Comments

Comments

  • GABRIELA FARIAS-MARTINEZ

    Hi! 

    I am Chair of Accounting and Finance Departament, at Tecnológico de Monterrey, MEXICO

    We are very interested in participate in this initiative, it is still working for new institutions?

    Thank you very much!

  • Robert E Jensen

    Ancient Inca Accounting and Messaging
    How the Inca Used Intricately-Knotted Cords, Called Khipu, to Write Their Histories, Send Messages & Keep Records
    ---
    http://www.openculture.com/2018/11/inca-used-intricately-knotted-cords-called-khipu-write-histories-keep-records.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+OpenCulture+%28Open+Culture%29

    Bob Jensen's threads on accountancy history ---
    http://faculty.trinity.edu/rjensen/theory01.htm#AccountingHistory

  • Robert E Jensen

    From a Chronicle of Higher Education Newsletter on November 27, 2018

    I’m Goldie Blumenstyk, a senior writer at The Chronicle of Higher Education covering innovation in and around academe. Here’s what I’m thinking about this week:

    Thoughts on the rise of the mega-university

    A few weeks ago, when I wrote about Southern New Hampshire University, I called it a forerunner of a new breed of institution, the nonprofit mega-university. Now I have a confession to make: I’m still not exactly sure what that means, or what it could lead to.

    But it’s obvious to me, and to others I spoke with in the course of reporting that article, that the emergence of mega-universities — institutions like Southern New Hampshire and Western Governors University, with big online footprints, a heavy reliance on adjuncts, and standardized curricular models — will change how higher education is provided.

    Other colleges, with smaller online programs, are already feeling the pricing pressure and competitive impact, and those that have yet to enter that arena could find it harder and harder to get any traction. In the words of Russell Poulin, director of policy and analysis for the WICHE Cooperative for Educational Technologies, “The University of Whatever doing one more M.B.A., that’s going to be hard.”

    “Hard,” Poulin argues, shouldn’t mean that every University of Whatever has to throw in the online towel. But it probably means they’ll need to plan with intentionality. As Poulin puts it, a Walmart coming into a small community will often crush local retailers, but “local restaurants can thrive next to chains” by being more attuned to local demands and tastes. Colleges will have to find the educational equivalents.

    In the future, Poulin contends, colleges won’t be able to just opt out of online education. “It will be an expected option of a modern college or university,” he says, even if it takes on a different form than the model the behemoths offer.

    Mega-universities could do more than change the market for students or alter the nature of faculty roles. That’s where things could get even more interesting.

    As the author and higher-education consultant Michael B. Horn suggests, institutions like Southern New Hampshire and Western Governors “could help change the definition of quality” for online education, but only if they can show that their students are getting consistently great outcomes. “That,” Horn says, “would be a good game changer for the field.”

    I think Horn is onto something. One of the biggest missed opportunities from the era when big for-profit universities dominated the online-education scene was their failure to capitalize on all the learning data they were collecting from their students. By dint of their size and sophistication, they had rich sets of data and, even several years ago, at least some rudimentary tools to analyze it.

    Yet for the most part, those colleges used the information for their own proprietary purposes rather than to demonstrate, in any transparent or consistent manner, that their education models were effective. (I can imagine many readers thinking, “They never showed that because they couldn’t.” I’ll stop short of saying that. But if they had the data to prove otherwise, few shared it.)


    It remains to be seen how the big nonprofit online players will approach matters. But as you might have sensed from the Southern New Hampshire story, I see a heartening early sign in the reporting on student outcomes that Western Governors has adopted. In its
    annual report, the university, which now enrolls more than 100,000 students, published a chart showing trends in its six-year graduation rate and a comparison to a national-average graduation rate for nonselective, nonprofit institutions.

    That may not be a perfect measure. But as WGU’s president, Scott Pulsipher, told me, “even an imperfect measure, consistently tracked,” is valuable because it will show improvements or failings.

    Pulsipher told me that he believes it’s important to report data on student outcomes. “You can buy awareness,” he said, “but you earn reputation.”

    The things WGU measures — graduation rates, students’ debt loads upon graduation, salary boosts — are valuable but not enough. And online or not, “good” measures of academic quality are still all too elusive. (For his part, Paul LeBlanc, Southern New Hampshire’s president, says one goal he sets for his institution is that “people leave us in better financial condition than when they came in.”)

    I wish I had better answers. Maybe you do. With the higher-ed landscape becoming increasingly dominated by big online operators, what are the (realistic!) measures of quality that they could be assessing and highlighting? Any other great examples of institutions that have found a way to demonstrate quality? Please send me your thoughts, and I’ll share what I hear.

    As Horn puts it, we’re still “in the early innings” of the mega-university era. Certainly, institutions like SNHU and WGU could stumble, or, as with the British Open University (perhaps the first nonprofit mega-university, which was
    once a source of inspiration for American colleges exploring distance education), fall victim to internal and outside forces and suffer enrollment and reputational declines. But I doubt this trend will reverse itself, unless of course the institutions fail to step up to the challenge. In other words, and with apologies to Voltaire (and Spiderman), with great size comes great responsibility. The question is: How well will they take it on?

    Continued in article

    Bob Jensen's threads on competency testing for academic credit ---
    http://faculty.trinity.edu/rjensen/assess.htm#ConceptKnowledge

  • Robert E Jensen

    From a Chronicle of Higher Education Newsletter on November 27, 2018

    I’m Goldie Blumenstyk, a senior writer at The Chronicle of Higher Education covering innovation in and around academe. Here’s what I’m thinking about this week:

    Thoughts on the rise of the mega-university

    A few weeks ago, when I wrote about Southern New Hampshire University, I called it a forerunner of a new breed of institution, the nonprofit mega-university. Now I have a confession to make: I’m still not exactly sure what that means, or what it could lead to.

    But it’s obvious to me, and to others I spoke with in the course of reporting that article, that the emergence of mega-universities — institutions like Southern New Hampshire and Western Governors University, with big online footprints, a heavy reliance on adjuncts, and standardized curricular models — will change how higher education is provided.

    Other colleges, with smaller online programs, are already feeling the pricing pressure and competitive impact, and those that have yet to enter that arena could find it harder and harder to get any traction. In the words of Russell Poulin, director of policy and analysis for the WICHE Cooperative for Educational Technologies, “The University of Whatever doing one more M.B.A., that’s going to be hard.”

    “Hard,” Poulin argues, shouldn’t mean that every University of Whatever has to throw in the online towel. But it probably means they’ll need to plan with intentionality. As Poulin puts it, a Walmart coming into a small community will often crush local retailers, but “local restaurants can thrive next to chains” by being more attuned to local demands and tastes. Colleges will have to find the educational equivalents.

    In the future, Poulin contends, colleges won’t be able to just opt out of online education. “It will be an expected option of a modern college or university,” he says, even if it takes on a different form than the model the behemoths offer.

    Mega-universities could do more than change the market for students or alter the nature of faculty roles. That’s where things could get even more interesting.

    As the author and higher-education consultant Michael B. Horn suggests, institutions like Southern New Hampshire and Western Governors “could help change the definition of quality” for online education, but only if they can show that their students are getting consistently great outcomes. “That,” Horn says, “would be a good game changer for the field.”

    I think Horn is onto something. One of the biggest missed opportunities from the era when big for-profit universities dominated the online-education scene was their failure to capitalize on all the learning data they were collecting from their students. By dint of their size and sophistication, they had rich sets of data and, even several years ago, at least some rudimentary tools to analyze it.

    Yet for the most part, those colleges used the information for their own proprietary purposes rather than to demonstrate, in any transparent or consistent manner, that their education models were effective. (I can imagine many readers thinking, “They never showed that because they couldn’t.” I’ll stop short of saying that. But if they had the data to prove otherwise, few shared it.)


    It remains to be seen how the big nonprofit online players will approach matters. But as you might have sensed from the Southern New Hampshire story, I see a heartening early sign in the reporting on student outcomes that Western Governors has adopted. In its
    annual report, the university, which now enrolls more than 100,000 students, published a chart showing trends in its six-year graduation rate and a comparison to a national-average graduation rate for nonselective, nonprofit institutions.

    That may not be a perfect measure. But as WGU’s president, Scott Pulsipher, told me, “even an imperfect measure, consistently tracked,” is valuable because it will show improvements or failings.

    Pulsipher told me that he believes it’s important to report data on student outcomes. “You can buy awareness,” he said, “but you earn reputation.”

    The things WGU measures — graduation rates, students’ debt loads upon graduation, salary boosts — are valuable but not enough. And online or not, “good” measures of academic quality are still all too elusive. (For his part, Paul LeBlanc, Southern New Hampshire’s president, says one goal he sets for his institution is that “people leave us in better financial condition than when they came in.”)

    I wish I had better answers. Maybe you do. With the higher-ed landscape becoming increasingly dominated by big online operators, what are the (realistic!) measures of quality that they could be assessing and highlighting? Any other great examples of institutions that have found a way to demonstrate quality? Please send me your thoughts, and I’ll share what I hear.

    As Horn puts it, we’re still “in the early innings” of the mega-university era. Certainly, institutions like SNHU and WGU could stumble, or, as with the British Open University (perhaps the first nonprofit mega-university, which was
    once a source of inspiration for American colleges exploring distance education), fall victim to internal and outside forces and suffer enrollment and reputational declines. But I doubt this trend will reverse itself, unless of course the institutions fail to step up to the challenge. In other words, and with apologies to Voltaire (and Spiderman), with great size comes great responsibility. The question is: How well will they take it on?

    Continued in article

    Bob Jensen's threads on competency testing for academic credit ---
    http://faculty.trinity.edu/rjensen/assess.htm#ConceptKnowledge

  • Robert E Jensen

    Instilling Historical Perspective and a Critical Faculty in the First Undergraduate Course in Financial Accounting
    Issues in Accounting Education
    Article Volume 33, Issue 3 (August 2018)
    http://aaajournals.org/doi/full/10.2308/iace-51970

    This article explains how the author discovered his interest in accounting history, and how he used his research and readings in history to enliven his more than 50 years of teaching introductory financial accounting to undergraduates. He then presents nine illustrations of how he has brought historical background and a critical mien into his lectures and discussion sessions with students, in the hope that colleagues elsewhere might consider doing likewise.

    MY SELF-DISCOVERY

    MY TEACHING PHILOSOPHY

    ILLUSTRATIONS (by far the longest part of the paper)

    CONCLUSION

    Jensen Comment
    This article is heavily autobiographical regarding his long and very devoted career. We can truly say that Steve gave and still gives his all to his (our) profession.


     

    A Critical View of the Evolution of the Accounting Professoriate

     

    SSRN
    https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3257438
    27 Pages Posted: 2 Oct 2018  

    Stephen A. Zeff

    Rice University - Jesse H. Jones Graduate School of Business

    Date Written: September 29, 2018

    Abstract

    The first two-thirds of this paper is a review and analysis of the evolution of the accounting research and education environments, primarily in the United States but also with respect to Canada, from the 1960s to the present time. The final third of the paper consists of a critique of contemporary approaches to both accounting research and education.

     

     

    Keywords: Research, Methodology, Education, History

    JEL Classification: M41

  • Robert E Jensen

    Accounting Professors Rarely Give TED Talks
    Fraud researcher Kelly Richmond Pope shares lessons from some of history's high-profile whistle-blowers, people who've taken personal and career risk to point out corruption, crime and threats to security

    https://www.ted.com/talks/kelly_richmond_pope_how_whistle_blowers_shape_history?utm_source=newsletter_weekly_2018-10-13&utm_campaign=newsletter_weekly&utm_medium=email&utm_content=bottom_right_button
    Jensen Comment
    The SEC and IRS have reward programs for rewarding whistleblowers because these programs are often the most effective way of discovering fraud.

    What are the Methods of Detecting Fraud?
    https://www.accountingweb.com/practice/clients/what-are-the-methods-of-detecting-fraud?source=pe101218


    AICPA:  Municipal fraud is a rampant, and often preventable, crime that affects communities across the country ---
    https://www.journalofaccountancy.com/newsletters/2018/oct/lessons-learned-municipal-fraud-cases.html?utm_source=mnl:cpald&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=08Oct2018

    Jensen Comment
    It's a mistake to save money by weakening internal controls. There's a lot of focus on administrators who engage in these frauds. But in many (most?) it's elected officials who take advantage of their powers to take bribes and kickbacks. In big cities like Chicago, Detroit, and New Orleans bribes and kickbacks are routine rather than rare.

    Bob Jensen's Fraud updates --- http://faculty.trinity.edu/rjensen/FraudUpdates.htm
     

  • Robert E Jensen

    What are the Methods of Detecting Fraud?
    https://www.accountingweb.com/practice/clients/what-are-the-methods-of-detecting-fraud?source=pe101218


    AICPA:  Municipal fraud is a rampant, and often preventable, crime that affects communities across the country ---
    https://www.journalofaccountancy.com/newsletters/2018/oct/lessons-learned-municipal-fraud-cases.html?utm_source=mnl:cpald&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=08Oct2018

    Jensen Comment
    It's a mistake to save money by weakening internal controls. There's a lot of focus on administrators who engage in these frauds. But in many (most?) it's elected officials who take advantage of their powers to take bribes and kickbacks. In big cities like Chicago, Detroit, and New Orleans bribes and kickbacks are routine rather than rare.

    Bob Jensen's Fraud updates --- http://faculty.trinity.edu/rjensen/FraudUpdates.htm

  • Robert E Jensen

    The Guardian:  Why are so many YouTubers finding themselves stressed, lonely and exhausted? ---
    https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2018/sep/08/youtube-stars-burnout-fun-bleak-stressed

    Jensen Comment
    I hesitate to say that this is also a problem for bloggers, but most of the faculty bloggers in accountancy dropped out or greatly slowed down, including some of my favorites like The Grumpy Old Accountants, Accounting Education News, Accountinator, Accounting Cycle, Building Business Value, FraudBytes (nothing for nine months), MyEMBA, Pondering the Classroom, RandomThoughts (nothing in nine months), Really Engaging Accounting, Stephen Lynn's Blog, Stategic Management Accounting, Teaching Managerial Accounting, The Professor's Perspective, The Summa, The TaxDoc Spot, The Trite's E-Business Blog (Jerry still has a Zorba blog), The Accounting Coach, The XBRL Canada Blog, Thinking Outside the Box, Tic Marks, Análise de Balanço, Globaliconta, Ideias Contábeis, and Professor Lopes de Sá. The Accounting Onion is temporarily out of action, but it will probably return when Tom has fewer irons in the fire.

    I suspect virtually every other academic discipline had short-lived blogs by faculty who burned out of blogging or ceased blogging for whatever reasons.

    The AECM Listserv is a unique forum where accounting educators (and others) enter into debates as well as add news items. Many of the most active contributors, however, have dropped out such that there are many lurkers and only a few actives. I miss some of the former actives who liked to needle me and egg me on. I also miss some genuine experts who broadened my understanding of the world (like David Fordham) and some who were outrageous (like David Albrecht).

    What is really disappointing to me is that I can't think of an accounting educator from a prestigious university who blogs. Accountics scientists rarely stick their heads out of the ground. If I'm missing somebody here please let me know! They sometimes contribute working papers to SSRN, but the SSRN has a wall preventing interactive exchanges with authors. It's like they don't want to be bothered by readers.

    I really, really miss the Grumpy Old Accountants because they adopted the Abe Briloff (Barrons) style of criticizing published financial statements. I also miss Accounting Education News that kept me up to date on happenings on the other side of the pond.

  • Robert E Jensen

    The Guardian:  Why are so many YouTubers finding themselves stressed, lonely and exhausted? ---
    https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2018/sep/08/youtube-stars-burnout-fun-bleak-stressed

    Jensen Comment
    I hesitate to say that this is also a problem for bloggers, but most of the faculty bloggers in accountancy dropped out or greatly slowed down, including some of my favorites like The Grumpy Old Accountants, Accounting Education News, Accountinator, Accounting Cycle, Building Business Value, FraudBytes (nothing for nine months), MyEMBA, Pondering the Classroom, RandomThoughts (nothing in nine months), Really Engaging Accounting, Stephen Lynn's Blog, Stategic Management Accounting, Teaching Managerial Accounting, The Professor's Perspective, The Summa, The TaxDoc Spot, The Trite's E-Business Blog (Jerry still has a Zorba blog), The Accounting Coach, The XBRL Canada Blog, Thinking Outside the Box, Tic Marks, Análise de Balanço, Globaliconta, Ideias Contábeis, and Professor Lopes de Sá. The Accounting Onion is temporarily out of action, but it will probably return when Tom has fewer irons in the fire.

    I suspect virtually every other academic discipline had short-lived blogs by faculty who burned out of blogging or ceased blogging for whatever reasons.

    The AECM Listserv is a unique forum where accounting educators (and others) enter into debates as well as add news items. Many of the most active contributors, however, have dropped out such that there are many lurkers and only a few actives. I miss some of the former actives who liked to needle me and egg me on. I also miss some genuine experts who broadened my understanding of the world (like David Fordham) and some who were outrageous (like David Albrecht).

    What is really disappointing to me is that I can't think of an accounting educator from a prestigious university who blogs. Accountics scientists rarely stick their heads out of the ground. If I'm missing somebody here please let me know! They sometimes contribute working papers to SSRN, but the SSRN has a wall preventing interactive exchanges with authors. It's like they don't want to be bothered by readers.

    I really, really miss the Grumpy Old Accountants because they adopted the Abe Briloff (Barrons) style of criticizing published financial statements. I also miss Accounting Education News that kept me up to date on happenings on the other side of the pond.

  • Robert E Jensen

    Seven  of the coolest gadgets announced at Europe's biggest tech show of 2018 ---
    https://www.businessinsider.com/ifa-2018-coolest-gadgets-announcements-2018-8

    From the physics journal PhysOrg:  15 Incredibly Genius Gadgets That’ll Make Your Life Easier in 2018 ---
    http://www.ceeny.com/sponsored/trending-gadgets-2018/?gclid=EAIaIQobChMI4KPvmvT72QIVA5bICh0VMQgWEAEYASAAEgJn6_D_BwE

  • Robert E Jensen

    Harvard:  The Death of Supply Chain Management ---
    https://hbr.org/2018/06/the-death-of-supply-chain-management?utm_medium=email&utm_source=newsletter_weekly&utm_campaign=weeklyhotlist_not_activesubs&referral=00202&deliveryName=DM7738

    Jensen Comment
    Darn --- just when Walmart commenced to pay for college majors in this discipline

    Walmart’s too-good-to-be-true “$1 a day” college tuition plan, explained ---
    https://www.vox.com/2018/6/1/17413326/walmart-college-tuition-worker-pay-unemployment

    If headlines this week like “Walmart’s perk for workers: Go to college for $1 a day” (CNN) or “Walmart to offer employees a college education for $1 a day” (Washington Post) sound too good to be true, that’s because they largely are. The benefit is real, but it is much more restrictive than those headlines suggest. It’s essentially a bulk purchasing discount for a narrow range of online college courses.

    It’s also a telling benefit on a number of levels. The labor market is getting stronger, and employers are needing to think harder about how to invest in recruiting and retaining employees. But the old-fashioned strategy of paying more continues to be something corporate America resists, in part out of habit and in part because offering higher wages is a little more complicated than it looks. Companies like Walmart are, in essence, trying to get creative with their compensation packages in hopes of narrowly targeting the money they expend on the core goal of recruiting and retaining desirable workers.

    The question is whether policymakers will keep unemployment low long enough to break through the wall of resistance to across-the-board pay hikes and force big companies to finally just raise pay.

    Walmart’s actual tuition plan, explained

    The Walmart program is limited to online degree programs offered by three schools — the University of Florida, Brandman University, and Bellevue University — and specifically focused on bachelor’s or associate degrees in either business or supply chain management.

    You won’t, in other words, be able to do part-time shifts at Walmart to “pay your way through college” in the traditional sense.

    But qualifying Walmart employees (including both full-time and part-time workers who’ve been with the company for 90 days) will get discounted tuition, books, and access to a coach who will help them decide on an appropriate program and shepherd them through the application process

    It’s a nice opportunity for Walmart employees to gain a chance at upward mobility off the retail floor, and that’s likely the point. Unlike higher cash wages (which of course can be used for online college tuition as well as rent, gasoline, movie tickets, medical expenses, etc.), the tuition benefit is likely to be disproportionately appealing to people who are on the more ambitious end of the distribution. It’s an effort, in other words, to make Walmart more attractive specifically to the most appealing set of potential workers, a strategy other companies have pursued in recent years.

    Many large employers are trying tuition benefits

    Modest tuition programs have long been a staple of large employer benefits packages largely because of favorable tax treatment. The IRS allows employers to give employees several thousand dollars’ worth of tuition benefits tax-free, which makes establishing a program something of a no-brainer for most companies big enough to be employing a large back-office staff anyway.

    But four years ago, Starbucks blazed the trail of offering a much more ambitious reimbursement program that essentially offered taxable tuition subsidies rather than taxable wage increases.

    The reason: Academic research shows that workers who are interested in tuition subsidies are different from workers who are not. While everyone likes money, Peter Cappelli’s 2002 research indicates that the workers who like tuition subsidies are more productive than those who don’t, and Colleen Manchester’s 2012 research shows that subsidy-using employees have longer time horizons and are less likely to switch jobs.

    In March of this year, a consortium of big US hotels launched a generous tuition discount program, and later that month, McDonald’s substantially enhanced its tuition benefits. Kroger — another top five US employer — rolled out a new tuition program in April, and Chick-fil-A expanded its program in May.

    These initiatives differ in detail, but the broad story is the same. The unemployment rate is now low, so recruiting new staff is getting harder. Companies are looking to enhance their compensation but would like to do so in targeted ways.

    Continued in article

  • Robert E Jensen

    Harvard:  The Death of Supply Chain Management ---
    https://hbr.org/2018/06/the-death-of-supply-chain-management?utm_medium=email&utm_source=newsletter_weekly&utm_campaign=weeklyhotlist_not_activesubs&referral=00202&deliveryName=DM7738

    Jensen Comment
    Darn --- just when Walmart commenced to pay for college majors in this discipline

    Walmart’s too-good-to-be-true “$1 a day” college tuition plan, explained ---
    https://www.vox.com/2018/6/1/17413326/walmart-college-tuition-worker-pay-unemployment

    If headlines this week like “Walmart’s perk for workers: Go to college for $1 a day” (CNN) or “Walmart to offer employees a college education for $1 a day” (Washington Post) sound too good to be true, that’s because they largely are. The benefit is real, but it is much more restrictive than those headlines suggest. It’s essentially a bulk purchasing discount for a narrow range of online college courses.

    It’s also a telling benefit on a number of levels. The labor market is getting stronger, and employers are needing to think harder about how to invest in recruiting and retaining employees. But the old-fashioned strategy of paying more continues to be something corporate America resists, in part out of habit and in part because offering higher wages is a little more complicated than it looks. Companies like Walmart are, in essence, trying to get creative with their compensation packages in hopes of narrowly targeting the money they expend on the core goal of recruiting and retaining desirable workers.

    The question is whether policymakers will keep unemployment low long enough to break through the wall of resistance to across-the-board pay hikes and force big companies to finally just raise pay.

    Walmart’s actual tuition plan, explained

    The Walmart program is limited to online degree programs offered by three schools — the University of Florida, Brandman University, and Bellevue University — and specifically focused on bachelor’s or associate degrees in either business or supply chain management.

    You won’t, in other words, be able to do part-time shifts at Walmart to “pay your way through college” in the traditional sense.

    But qualifying Walmart employees (including both full-time and part-time workers who’ve been with the company for 90 days) will get discounted tuition, books, and access to a coach who will help them decide on an appropriate program and shepherd them through the application process

    It’s a nice opportunity for Walmart employees to gain a chance at upward mobility off the retail floor, and that’s likely the point. Unlike higher cash wages (which of course can be used for online college tuition as well as rent, gasoline, movie tickets, medical expenses, etc.), the tuition benefit is likely to be disproportionately appealing to people who are on the more ambitious end of the distribution. It’s an effort, in other words, to make Walmart more attractive specifically to the most appealing set of potential workers, a strategy other companies have pursued in recent years.

    Many large employers are trying tuition benefits

    Modest tuition programs have long been a staple of large employer benefits packages largely because of favorable tax treatment. The IRS allows employers to give employees several thousand dollars’ worth of tuition benefits tax-free, which makes establishing a program something of a no-brainer for most companies big enough to be employing a large back-office staff anyway.

    But four years ago, Starbucks blazed the trail of offering a much more ambitious reimbursement program that essentially offered taxable tuition subsidies rather than taxable wage increases.

    The reason: Academic research shows that workers who are interested in tuition subsidies are different from workers who are not. While everyone likes money, Peter Cappelli’s 2002 research indicates that the workers who like tuition subsidies are more productive than those who don’t, and Colleen Manchester’s 2012 research shows that subsidy-using employees have longer time horizons and are less likely to switch jobs.

    In March of this year, a consortium of big US hotels launched a generous tuition discount program, and later that month, McDonald’s substantially enhanced its tuition benefits. Kroger — another top five US employer — rolled out a new tuition program in April, and Chick-fil-A expanded its program in May.

    These initiatives differ in detail, but the broad story is the same. The unemployment rate is now low, so recruiting new staff is getting harder. Companies are looking to enhance their compensation but would like to do so in targeted ways.

    Continued in article

  • Robert E Jensen

    2018:  More than six million USA people take online courses each year, including one of every four undergraduates ---
    http://onlinelearningsurvey.com/reports/gradeincrease.pdf?elqTrackId=8a97109446ab42f4a6d1dd82378a5d42&elq=f017428740324fe9851503671bdc6dcc&elqaid=19259&elqat=1&elqCampaignId=8759

    Fee-based and free distance education training and education alternatives ---
    http://faculty.trinity.edu/rjensen/Crossborder.htm
    Many employers will pay all or part of the fees, including Starbucks, Wal-Mart, McDonalds, etc. For example, Starbucks will pay Arizona State University tuition even for part-time employees. McDonalds will pay tuition for onsite as well as online courses.

    Free MOOCs and other high-quality online learning alternatives (there may be fees for certificates and transcript credits but the MOOC learning is free for thousands of courses from prestigious universities around the world) ---
    http://faculty.trinity.edu/rjensen/000aaa/updateee.htm#OKI

    Video on One Possible Future of Higher Education ---
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5gU3FjxY2uQ

  • Robert E Jensen
  • Robert E Jensen