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  • Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips
    The Effect of the Social Mismatch between Staff Auditors and...
    research summary posted April 17, 2014 by Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips, tagged 09.0 Auditor Judgment, 09.03 Adequacy of Evidence, 10.0 Engagement Management, 10.04 Interactions with Client Management, 11.0 Audit Quality and Quality Control, 11.03 Management/Staff Interaction 
    Title:
    The Effect of the Social Mismatch between Staff Auditors and Client Management on the Collection of Audit Evidence
    Practical Implications:

    Given the extent of audit evidence collected by young staff auditors, the findings of this study have direct implications for workpaper and audit quality. The mismatch of age, experience, and knowledge between staff-level auditors and client management can result in a potentially intimidating situation for the staff-level auditor, and impact decisions made in collecting information and conducting testwork. These results provide new evidence regarding the impact of auditor-client interactions on audit quality. This suggests that firms may want to consider how to manage these social mismatches of their staff.

    For more information on this study, please contact G. Bradley Bennett.
     

    Citation:

    Bennett, G. B., and R. C. Hatfield. 2013. The Effect of the Social Mismatch between Staff Auditors and Client Management on the Collection of Audit Evidence. The Accounting Review 88 (1): 31–50.

  • Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips
    Fraudulent Management Explanations and the Impact of...
    research summary posted September 19, 2013 by Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips, tagged 06.0 Risk and Risk Management, Including Fraud Risk, 06.01 Fraud Risk Assessment, 09.0 Auditor Judgment, 09.03 Adequacy of Evidence, 11.0 Audit Quality and Quality Control, 11.09 Evaluation of Evidence 
    Title:
    Fraudulent Management Explanations and the Impact of Alternative Presentations of Client Business Evidence
    Practical Implications:

    The study provides evidence that the format of the audit evidence (using the business model evidence versus using the chronological evidence) impacts the level of fraud risk assessment.  This indicates that using the business model provides an advantage in evaluating and assessing the potential risk of fraud.  The advantages of using both forms of evidence may enable auditors to determine the nature, timing and extent of procedures to corroborate management’s explanations for fluctuations beyond the context of fraud.  Therefore, the findings of this study have broader implications, as it can be applied to other audit procedures to ensure that auditors are obtaining sufficient evidence throughout the audit as well as for an assessment of fraud risk.


    For more information on this study, please contact William F. Wright.
     

    Citation:

    Wright, W.F., and L. Berger. 2011. Fraudulent Management Explanations and the Impact of Alternative Presentations of Client Business Evidence.   Auditing:  A Journal of Practice and Theory 30 (2): 153-171.

  • Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips
    Triangulation of audit evidence in fraud risk assessments
    research summary posted June 21, 2013 by Jennifer M Mueller-Phillips, tagged 06.0 Risk and Risk Management, Including Fraud Risk, 06.01 Fraud Risk Assessment, 09.0 Auditor Judgment, 09.03 Adequacy of Evidence, 11.0 Audit Quality and Quality Control, 11.09 Evaluation of Evidence 
    Title:
    Triangulation of audit evidence in fraud risk assessments
    Practical Implications:

    Given the level of regulatory scrutiny surrounding auditor judgment and skepticism of audit evidence, the results indicate that when assessing the risk of fraud, there is a lack of reliance on third party evidence, particularly when management provides a compelling story with its internal evidence.  The results of this study are important in enhancing awareness for auditors to use and corroborate both internal and external audit evidence for purposes of assessing and supporting the level of risk of the audit client.  In addition, in a broader context, the same could be said regarding the evaluation of evidence for purposes of procedures throughout the various stages of the audit process.

    Citation:

    Trotman, K.T., and W.F. Wright. 2012. Triangulation of audit evidence in fraud risk assessments. Accounting, Organization and Society 37: 41-53. 

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  • The Auditing Section
    The Influence of Auditor Experience on the Persuasiveness of...
    research summary posted April 16, 2012 by The Auditing Section, tagged 07.0 Internal Control, 07.01 Scope of Testing, 09.0 Auditor Judgment, 09.03 Adequacy of Evidence, 09.10 Prior Dispositions/Biases/Auditor state of mind 
    Title:
    The Influence of Auditor Experience on the Persuasiveness of Information Provided by Management
    Practical Implications:

    The extent to which auditors’ judgments are persuaded by information from management represents asignificant issue for audit practice, especially when information from more objective sources is also available.  The evidence indicates that less experienced senior auditors rely on information from management that is aligned with management’s self-interest to a greater extent than more experienced audit seniors.  This reliance raises a concern that some senior auditors assess audit evidence more favorably than may be warranted because they inappropriately rely on information provided by management. A lack of appropriate skepticism has the potential to make audits ineffective and expose the firm to audit failures.  The study suggests the importance of carefully assigning audit tasks to auditors with an appropriate level of experience.

    Citation:

    Kaplan, S. E., E. F. O’Donnell, and B. M. Arel. 2008. The Influence of Auditor Experience on the Persuasiveness of Information Provided by Management. Auditing: A Journal of Practice & Theory 27 (1): 67-83.

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  • The Auditing Section
    Auditors’ Assessment and Incorporation of Expectation P...
    research summary posted April 13, 2012 by The Auditing Section, tagged 08.0 Auditing Procedures – Nature, Timing and Extent, 09.0 Auditor Judgment, 09.03 Adequacy of Evidence 
    Title:
    Auditors’ Assessment and Incorporation of Expectation Precision in Evidential Analytical Procedures
    Practical Implications:

    The results of this study suggest that auditors’ precision assessments may not be well calibrated for relevant precision factors. Thus, auditors may benefit from additional guidance indicating the factors that should be considered for assessing the precision of analytical
    procedures.  Furthermore, audit firms might want to consider integrating some of the findings of this study into future training sessions and/or decision aids that would assist auditors in improving their precision calibration. An insensitivity to important precision factors may lead to over-reliance on analytical procedures, negatively affecting audit effectiveness. Because the allowance for loan losses is an estimate, the results of this study provide insight into factors that could influence the potential effectiveness of audits of estimates. Understanding how auditors evaluate analytical procedure precision for estimates is particularly critical in that analytical procedures may be the only source of assurance for testing these accounts.

    Citation:

    McDaniel, L.S. and L.E. Simmons. 2007. Auditors’ assessment and incorporation of expectation precision in evidential analytical procedures. Auditing: A Journal of Practice & Theory 26(1): 1-18.

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  • The Auditing Section
    An Investigation of Auditor Perceptions about Subsequent...
    research summary posted April 13, 2012 by The Auditing Section, tagged 01.0 Standard Setting, 01.07 Impact of SEC Actions, 09.0 Auditor Judgment, 09.03 Adequacy of Evidence 
    Title:
    An Investigation of Auditor Perceptions about Subsequent Events and Factors That Influence This Audit Task
    Practical Implications:

    Auditors should recognize that an implicit tradeoff exists between the availability of subsequent event evidence and timelier reporting.  However, the net effect is not well understood because prior research has only focused on quantifying the benefits of timely reporting, not the costs associated with obtaining less subsequent event evidence.  The low evidence discovery rate reported by participants suggests that the current audit methodology might suffer from inefficiencies.  Further research should establish relative frequency information to help auditors generate hypotheses and guide audit planning.

     

    Citation:

    Janvrin, D. J. and C. G. Jeffrey. 2007. An Investigation of Auditor Perceptions about Subsequent Events and Factors That Influence This Audit Task.  Accounting Horizons 21 (3):  295-312

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  • The Auditing Section
    Covariation Assessments with Costly Information Collection...
    research summary posted April 16, 2012 by The Auditing Section, tagged 09.0 Auditor Judgment, 09.03 Adequacy of Evidence 
    Title:
    Covariation Assessments with Costly Information Collection in Audit Planning: An Experimental Study
    Practical Implications:

    The study has significant implications for situations where auditors must make decisions based on preliminary analyses (i.e. analytical procedures). From this analysis they either pass or extend testing on the accounts under review. In the absence of guidance on the importance of subjecting all accounts and transactions to testing, auditors may tend to over (under) test in response to greater (lesser) sensitivity of an account to error (based on the preliminary testing). The ineffectiveness and inefficiencies that may result are potentially greater when transactions to be tested are chosen judgmentally. 

    Citation:

    Ganguly, A.R. and J. S. Hammersley. 2009. Covariation Assessments with Costly Information Collection in Audit Planning: An Experimental Study. Auditing: A Journal of Practice and Theory 28(1):1-27.

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  • The Auditing Section
    Auditors’ Assessment and Incorporation of Expectation P...
    research summary posted April 16, 2012 by The Auditing Section, tagged 08.0 Auditing Procedures – Nature, Timing and Extent, 09.0 Auditor Judgment, 09.03 Adequacy of Evidence 
    Title:
    Auditors’ Assessment and Incorporation of Expectation Precision in Evidential Analytical Procedures
    Practical Implications:

    The results of this study suggest that auditors’ precision assessments may not be well calibrated for relevant precision factors. Thus, auditors may benefit from additional guidance indicating the factors that should be considered for assessing the precision of analytical
    procedures.  Furthermore, audit firms might want to consider integrating some of the findings of this study into future training sessions and/or decision aids that would assist auditors in improving their precision calibration. An insensitivity to important precision factors may lead to over-reliance on analytical procedures, negatively affecting audit effectiveness. Because the allowance for loan losses is an estimate, the results of this study provide insight into factors that could influence the potential effectiveness of audits of estimates. Understanding how auditors evaluate analytical procedure precision for estimates is particularly critical in that analytical procedures may be the only source of assurance for testing these accounts.

    Citation:

    McDaniel, L.S. and L.E. Simmons. 2007. Auditors’ assessment and incorporation of expectation precision in evidential analytical
    procedures. Auditing: A Journal of Practice & Theory 26(1): 1-18.

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