Auditing Section Research Summaries Space

A Database of Auditing Research - Building Bridges with Practice

This is a public Custom Hive  public

Posts

  • Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips
    Audit Committee Director-Auditor Interlocking and...
    research summary posted March 2, 2015 by Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips, tagged 01.0 Standard Setting, 01.05 Impact of SOX, 13.0 Governance, 13.02 Board/Financial Experts, 14.0 Corporate Matters, 14.11 Audit Committee Effectiveness 
    Title:
    Audit Committee Director-Auditor Interlocking and Perceptions of Earnings Quality
    Practical Implications:

    This study is important to provide an insight into the personal relationships and familiarity between audit committee directors and external auditors in terms of auditor independence. Furthermore, our examination of AC director-auditor interlocking provides a more complete basis for understanding the effectiveness of corporate governance in guarding earnings quality. The results not only support the view that AC director-auditor interlocking positively affects investors’ perception of earnings quality, but also support the regulatory requirement that audit committees include at least one financial expert.

    For more information on this study, please contact Jeng-Fang Chen.

    Citation:

    Chen, J.-F., Y.-Y. Chou, R.-R. Duh, and Y.-C. Lin. 2014. Audit committee director-auditor interlocking and perceptions of earnings quality. Auditing: A Journal of Practice and Theory 33 (4): 41-70

  • Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips
    CEO Power, Internal Control Quality, and Audit Committee...
    research summary posted October 12, 2016 by Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips, tagged 13.0 Governance, 13.02 Board/Financial Experts, 14.0 Corporate Matters, 14.11 Audit Committee Effectiveness 
    Title:
    CEO Power, Internal Control Quality, and Audit Committee Effectiveness in Substance versus in Form
    Practical Implications:

     The findings of this paper have significant policy implications and are important to shareholders. While regulators have set rules to improve audit committee effectiveness, the reforms may not change the substantive effectiveness in certain cases, one case being that the CEO has too much power. The authors provide empirical evidence showing that the negative association between audit committee financial expertise and internal control weaknesses becomes weak when the CEO is powerful. The result implies requiring audit committee to possess certain characteristics, such as financial expertise and fully independence, may not be sufficient to strengthen the underlying substance of monitoring effectiveness. The findings are consistent with evidences from survey and interview studies that argue top management ultimately determine the effectiveness of audit committee. The authors also show a powerful CEO can affect the substantive effectiveness even though he/she is prohibited from selecting audit committee members under the SOX Act. Finally, the findings raise concerns over the common practice of CEO duality in the U.S. A CEO, being the chairman of the board at the same time, can adversely affect audit committee effectiveness.

    Citation:

    Lisic, L. L., T. L. Neal, I. X. Zhang, and Y. Zhang. 2016. CEO Power, Internal Control Quality, and Audit Committee Effectiveness in Substance versus in Form. Contemporary Accounting Research 33 (3): 1199–1237.

  • Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips
    Chief Audit Executives Assessment of Internal Auditors’ P...
    research summary posted February 17, 2015 by Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips, tagged 13.0 Governance, 13.07 Internal auditor role and involvement in controls and reporting, 14.0 Corporate Matters, 14.11 Audit Committee Effectiveness 
    Title:
    Chief Audit Executives Assessment of Internal Auditors’ Performance Attributes by Professional Rank and Cultural Cluster
    Practical Implications:

    These results suggest that a generic profile for internal auditors, regardless of industry, may be in order. However, for a small minority of the attributes for which industry may have effects, industry-specific guidance may be appropriate. This conclusion suggests future studies of industry-specific effects for the purpose of developing industry-specific guidance. The IIA’s (2009) Internal Auditor Competency Framework has no industry-specific guidance, and it has indicated that such information will be added when available.

    An interesting finding in the study is that attributes such as financial analysis, research skills, and statistical sampling that have theoretical appeal to the practice of internal auditing were not selected by the CAEs as most important attributes. This result may be an artifact of limiting the selection of the attributes to the top five from each category of behavioral, technical, and competencies. The differences may also be due to the effects of culture.

    For more information on this study, please contact Mohammad J. Abdolmohammadi

    Citation:

    Abdolmohammadi, M.J. 2012. Chief Audit Executives Assessment of Internal Auditors’ Performance Attributes by Professional Rank and Cultural Cluster. Behavioral Research in Accounting 24(1): 1-23.

  • Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips
    Correlates of Co-Sourcing/Outsourcing of Internal Audit...
    research summary posted February 20, 2015 by Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips, tagged 13.0 Governance, 13.07 Internal auditor role and involvement in controls and reporting, 14.0 Corporate Matters, 14.11 Audit Committee Effectiveness 
    Title:
    Correlates of Co-Sourcing/Outsourcing of Internal Audit Activities
    Practical Implications:

    The primary result that audit committee involvement is significantly and positively associated with “outsourcing” is an important finding that suggests a need for management to pay close attention to the role that audit committee plays in “outsourcing” internal audit activities. The significance of value-added-activities, missing-skill-set, and audit-staff-vacancies on “outsourcing” also require management attention because collectively these three variables indicate trade-offs between acquiring the expertise in-house or “outsourcing” to external service providers.

    For more information on this study, please contact Mohammad Abdolmohammadi

    Citation:

    Abdolmohammadi, M. 2013. Correlates of Co-Sourcing/Outsourcing of Internal Audit Activities. Auditing: A Journal of Practice and Theory 32(3): 69-85.

  • Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips
    How Do Regulatory Reforms to Enhance Auditor Independence...
    research summary posted July 29, 2015 by Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips, tagged 04.0 Independence and Ethics, 04.02 Impact of Fees on Decisions by Auditors & Management, 04.07 Audit Firm Rotation, 14.0 Corporate Matters, 14.11 Audit Committee Effectiveness 
    Title:
    How Do Regulatory Reforms to Enhance Auditor Independence Work in Practice?
    Practical Implications:

    This study sheds light on what underlies decision making in the imperative audit committee responsibility of auditor appointment: nuanced interactions and power asymmetry among management, the audit committee, and auditors. The auditors viewed the CFO as the client and tailored the proposal accordingly. The audit committee will not be effective unless both auditors and audit committee members fundamentally change their mindsets about their respective roles in relation to client management. As large public companies employ multiple Big 4 firm, the viability of severing existing relationships to bring in a truly independent auditor mindset through audit firm rotation is questionable.

    Citation:

    Fiolleau, K., Hoang, K., Jamal, K., & Sunder, S. 2013. How Do Regulatory Reforms to Enhance Auditor Independence Work in Practice? Contemporary Accounting Research 30 (3): 864-890.

  • Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips
    Managers’ Strategic Reporting Judgments in Audit N...
    research summary posted August 31, 2016 by Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips, tagged 10.0 Engagement Management, 10.04 Interactions with Client Management, 13.0 Governance, 13.05 Board/Audit Committee Oversight, 14.0 Corporate Matters, 14.11 Audit Committee Effectiveness 
    Title:
    Managers’ Strategic Reporting Judgments in Audit Negotiations
    Practical Implications:

     The results of this study are important to consider when examining the effects of the audit committee on managers’ judgments. This study identifies the changes to the reporting environment stemming from the implementation of SOX, particularly with respect to communications between auditors and the audit committee and the authority and responsibility of the audit committee. This study adds insight to prior archival research that suggests that audit committees considered to be effective are associated with greater financial reporting quality. Further, these findings suggest that managers act as if auditors and audit committees that jointly resist management pressures to engage in aggressive reporting play important roles in ensuring high financial reporting quality.

    Citation:

     Brown-Liburd, H., A. Wright and V. Zamora. 2016. Managers’ Strategic Reporting Judgments in Audit Negotiations. Auditing, A Journal of Practice and Theory 35 (2): 47-64.

  • Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips
    Market Reaction to Auditor Ratification Vote Tally
    research summary posted April 19, 2017 by Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips, tagged 14.0 Corporate Matters, 14.11 Audit Committee Effectiveness 
    Title:
    Market Reaction to Auditor Ratification Vote Tally
    Practical Implications:

    This study provides empirical evidence that suggests that auditor ratification vote tallies are informative to the market. First, higher auditor ratification disapproval is associated with a more negative stock market reaction to the announcement of the vote tallies, consistent with the argument that this reflects negative investor perception of the auditor. Second, the authors provide evidence that the market reacts positively to an auditor change when there is high shareholder disapproval, and that audit and auditor characteristics moderate or exacerbate the market reaction in a way that suggests the market finds the ratification vote informative, but does not fully price it. 

    Citation:

    Tanyi, P. N. and K. C. Roland. 2017. Market Reaction to Auditor Ratification Vote Tally. Accounting Horizons 31 (1): 141 – 157. 

  • The Auditing Section
    On the Constitution of Audit Committee Effectiveness
    research summary posted May 3, 2012 by The Auditing Section, tagged 13.0 Governance, 13.06 Board/Audit Committee Processes, 14.0 Corporate Matters, 14.11 Audit Committee Effectiveness 
    Title:
    On the Constitution of Audit Committee Effectiveness
    Practical Implications:

    The results of this study are important for regulators when considering corporate governance processes and governance disclosures.  This study also provides insight into the importance of small events surrounding audit committee meetings, such as members’ style of questioning and insistence on managers swiftly adopting corrective measures to solve problems highlighted in internal audit reports.  The results provide insights into the process with which audit committee attendees define their effectiveness.  The results call into question the effectiveness of recent regulatory attempts to strengthen formal disclosures.

    Citation:

    Gendron,Y., and J. Bédard. 2006. On the constitution of audit committee effectiveness. Accounting, Organizations and Society 31(3):
    211-239.

    Home:
    home button
  • Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips
    Regulation and the interdependent roles of managers,...
    research summary posted February 17, 2016 by Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips, tagged 01.0 Standard Setting, 14.0 Corporate Matters, 14.01 Earnings Management, 14.11 Audit Committee Effectiveness 
    Title:
    Regulation and the interdependent roles of managers, auditors, and directors in earnings management and accounting choice.
    Practical Implications:

    This review paper provides an overview of how financial reporting, auditing, and corporate governance regulations influence the earnings management and accounting choice decisions of key stakeholders. The paper provides a summary of key insights (summarized above) of interest to practitioners, researchers, and regulators. Further, the paper highlights the key benefits of experimental and survey work in terms of identifying causal mechanisms and investigating the impact of potential regulatory actions not yet in existence.

    Citation:

    Libby, R., K. Rennekamp, and N. Seybert. 2015. Regulation and the interdependent roles of managers, auditors, and directors in earnings management and accounting choice. Accounting, Organizations and Society 47: 25-42.

  • Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips
    Rotational internal audit programs and financial reporting...
    research summary posted October 21, 2015 by Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips, tagged 13.0 Governance, 13.07 Internal auditor role and involvement in controls and reporting, 14.0 Corporate Matters, 14.11 Audit Committee Effectiveness 
    Title:
    Rotational internal audit programs and financial reporting quality: Do compensating controls help?
    Practical Implications:

    Results from this study suggest that rotating internal auditors into operational management programs reduces financial reporting quality. Companies that utilize a rotational internal audit program should be aware of these possible unintended consequences. Companies utilizing these programs should consider implementing several compensating controls (listed in the findings section), as the authors have found that these controls can reduce or even eliminate (if used together) the negative consequences of rotational internal audit programs.  

    Citation:

    Christ, M.H., A. Masli, N.Y. Sharp, and D.A. Wood. 2015. Rotational internal audit programs and financial reporting quality: Do compensating controls help? Accounting, Organizations and Society 44: 37-59.

Filter by Type

Filter by Tag