Meets the Constitution: The Supreme Court to Decide on the PCAOB's Conformity with the Separation of Powers Doctrine and Appointments Clause. Accounting Horizons 24(1): 79-93.

  • Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips
    The Spillover of SOX on Earnings Quality in Non-U.S....
    research summary posted March 22, 2016 by Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips, tagged 01.0 Standard Setting, 01.05 Impact of SOX, 14.0 Corporate Matters, 14.01 Earnings Management 
    Title:
    The Spillover of SOX on Earnings Quality in Non-U.S. Jurisdictions.
    Practical Implications:

    The costs and benefits of SOX have been researched by numerous authors, however the benefits outside of the United States have generally been limited to those of firms that are listed on U.S. exchanges. The authors observe improvements in earnings quality for subsidiaries of U.S. firms which file financial reports in Belgium, suggesting that there is a spillover effect of SOX compliance outside of domestic firms. The authors caveat that they cannot determine if the results are driven by improved internal controls or improved audit quality of the parent company, but they show improvement in foreign-filing earnings in spite of these financial reports being generated outside of the U.S. reporting process.

    Citation:

    Dutillieux, W., J.R. Francis, M. Willekens. 2016. The Spillover of SOX on Earnings Quality in Non-U.S. Jurisdictions. Accounting Horizons 30 (1): 23-39.

  • Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips
    The Strategic Effects of Auditing Standard No. 5 in a...
    research summary posted June 15, 2016 by Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips, tagged 01.0 Standard Setting, 01.03 Impact of New Accounting Pronouncements, 06.0 Risk and Risk Management, Including Fraud Risk, 06.02 Fraud Risk Models 
    Title:
    The Strategic Effects of Auditing Standard No. 5 in a Multi-Location Setting
    Practical Implications:

     This paper examines how the auditor’s evaluation of internal control impacts substantive testing in a two-location setting with correlated internal control strengths. When control strengths are independent, internal control strength pairings have no effect on the manager’s probability choice to commit fraud or on the auditor’s substantive test effort. This study shows how the manager’s opportunity to commit fraud and informational characteristics of internal control tests impact the manager’s probability choice of fraud and the auditor’s choice of substantive test effort.

    Citation:

    Patterson, E.R. and J.R. Smith. 2016. The Strategic Effects of Auditing Standard No. 5 in a Multi-Location Setting. Auditing: A Journal of Practice and Theory 35 (1): 119-138. 

  • Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips
    The Use of Business Risk Audit Perspectives by Non-Big 4...
    research summary posted March 10, 2015 by Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips, tagged 01.0 Standard Setting, 01.02 Changes in Audit Standards, 06.0 Risk and Risk Management, Including Fraud Risk, 06.05 Assessing Risk of Material Misstatement 
    Title:
    The Use of Business Risk Audit Perspectives by Non-Big 4 Audit Firms
    Practical Implications:

    The first implication is a call for proportionality and flexibility to adopt an audit approach that meets the client-audit firm context. SMP auditors told us that they struggle with achieving proportionality by not performing some audit procedures such as entity-level analytical procedures for smaller clients, because they feel obliged to perform these procedures to comply with documentation requirements of the auditing standards or of regulators and oversight bodies. Such experiences may result in inefficient, ‘‘check-the-box’’ audits in order to satisfy perceived documentation requirements for review purposes.

    The second implication is that standard setters should be aware that the type and/or scope of the assurance engagement might also vary by jurisdiction. For example, in a jurisdiction with a close book-tax alignment, the clients’ and users’ expectations about the type and scope of assurance may interact with the prescribed standards in shaping audit practice.

    For more information on this study, please contact Niels van Nieuw Amerongen.

    Citation:

    Van Buuren, J., C. Koch, N. v. Nieuw Amerongen, and A. M. Wright. 2014. The Use of Business Risk Audit Perspectives by Non-Big 4 Audit Firms. Auditing: A Journal of Practice and Theory 33 (3): 105-128

  • Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips
    Waves of Global Standardization: Small Practitioners’ R...
    research summary posted June 15, 2016 by Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips, tagged 01.0 Standard Setting, 01.03 Impact of New Accounting Pronouncements 
    Title:
    Waves of Global Standardization: Small Practitioners’ Resilience and Intra-Professional Fragmentation within the Accounting Profession
    Practical Implications:

     At the empirical level, this analysis brings the impact of global standardization on local communities of small accounting practitioners to the fore. The authors have found that accounting and auditing research has neglected both small practitioners and the impact of resilience in accounting and auditing research. At the theoretical level, this paper is the first to mobilize the notion of resilience in accounting and auditing research. It is the hope of the authors that this study will lead to a qualitative study of the formation of small practitioners’ habitus – how they are socialized in taking up the role of docile actors who tend to be obedient to their profession’s formal authorities, highly skilled in technical thinking, and not too demanding in terms of requiring justifications.

    Citation:

    Durocher, S., Y. Gendron, and C. Picard. 2016. Waves of Global Standardization: Small Practitioners’ Resilience and Intra-Professional Fragmentation within the Accounting Profession. Auditing: A journal of Practice and Theory 35 (1): 65-88. 

  • Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips
    When the PCAOB Talks, Who Listens? Evidence from Stakeholder...
    research summary posted September 14, 2015 by Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips, tagged 01.0 Standard Setting, 01.06 Impact of PCAOB, 11.0 Audit Quality and Quality Control, 11.10 Impact of Quality Reviewers, 11.11 Impact of Firm and External Inspection Programs, 12.0 Accountants’ Reports and Reporting, 12.04 Investigations 
    Title:
    When the PCAOB Talks, Who Listens? Evidence from Stakeholder Reaction to GAAP-Deficient PCAOB Inspection Reports of Small Auditors.
    Practical Implications:

    The authors provide initial empirical evidence that Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) registrants found GAAP-deficient PCAOB inspection reports to be a useful signal of audit quality for triennially inspected auditors. This evidence indicates that PCAOB inspection reports created heterogeneity in auditor brand name that did not previously exist. Also, this paper is the first to empirically link audit committee characteristics to PCAOB inspection report severity and auditor choice. The authors believe this is an increasingly relevant finding as audit committees have been granted much greater auditor dismissal and hiring authority due to SOX. This study indicates that a PCAOB inspection report may serve as an audit quality signal for auditors of broker-dealers, who were previously exempt from the inspection process. Such a finding has current relevance given the PCAOB has recently sought to expand the inspection program to foreign auditors, such as those based in China whose clients are cross-listed on U.S. security exchanges or are listed due to a reverse merger.

    Citation:

    Abbott, L. J., K. A. Gunny, and T. C. Zhang. 2013. When the PCAOB Talks, Who Listens? Evidence from Stakeholder Reaction to GAAP-Deficient PCAOB Inspection Reports of Small Auditors. Auditing: A Journal of Practice & Theory 32 (2): 1-31.

  • Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips
    Who Did the Audit? Audit Quality and Disclosures of Other...
    research summary posted October 19, 2015 by Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips, tagged 01.0 Standard Setting, 01.02 Changes in Audit Standards, 11.0 Audit Quality and Quality Control 
    Title:
    Who Did the Audit? Audit Quality and Disclosures of Other Audit Participants in PCAOB Filings.
    Practical Implications:

    The study results are important to regulators and audit practitioners as they show the differential audit quality for participating auditors used in issuer audits. The results show that audit quality declines when audit engagements use participating auditors that are not experienced in auditing SEC issuers. This indicates that public disclosure of the principal and participating auditors in the audit report can provide useful information to evaluate audit quality.  

    Citation:

    Dee, C.C., A. Lulseged, and T. Zhang. 2015. Who Did the Audit? Audit Quality and Disclosures of Other Audit Participants in PCAOB Filings. The Accounting Review 90 (5): 1939-1967.

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